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Passions in Poetry

What's in a Talent?

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Elizabeth
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0 posted 09-30-1999 05:04 PM       View Profile for Elizabeth   Email Elizabeth   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit Elizabeth's Home Page   View IP for Elizabeth

What makes a good poem, or a talented poet? Is it the way the poet writes-meter, etc.? Is it emotions-the way a poem maked the READER feel? Or is it subject matter?

------------------
*Elizabeth*

"Dwelt a maid belov'd and cherish'd by high and low,
But with autumn leaf she perish'd, long time ago..."

"Something sweet, something sort of grandish, sweeps my soul when thou art near..."

Witch's Brat
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1 posted 09-30-1999 05:22 PM       View Profile for Witch's Brat   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Witch's Brat

Sometimes it seems to be one of the three. I think that some people, on reading a poem with a mature subject matter, think, "Oh! What a great poet!" Same for the other two-if they write in perfect meter, like iambic pentameter or whatever, or if it makes the reader feel something-then it's good. Whose place is it to decide who has talent, though? Is it everyone else's, or our own?
Poet deVine
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2 posted 09-30-1999 09:00 PM       View Profile for Poet deVine   Email Poet deVine   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Poet deVine

I think it depends on what the reader likes.. I don't like some poetry so I don't read it..the poet may have bushels of talent, but I don't like that type of poetry. I don't like to be impressed with poetic perfection - I like to be impressed with an expression of feeling! I don't look for meter and rhyme..that's why I seldom respond to poetry posted on the Critical Analysis Forum...I feel poetry - talent or not..that's what I like!
Elizabeth
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3 posted 09-30-1999 09:41 PM       View Profile for Elizabeth   Email Elizabeth   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit Elizabeth's Home Page   View IP for Elizabeth

What if the poem has perfect meter and rhyme AND deep feelings?

------------------
*Elizabeth*

"Dwelt a maid belov'd and cherish'd by high and low,
But with autumn leaf she perish'd, long time ago..."

"Something sweet, something sort of grandish, sweeps my soul when thou art near..."

Julie Jordan Scott
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4 posted 10-02-1999 02:29 AM       View Profile for Julie Jordan Scott   Email Julie Jordan Scott   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit Julie Jordan Scott's Home Page   View IP for Julie Jordan Scott

My thought on this one, Elizabeth, that it would be a wonderful poem to experience then. And the poet would be a rich talent to discover!

For me? I like flowing poetry. Rhyming poetry and poetry of a certain formula get on my nerves. No clue why, it just does.

I do like haiku, and I like acrostic poetry, but any other "write it with these stipulations" just aren't for me! The poet may be fabulous and bound for glory....very talented! Just not my taste!

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Julie Jordan Scott is a Freelance Writer and Public Speaker,
but her favorite role is that of Mommy! Visit her website at
http://www.5passions.com
Brad
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5 posted 10-02-1999 08:43 PM       View Profile for Brad   Email Brad   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Brad

I don't think there is 'talent' -- a word that most people seem to use to mean 'magic' which hinders many beginning writers by thinking they have some skill before they have learned the craft. Writers are not wizards, they are tricksters, not Merlin but Doug Henning -- sp?(whatever happened to him?).

What is a good poem? I don't believe in objectivity in general but to simply say "I like what I like and that's that" seems static to me. If other people like a poem that you don't 'get' or you dislike, don't you wonder if you're missing something? To some extent, then, authoritative people in the 'know' may be necessary to guide you through poems that are attempting subtle and ever finer points of feeling and thought. You don't have to like them but you might be able to appreciate them better.

Most of what you like is based on experience and what other people have told you they like or not like (not always a teacher or a professor) anyway.

Brad

Elizabeth
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6 posted 10-02-1999 08:49 PM       View Profile for Elizabeth   Email Elizabeth   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit Elizabeth's Home Page   View IP for Elizabeth

I don't even know what to say anymore. On the one hand, I'm saying yes there's such a thing as talent, and on the other heand, I don't even care. I have heard people saying, "Oh, So-and-so is considered one of the best here at Netpoets." But, considered by whom? If one poet is good with rhyme and meter, the people who enjoy that kind of style will like that one. But the ones who don't like it are not going to read that one. I'm about to just give up with everything.

------------------
*Elizabeth*

"Dwelt a maid belov'd and cherish'd by high and low,
But with autumn leaf she perish'd, long time ago..."

"Something sweet, something sort of grandish, sweeps my soul when thou art near..."

Brad
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since 08-20-99
Posts 5896
Jejudo, South Korea


7 posted 10-03-1999 05:01 AM       View Profile for Brad   Email Brad   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Brad

Don't give up yet (unless you thought there was one answer to your question -- it's not answerable; it's more of a thought question. And a great one for this forum I might add.).

Just some points I might add:

1. the free verse/metered/rhyme controversy is interesting but certainly we've all read poems we didn't like in all of these forms and (I hope ) poems we liked in all of these forms.

2. Everybody is different and what some of us consider overdone, others might consider vibrant and special. Generally, I look for reasons the poet decided to write in the way he/she did. You can always find another way to say the 'same thing' -- I'm always curious why they wrote a certain way. Others might only be looking for an emotional connection only (the less technique, the better). We will definitely disagree about what is 'good' in a poem. So what? I like variety.

3. Shakespeare is considered the greatest poet who ever lived because more people have written about him than any other writer. Not only do they like him but they were moved enough to write and explain why they like him. This shows a degree of devotion that other poets (rightly or wrongly) don't yet have. Certainly, there's a difference between someone writing a book about Shakespeare and saying 'Brad, I really like your poetry'.

So, the first point to a good poem is that someone likes it. Fair enough?

The second point is the time that someone else devotes to that poet? If you read something, say you like it, and then forget about it as opposed to reading it and then help to get it published (among other things) that shows something special, perhaps, in that writer's ability.

Does this make any sense,
Brad (having fun now)
Brad
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8 posted 10-03-1999 05:23 AM       View Profile for Brad   Email Brad   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Brad

Continuing,
If you believe in the time/devotion argument (you don't have to) then it follows that people who read more poetry 'should' no what a 'better' poem is. This is still not an objective opinion, just a, well, how about more informed opinion?

Does this matter to what you, personally, like and dislike? Only, and I mean only, if you respect that person's opinion. If you don't it doesn't matter (and you can still respect the person, just not that particular opinion). If you do respect the person who says, he or she is a better poet (or a better stylist, or a better rhymer or whatever), ask why he or she thinks so?

The answer will either be persuasive or not depending on how both of you see the world around you, want a certain type of poetry, and, of course, how that explanation was phrased in a language the two of you understand. Actually, now that I think about it, there are other factors like mood and experience involved as well (and certainly many more).

So what is all this mess saying: Anytime someone says a certain poet is the best at anything: they mean, I like that poet better than all others either for a general feeling, a consistency, or for some specific aspect of what he or she does. It's up to you to agree or disagree (disagreeing's the fun part for me).

Get rid of objectivity. It never works. Listen to whom you respect. But never take anything at someone's word. Have fun.

Did I come full circle yet?

Brad

PS Wondering what I'll have to retract tomorrow.

 
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