How to Join Member's Area Private Library Search Today's Topics p Login
Main Forums Discussion Tech Talk Mature Content Archives
   Nav Win
 Tech Talk
 Geek Stuff
 binary math
 1 2 3 4 5
Follow us on Facebook

 Moderated by: Christopher   (Admins )

 
User Options
Format for Better Printing EMail to a Friend Not Available
Admin Print Send ECard
Passions in Poetry

binary math

 Post A Reply Post New Topic   Go to the Next Oldest/Previous Topic Return to Topic Page Go to the Next Newest Topic 
Jeffrey Carter
Deputy Moderator 1 TourDeputy Moderator 1 TourDeputy Moderator 1 TourDeputy Moderator 1 Tour
Member Elite
since 04-08-2000
Posts 2424
State of constant confusion!


0 posted 07-29-2004 07:01 PM       View Profile for Jeffrey Carter   Email Jeffrey Carter   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Jeffrey Carter

Anyone know any good websites on binary math?
Jeffrey Carter
Deputy Moderator 1 TourDeputy Moderator 1 TourDeputy Moderator 1 TourDeputy Moderator 1 Tour
Member Elite
since 04-08-2000
Posts 2424
State of constant confusion!


1 posted 07-29-2004 08:50 PM       View Profile for Jeffrey Carter   Email Jeffrey Carter   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Jeffrey Carter

ok i found this site http://www.cs.iupui.edu/~n241/readings/binconv.html but holy cow, anyone care to help me out .... this is hard stuff!!!
Ron
Administrator
Member Rara Avis
since 05-19-99
Posts 9708
Michigan, US


2 posted 07-29-2004 10:31 PM       View Profile for Ron   Email Ron   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit Ron's Home Page   View IP for Ron

Binary math is easy. About ten times easier than decimal math, in fact.

When you add the digits 9 and 1, you know the answer can't be a digit greater than 9. So what do you do? You write down a zero and carry the one, and end up with 10.

What does this 10 mean? Since we're in base ten, it means no units and one ten.

When you add the digits 1 and 1 in a base two system, you know the answer can't be a digit greater than 1. So what do you do? You write down a zero and carry the one, and end up with 10.

What does this 10 mean? Since we're in base two, it means no units and one two.

When you see the number 1111 in the decimal system, you don't have to think real hard about what each digit really means, but that's only because it's been drilled into your head for so long. We know, without giving it much thought, that from right to left we have 1 unit of ones, 1 unit of tens, 1 unit of hundreds, and 1 unit of thousands. Each of those represents our base (ten) raised to a specific power.

1 * 10^0 = 1
1 * 10^1 = 10
1 * 10^2 = 100
1 * 10^3 = 1000

Add those all up an you get 1,111, or one thousand one hundred eleven. Simple stuff.

If you see that same 1111 in binary, you do EXACTLY the same thing.

1 * 2^0 = 1
1 * 2^1 = 2
1 * 2^2 = 4
1 * 2^3 = 8

Add those up and you'll know that binary 1111 is equivalent to decimal 15. It's *still* simple stuff.


Jeffrey Carter
Deputy Moderator 1 TourDeputy Moderator 1 TourDeputy Moderator 1 TourDeputy Moderator 1 Tour
Member Elite
since 04-08-2000
Posts 2424
State of constant confusion!


3 posted 07-30-2004 01:49 PM       View Profile for Jeffrey Carter   Email Jeffrey Carter   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Jeffrey Carter

so instead of raising the number to a power of 10 we raise it to a power of 2?

so in binary the number 1101 would be written like this....

1*2^0=1
1*2^1=2 but actually since the second number is zero the end result would be zero also correct?
1*2^2=4
1*2^3=8

so the end result would be 13?

Thanks for taking the time to help me with this Ron, I really appreciate it.
Ron
Administrator
Member Rara Avis
since 05-19-99
Posts 9708
Michigan, US


4 posted 07-30-2004 07:50 PM       View Profile for Ron   Email Ron   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit Ron's Home Page   View IP for Ron

You've got the right idea (and the right answer), Jeffrey, but still need just one minor adjustment. Change your example to this:

1*2^0=1
0*2^1=0
1*2^2=4
1*2^3=8

Notice how the digits on the left now reflect the 1101 you are calculating? Another example in decimal might make it more clear why:

0*10^0 = 0*1 = 0
2*10^1 = 2*10 = 20
7*10^2 = 7*100 = 700
5*10^3 = 5*1000 = 5000

Ergo, we know 5720 in base 10 is, uh, 5,720.

(For those who might be wondering, any number raised to a power of zero equals one, and any number raised to a power of one will equal itself.)
Jeffrey Carter
Deputy Moderator 1 TourDeputy Moderator 1 TourDeputy Moderator 1 TourDeputy Moderator 1 Tour
Member Elite
since 04-08-2000
Posts 2424
State of constant confusion!


5 posted 07-31-2004 12:06 AM       View Profile for Jeffrey Carter   Email Jeffrey Carter   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Jeffrey Carter

ok, Ron, thanks again for taking the time to help me I really do appreciate it.
 
 Post A Reply Post New Topic   Go to the Next Oldest/Previous Topic Return to Topic Page Go to the Next Newest Topic 
All times are ET (US) Top
  User Options
>> Tech Talk >> Geek Stuff >> binary math Format for Better Printing EMail to a Friend Not Available
Print Send ECard

 

pipTalk Home Page | Main Poetry Forums

How to Join | Member's Area / Help | Private Library | Search | Contact Us | Today's Topics | Login
Discussion | Tech Talk | Archives | Sanctuary



© Passions in Poetry and netpoets.com 1998-2013
All Poetry and Prose is copyrighted by the individual authors