How to Join Member's Area Private Library Search Today's Topics p Login
Main Forums Discussion Tech Talk Mature Content Archives
   Nav Win
 Discussion
 Philosophy 101
 Very Well, What is Poetry?   [ Page: 1  2  3  4  5  ]
 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74
Follow us on Facebook

 Moderated by: Ron   (Admins )

 
User Options
Format for Better Printing EMail to a Friend Not Available
Admin Print Send ECard
Passions in Poetry

Very Well, What is Poetry?

 Post A Reply Post New Topic   Go to the Next Oldest/Previous Topic Return to Topic Page Go to the Next Newest Topic 
Edward Grim
Senior Member
since 12-18-2005
Posts 1112
Greenville, South Carolina


50 posted 03-31-2007 04:23 AM       View Profile for Edward Grim   Email Edward Grim   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit Edward Grim's Home Page   View IP for Edward Grim

Ess, I'm not saying you're talking about my stuff. You said "Chaos is not poetry!" and I simply said "well clearly you haven't read what I've written." Because people constantly say what I write is chaotic and that they can't understand it. 50% of the time, people ask me if I'm on drugs, so... lol, I think poetry is all too often classified as chaotic. On certain days, I like to contribute and on others, I'd rather just not write anything.

peace

Head Cheese & Chicken Feet

Essorant
Member Elite
since 08-10-2002
Posts 4689
Regina, Saskatchewan; Canada


51 posted 03-31-2007 10:33 AM       View Profile for Essorant   Email Essorant   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit Essorant's Home Page   View IP for Essorant

Then why don't you use traditional forms?  Freeverse may not be chaos, but it often has a likeness to chaos, especially when taken to extremes.

Ron
Administrator
Member Rara Avis
since 05-19-99
Posts 9708
Michigan, US


52 posted 03-31-2007 02:30 PM       View Profile for Ron   Email Ron   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit Ron's Home Page   View IP for Ron

If you can't write both, Essorant, you're not really writing either to its full potential.
Essorant
Member Elite
since 08-10-2002
Posts 4689
Regina, Saskatchewan; Canada


53 posted 03-31-2007 08:06 PM       View Profile for Essorant   Email Essorant   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit Essorant's Home Page   View IP for Essorant

I must disagree.  The success at one manner or form of poetry is not dependant on the other (especially one that tries to "free" itself from the important things that made English poetry successful to begin with).  No one needs to write in Freeverse, or Haiku, in order to write a nursury rhyme or iambic verse to its full potential.  

[This message has been edited by Essorant (03-31-2007 08:39 PM).]

Ron
Administrator
Member Rara Avis
since 05-19-99
Posts 9708
Michigan, US


54 posted 03-31-2007 10:23 PM       View Profile for Ron   Email Ron   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit Ron's Home Page   View IP for Ron

That sounds a bit dogmatic, Essorant. How do you know? Have you ever tried?

There is much more to form than the blind counting of syllables, stresses, and line breaks. That's just math, after all, beautiful in its own right but offering little enough insight. Good poetry can certainly be written within the strictures of form, but it must be poetry in spite of the form, not because of it. Poetry lies beyond form, beyond simple math.

Both form poetry and free verse rely on exactly the same things. The concentrations are a little different, but the recipe otherwise remains unchanged. I'll even go you one further and submit that good prose is, again, the same recipe, only seen from a slightly different focus. None of which should be at all surprising. Writing is always about communication.


Essorant
Member Elite
since 08-10-2002
Posts 4689
Regina, Saskatchewan; Canada


55 posted 04-01-2007 12:15 AM       View Profile for Essorant   Email Essorant   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit Essorant's Home Page   View IP for Essorant

"That sounds a bit dogmatic, Essorant. How do you know? Have you ever tried?"

Yes, I tried.  And I regret it.  Trying other forms was a weakness.  My practice of Haiku and some Free Verse did nothing but distract me my studies of the more at-home and important forms to the English poetic tradition.  I would've been more practiced in those if I hadn't been distracted with putzing around with other forms, partially under the influence of believing that writing more than one form makes one better at writing in either.  That proved wrong.  There is more than enough difficulty in one form, without burdening oneself with the difficulties of another as well, especially the kind of burden and difficulty people have with meter.  And among people today that are often already so time-consumed, burnt out and distracted from other things, that seems even more true.  I recommend trying to keep focused on one form, and not dividing yourself among another or many.  The more you keep focused and practice the one form, the more you will find success therein.  


"Good poetry can certainly be written within the strictures of form, but it must be poetry in spite of the form, not because of it. Poetry lies beyond form, beyond simple math. "

How?  A sandcastle isn't just a sandcastle because it is sand, but is a sandcastle for having the structure or shape of castle.  Without the structure or shape, the sand ceases to have any character beyond the sand itself.  Likewise, Poetry, unless must need structure or it ceases to have its character as poetry beyond the linguistic "sand" it is dependant on.  Therefore, I think poetry is poetry because of its structure too, even though it is poetry because of other things as well.

I agree that both form poetry and freeverse and prose are dependant on language.  But the other dependance is on shape or structure.  Without the shapes and structures that characterize them as this or that, all they become are a less structured and less meaningful symbolic "sand", used less and less artfully, the more they begin to lack their special shape and structure.  

Juju
Member Elite
since 12-29-2003
Posts 3353
In your dreams


56 posted 04-01-2007 01:37 AM       View Profile for Juju   Email Juju   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit Juju's Home Page   View IP for Juju

I love all poetry... done almost all of it...

But unless structure is used to enhance the beauty of poetry, it remains a tool.

A hammer is only a hammer.  It takes more than that to drive a nail into a wall.  

Writing a poem off as inferior, because of its lack of structure is either ignorant or stuck up.

I used to only write my poems in Cinquain.  It’s still my favorite form style.  I was surprised at the number of people that didn't recognize what I was doing.  I believe I have made that mistake as well years upon years ago.  I guess time has humbled me.  (:

There are different ways to put a nail in the wall.  The hammer just makes it easier.  Keep that in mind.  That is the only reason I pushed some people in the past to organize and structure poems.

that’s all

-Juju

-Juju

-"So you found a girl
Who thinks really deep thougts
What's so amazing about really deep thoughts " Silent all these Years, Tori Amos

Ron
Administrator
Member Rara Avis
since 05-19-99
Posts 9708
Michigan, US


57 posted 04-01-2007 11:52 AM       View Profile for Ron   Email Ron   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit Ron's Home Page   View IP for Ron

quote:
Yes, I tried.

Past tense, Essorant? How many decades did you try before giving up?

"Do or do not... there is no try."

quote:
A sandcastle isn't just a sandcastle because it is sand, but is a sandcastle for having the structure or shape of castle.  Without the structure or shape, the sand ceases to have any character beyond the sand itself.

Structure and shape are essential, I agree. But, Essorant, the universe isn't going to confine itself to only the structure and shape that you're currently able to see. Castles can be made from many things beyond sand, and sand can be used for many things beyond castles. If you focus on nothing but sandcastles, you'll likely find only sandcastles. Narrow views often need to be broadened.
Essorant
Member Elite
since 08-10-2002
Posts 4689
Regina, Saskatchewan; Canada


58 posted 04-01-2007 02:14 PM       View Profile for Essorant   Email Essorant   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit Essorant's Home Page   View IP for Essorant

"Past tense, Essorant? How many decades did you try before giving up?"
  
None.  It didn't take long to realize I was divided / distracted by trying to practice Free Verse, and Haiku on the side of studying and practicing Metrical verse, the true success of English poetry.  However, even among regulating stresses, syllables, and rhyme, I think it is important to settle in one pattern and most attentively perfect it, without flipflopping oneself much among other patterns.


"Castles can be made from many things beyond sand,"

Yes, castles can, but I was likening poetry to a sandcastle because it is dependant on it own "sand" language, but also dependant on the structure we give the sand (castle).  The importance of this is recognizing the less form and structure are retained, the less poetry retains it own special and distinct, because it is the structure and shape that distinguishes it from just being "sand" / "language"  The problem with free verse is that it tries and does take much of the shape and distinctness of poetry out of poetry, but then expects to be treated as if it is just as artful and poetic as when that shape and distinctness are retained and preserved as much as possible.  I just can't agree with that.  

Juju
Member Elite
since 12-29-2003
Posts 3353
In your dreams


59 posted 04-01-2007 03:34 PM       View Profile for Juju   Email Juju   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit Juju's Home Page   View IP for Juju

I strongly disagree ess.  Structure doesn't make the poetry, it can only enhance it.  Using structure is a tool and should be treated the same way.  

How did poetry start?  Did it start on paper?  No.

It started with men standing around a campfire telling stories.  The one with the best story won.  They used rhyme, metric, stressing, word usage and imagery to captivate their audience, and most importantly to tell their story. It was done so they could be immortalized; that their story may be passed down.  They started as stories of great war heroes, amazing adventures, and then even love and betrayal.

-Juju

-Juju

-"So you found a girl
Who thinks really deep thougts
What's so amazing about really deep thoughts " Silent all these Years, Tori Amos

Essorant
Member Elite
since 08-10-2002
Posts 4689
Regina, Saskatchewan; Canada


60 posted 04-01-2007 04:15 PM       View Profile for Essorant   Email Essorant   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit Essorant's Home Page   View IP for Essorant

I agree that poetry is strongly rooted with story-telling.  But there is still a strong difference between just Story in the language and Poetry. They have things in common, but they are distinctly different arts.  It is distinctly Poetry's unique shape and structure that distinguishes it from prose or loose conversation.  

[This message has been edited by Essorant (04-01-2007 04:47 PM).]

Juju
Member Elite
since 12-29-2003
Posts 3353
In your dreams


61 posted 04-01-2007 06:37 PM       View Profile for Juju   Email Juju   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit Juju's Home Page   View IP for Juju

My friend you are missing the point.  
-Everything starts somewhere.-

Free style doesn't mean the poet didn't put forth thought on how to say the words and the imagery.  I am not a well known poet, but I know enough to know that children get tired of building sand castles (I think I wrote a poem about this).  Eventhough they are all grown up they may want to make a sand castle time and time again.

but to be frank when the tides rise, adults know that thier sand castles wash away. No matter how well its constructed, sand remains sand.  It will wash away.  

That's why we build our homes of brick and stone.  You can structure all you want and the sand castle is just sand.

You would have been better off by a pile of rocks.

-Juju

-"So you found a girl
Who thinks really deep thougts
What's so amazing about really deep thoughts " Silent all these Years, Tori Amos

Ron
Administrator
Member Rara Avis
since 05-19-99
Posts 9708
Michigan, US


62 posted 04-02-2007 07:57 AM       View Profile for Ron   Email Ron   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit Ron's Home Page   View IP for Ron

quote:
... but then expects to be treated as if it is just as artful and poetic as when that shape and distinctness are retained and preserved as much as possible. I just can't agree with that.

Pity. You'll never know what you're missing, I guess.


Aurelian
Member
since 03-20-2007
Posts 109
TX, USA


63 posted 04-02-2007 09:01 AM       View Profile for Aurelian   Email Aurelian   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Aurelian

I guess I'd have to disagree with you somewhat Ess. I'm not ready to say Whitman's work isn't  poetry just because much of it was in free verse. I think the "concentrate" which is my definition of poetry can exist in a more unstructured form as well as that which is formed by regular meter and/or rhyme. But I'll give it to you that much that passes for "free verse" is more a result of sloppy work than the deliberate choice of a form. I like structured poetry myself - and I don't like chaos. It seems sometimes that some people think if you pull out a handful of words from Webster's at random and throw them at the screen the result is free verse. I disagree. I don't think that free verse should be an excuse for sloppiness, which it too often is. I just think that because the sound system isn't mathematical doesn't make it not poetry. Ultimately, the ear must decide. And if your ear doesn't decide that free verse is poetry - you can decide that way. Like Eliot said, you can not only choose to like whatever you want, you can like it for whatever reason you want. And I too wish that more people here would write structured poetry. If nothing else, it's a good exercise  - and often I find the very limitations of a structured form can be an inspiration.
Ron
Administrator
Member Rara Avis
since 05-19-99
Posts 9708
Michigan, US


64 posted 04-02-2007 11:00 AM       View Profile for Ron   Email Ron   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit Ron's Home Page   View IP for Ron

quote:
But I'll give it to you that much that passes for "free verse" is more a result of sloppy work than the deliberate choice of a form.

Seems to me that's just as true for poetry that does try to adhere to a form?
Aurelian
Member
since 03-20-2007
Posts 109
TX, USA


65 posted 04-02-2007 12:45 PM       View Profile for Aurelian   Email Aurelian   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Aurelian

That's true for sure - I just merely meant that some may shy away from the more structured types of poetry more from laziness than anything else - not everyone, just some of them.
Edward Grim
Senior Member
since 12-18-2005
Posts 1112
Greenville, South Carolina


66 posted 04-02-2007 02:13 PM       View Profile for Edward Grim   Email Edward Grim   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit Edward Grim's Home Page   View IP for Edward Grim

"Then why don't you use traditional forms?"

No thanks, I don't like traditional forms. I don't like to fall into any mold or be "one of the numbers." I like to be myself and who I am is not traditional. Cheers.
Juju
Member Elite
since 12-29-2003
Posts 3353
In your dreams


67 posted 04-03-2007 01:11 AM       View Profile for Juju   Email Juju   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit Juju's Home Page   View IP for Juju

Here is that poem I had wrote. Now ess,  this my friend is  in free style.  There is no structure.  Instead I used images, very powerful images.  I carefully chose my words. This is a poem.  Now I am not saying I am some great poet.  I am not.  I am just showing you, ess, what I meant.  I could have added structure(and it is rare for me to not be using some form, or making up one), but honestly I liked the imagery.
http://piptalk.com/pip/Forum102/HTML/000013.html
So ess here you go, if this is not a poem, say it. I really wont be mad.  

-Juju

-"So you found a girl
Who thinks really deep thougts
What's so amazing about really deep thoughts " Silent all these Years, Tori Amos

Essorant
Member Elite
since 08-10-2002
Posts 4689
Regina, Saskatchewan; Canada


68 posted 04-03-2007 03:20 AM       View Profile for Essorant   Email Essorant   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit Essorant's Home Page   View IP for Essorant

Of course that is a poem, Juju.  

I didn't ever try to say freeverse is not poetry, because that is not what I believe at all.

I feel that I was able to word my opinion clearliest in tearsoflove's thread, Pearls.  I hope that clarifies a bit better where I am coming from.

Edward Grim
Senior Member
since 12-18-2005
Posts 1112
Greenville, South Carolina


69 posted 04-05-2007 08:17 PM       View Profile for Edward Grim   Email Edward Grim   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit Edward Grim's Home Page   View IP for Edward Grim

Well Ess, I can't rightly dog on you for having an opinion and I'd like to try to avoid another lengthy discussion, lol (probably impossible). So I'll just offer my opinion on the subject.

"I won't hide the fact that I find freeverse an inferior form of writing poetry when held up in comparison with traditional, wellwritten formverse in English."  

Yes that is your opinion; one I strongly disagree with. Since I make movies, I'll use movies for comparison. Your above statement is like saying: Recording a motion picture on film is better than recording a motion picture on tape. There's no way one can make that comparison. They are two separate mediums for the same activity. Some say film is too hard to work with and requires too much light whereas digital tape is easy, crisp and clear. Some say film adds an ambience to the picture that digi tape could never achieve whereas some say that digi tape adds clarity that can't be beat.

That's like saying fiction writing is better than biographical writing. Or that driving a Corolla is better than driving a Camry.

It's all about the talent that goes behind the medium. Sloppy freeverse is bad; sloppy traditional writing is bad, end of story. I personally don't like traditional writing; that's not to say I think freeverse is better because I enjoy GOOD traditional writing. But today I find most of the traditional pieces hackneyed and lame. Anybody can make a poem rhyme and more often than not it is lame, extremely lame. Example:

Traditional Poem

I went to the house,
I saw a mouse,
We had tea,
But not coffee.

We went to play,
All the day,
We had much fun,
In the sun.


That is the worst piece of writing I’ve ever read (I hate myself for writing that just now). That is how I see most traditional poems written today. See Ess, at least freeverse tries to be different, but when it's bad it's unbearable to read. And when traditional writing is bad, you get the above poem . Like I said, it's all about the talent backing the style.

"In my opinion it is a bit of a delusion to paint it out as if it is an "equal" tool."

You're right. It's not an equal tool. Some would think it to be a better tool and some would think it an inferior tool. In my humblest of humble opinions, freeverse is strong because it doesn't have to follow any guidelines, guidelines that ultimately limit the writer. Think of writing as water. Traditional form is vase that one pours water into; yes, the vase is "pretty" but the water can only take one shape: the shape of the vase. I find freeverse to be an ocean; it can move and is vast and thrives without any limitations or restrictions.

"But since freeverse basically "frees" itself from those, it also lacks the long historical support of them."

Why would writing need "historical support?" I don't want another writer's history attached to my poem. I think a writing piece should be detached from another's historical support because that would mean the piece is completely original. Shouldn't all writing be original? People seem to put that on the backburner these days.

"That doesn't mean it doesn't have its own more individual strength, but that individual strength is is not as strong as the traditional forms already so strongly proven thro many ages."

Well back in Shakespeare's time and long before his time, the horse (traditional form) was proven to be the best mode of transportation. So should we all get rid of our cars to go to the stables because horse travel was strongly proven through the ages? Uh... I think not.

Peace amigo.

Head Cheese & Chicken Feet

Essorant
Member Elite
since 08-10-2002
Posts 4689
Regina, Saskatchewan; Canada


70 posted 04-06-2007 12:01 AM       View Profile for Essorant   Email Essorant   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit Essorant's Home Page   View IP for Essorant

"Your above statement is like saying: Recording a motion picture on film is better than recording a motion picture on tape."


Not true, Ed.  You are suggesting that poetry is just as distinct with either. But it is not .  We already have language, and that itself is a symbolic medium.  We already have ideas. We already have drama, stories, originality, eloquence in language that is not poetry.  So what strongly distinguishes poetry from any linguistic thing?  I tell you that is the strengthening and familiarizing with form and structure, not freeing and unfamiliarizing for "originality".  As long as poets wallow in this "I want originality, individuality, freedom" pit instead of fastening themselves to the foundations that made poetry strong, familiar and sucessful in the first place, they will never be able to write very strong poetry again.   When you take away the form and distinctness of something it naturally becomes less formed and less distinct.  And that is what freeverse is doing to poetry today.


"It's all about the talent that goes behind the medium. "

I don't care how much talent one has writing poetry with no poetic meter, or syllablecount or rhyme.  Any and every other writer can do that.  Prosewriters, scriptwriters, scientists, etc.  One has the whole rest of the writing world in which not to use the things that make poetry stronglyformed, unique, distinct from other linguistic arts, familiar to people, and also traditional and special to poetry in the English language. There is no reason to do so in poetry, unless more just to get one's work the special title of "poem", but not wanting the unlaziness of learning and practicing the seasoned forms and techniques that make a poem distinctly a strongformed poem, instead of just dramatic prose with linebreaks.

"That is the worst piece of writing I’ve ever read (I hate myself for writing that just now). That is how I see most traditional poems written today. "

Of course it is.  People can't remember how to write good form verse when they wallow so much in the flood of freeverse we see today.


Sorry I didn't address all your point.  Too weary right now.

Aurelian
Member
since 03-20-2007
Posts 109
TX, USA


71 posted 04-06-2007 12:20 AM       View Profile for Aurelian   Email Aurelian   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Aurelian

Oh, come on, there's enough free verse floating around that should be sandbagged and sent into the deep. Not everybody can write free verse, and not everybody can write structured verse. There's a lot to be said for both of them. Free verse vs. metered verse is like saying novel vs. short story. Each has it's own place and each is a distinct form of art. Free verse isn't just any random handful of words thrown at the page - it has to be done skillfully to be done at all. Some probably do write free verse out of laziness, but then again, some probably write short stories instead of novels for the same reason. The free and the more structured each have their place - and it takes a lot of tears and sweat to make something worthwhile either way. Oh well, here I'm sticking my neck out again into someone else's fight - Josh
Brad
Member Ascendant
since 08-20-99
Posts 5896
Jejudo, South Korea


72 posted 04-06-2007 07:31 PM       View Profile for Brad   Email Brad   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Brad

quote:
eloquence in language that is not poetry


And that would be? We certainly have eloquent language that is not part of a poem, but I suspect that the distinction between prose and poetry simply breaks down at this point.

This doesn't bother me, but for those still hypnotized by the linebreak, I suspect it can be a bit disconcerting.

Edward Grim
Senior Member
since 12-18-2005
Posts 1112
Greenville, South Carolina


73 posted 04-06-2007 07:40 PM       View Profile for Edward Grim   Email Edward Grim   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit Edward Grim's Home Page   View IP for Edward Grim

“We already have language, and that itself is a symbolic medium.”

I’d like to see you write poetry or anything else without language. It’s not a symbolic medium; it’s a necessary medium. Without it, there wouldn’t be poetry or writing at all, let’s not forget that. But can we not write in different languages? Or different forms of the same languages?

“We already have ideas.”

So we should recycle them incessantly? I’m sick and bloody tired of people idea harvesting and not trying to come up with their own ideas. Yes, we already have ideas; but let’s think up new ones shall we. I want new ideas damn it! I’m sick of re-runs in the movie theater and John Grisham novels! I’m tired of poeta that write the same crap as everyone else! Why can’t we be different? Why can’t we find our own voices?!

“I tell you that is the strengthening and familiarizing with form and structure, not freeing and unfamiliarizing for "originality".”

Writing is bull without originality. What the hell are we writing for if not to encompass our work in something that we can call our own? Otherwise, writing would be stale, no matter format it’s in.

“As long as poets wallow in this "I want originality, individuality, freedom" pit instead of fastening themselves to the foundations that made poetry strong, familiar and sucessful in the first place, they will never be able to write very strong poetry again.”  

I hate attitudes like that Ess, sorry to say, but I do. Yes, that format worked and still works (with talent) but that doesn’t mean another form is inferior to it or superior to it; it’s just another form, like film and video. I’m interested, why do you put down originality? Do you realize that without originality your work is a collection “been there, done that?” Where is the joy in reading if everyone writes the same crap?

”I don't care how much talent one has writing poetry”

Right there, you’ve defeated your entire point. Talent my dear friend, is everything. Without it the writer is defunct and the words produced are a waste of ink.

“Any and every other writer can do that.”

I disagree. On the contrary, it is anyone who can make a poem rhyme and be traditional. Almost every single poem on this site is traditional and practices rhyming. It’s sickening. It is hard to plunge into freeverse and pull out something good. Not ‘any and every other writer can do that.’

”Of course it is.  People can't remember how to write good form verse when they wallow so much in the flood of freeverse we see today.”

Well Ess, I made it bad on purpose. Lol. I was giving an example at how I see traditional poems today. Believe it or not, I’m quite familiar with Shakespearean verse. I’m actually writing a play that is reminiscent of Shakespeare’s language and time. Yes, I suppose you could say that freeverse has become a “flood”, most likely because it’s new. Freeverse is just another form of writing though; one cannot say that it is better or worse than other forms.


”Sorry I didn't address all your point.”

It’s cool dude.

Head Cheese & Chicken Feet

Essorant
Member Elite
since 08-10-2002
Posts 4689
Regina, Saskatchewan; Canada


74 posted 04-06-2007 08:30 PM       View Profile for Essorant   Email Essorant   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit Essorant's Home Page   View IP for Essorant

Brad


Methinks you are making a similar point to mine.  But, then, I often mistake what you mean.

Eloquence doesn't strongly distinguish poetry from prose, for prose includes much eloquence as well.  But it is chiefly a strong poetic FORM/STRUCTURE that distinguishes poetry from prose and gives it a special character of its own.  When you take away the importances of regulated and traditional/familiar poetic form and structure, as Free Verse, then all you have is wide and variable language again, without any strong poetic form or distinction.  


Huan Yi will be notified of replies
 Post A Reply Post New Topic   Go to the Next Oldest/Previous Topic Return to Topic Page Go to the Next Newest Topic 
All times are ET (US) Top
  User Options
>> Discussion >> Philosophy 101 >> Very Well, What is Poetry?   [ Page: 1  2  3  4  5  ] Format for Better Printing EMail to a Friend Not Available
Print Send ECard

 

pipTalk Home Page | Main Poetry Forums

How to Join | Member's Area / Help | Private Library | Search | Contact Us | Today's Topics | Login
Discussion | Tech Talk | Archives | Sanctuary



© Passions in Poetry and netpoets.com 1998-2013
All Poetry and Prose is copyrighted by the individual authors