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Speaking of HTM.......L

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Christopher
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0 posted 02-21-2001 05:02 PM       View Profile for Christopher   Email Christopher   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Christopher


This is a point of curiosity only - nothing more. What is the difference between an htm extension and an html extension? I know there are varying others, such as shtml, dhtml, etc., which I assume are dynamic extensions - but what about the missing "l?"

C
WhtDove
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1 posted 02-21-2001 05:19 PM       View Profile for WhtDove   Email WhtDove   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit WhtDove's Home Page   View IP for WhtDove

Good question Chris! I've often wondered that myself.

A markup without Language. Go figure. I have no clue what that really means.
Ron
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2 posted 02-21-2001 09:01 PM       View Profile for Ron   Email Ron   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit Ron's Home Page   View IP for Ron

That's an easy one, guys. The Internet predates Windows 95 by nearly five years. Unix has always supported long filenames, but in the old DOS/Win 3.x days, our PC's were pretty much stuck with 8.3 file names. So, around '92, when the Internet started really coming to life in the PC world, the Unix people added the .htm extension to suit us. But, except for the missing language, it's synonomous with its longer brethern.

Internet Trivia Time: What computer platform saw the first web browser?
WhtDove
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3 posted 02-21-2001 10:53 PM       View Profile for WhtDove   Email WhtDove   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit WhtDove's Home Page   View IP for WhtDove

I'm searching, closest I can come is called a microcomputer?
Nicole
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4 posted 02-22-2001 05:26 PM       View Profile for Nicole   Email Nicole   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Nicole

UNIX?
Ron
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5 posted 02-22-2001 05:42 PM       View Profile for Ron   Email Ron   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit Ron's Home Page   View IP for Ron

Close, Nicole.

But, while it was patterned after Unix, comparing this platform to Unix is like comparing DOS to Windows NT. Does the name Steve ring any bells for anyone?
Alicat
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6 posted 02-23-2001 03:09 PM       View Profile for Alicat   Email Alicat   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Alicat

Geeze, Ron...you sure know how to tweak the old brain cells.
Well, I recall being on Vax/VMS around that time....checking email and playing MUDs.
I don't reckon you're referring to the Apple Macs before Microsoft stole and adapted their platform for Windows, would ya?

I'm not certain, but I don't think the Amiga was internet capable, but I do remember the old modems for the Commodore 64/128/128D.
Nicole
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7 posted 02-23-2001 03:26 PM       View Profile for Nicole   Email Nicole   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Nicole

Okay - I'm SO still looking. I've been having a great time (seriously) reading up on the history of the internet - some of which I've read about before, but only just teeny bits.

Steve - sigh...no bells. Well, that's not true - there's this little tiny one in the back of my head, and it's kinda ringing. But - I don't know if that's because Steve is the name of my mailman at work?

Honestly though, I'm reallycurious. I've been reading and reading since yesterday, and while I've leaned so much new stuff - I've also learned that there...well...was SO much more new stuff to learn! I've read about CERN, and Tim Berners-Lee - and I've found something about a guy named Doug Engelbart, who apparently prototyped an "oNLine System" that did hypertext browsing, etc. And that was in 1960...

Was it Macintosh...really??

Oh Ron, do tell. Please!


[This message has been edited by Nicole (edited 02-23-2001).]
Moon Dust
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8 posted 02-23-2001 04:32 PM       View Profile for Moon Dust   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Moon Dust

I thought it was just a way of shortern it

~Maria~

Ron
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9 posted 02-23-2001 05:11 PM       View Profile for Ron   Email Ron   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit Ron's Home Page   View IP for Ron

November, 1990 (CERN): Mike Sendall buys a NeXT cube, the new computer system pioneered by former Apple star Steve Jobs, and gives it to Tim Berners-Lee. Using NeXT's object-oriented technology, Berners-Lee's prototype of a web browser is implemented in the space of a few months. This prototype offers true WYSIWYG browsing and authoring.

The prototype is very impressive, but the NeXTStep system is not widely spread. In 1991, a simplified, stripped-down version (with no editing facilities) that can be easily adapted to any computer is constructed: the Portable "Line-Mode Browser". About this same time, the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center in California, becomes the first Web server in the US. By the time the portable browser is released by CERN as freeware in 1992, there are a total of 50 web servers throughout the world.

In 1993, Marc Andreessen, then an employee of NCSA in Illinois,  released a version of his new, handsome, point-and-click graphical browser for the Web, designed to run on Unix machines. In August of the same year, Andreessen and his co-workers at the center released free versions for Macintosh and Windows. In December, Andreessen left the NCSA and moved to California, where he met Jim Clark, founder of SGI. In March, 1994, Andreessen and Clark flew back to Illinois  and invited about half a dozen of the NCSA's main Mosaic developers over for a chat. By May, virtually the entire ex-NCSA development group was working for Mosaic Communications  - the company that would soon change its name to Netscape.

(p.s.The best history of the Web, IMHO.)
Nicole
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10 posted 02-23-2001 05:21 PM       View Profile for Nicole   Email Nicole   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Nicole

Wasn't Mike Sendall, Tim B-L's boss? Ohhh why. didn't. I. see. that?

*smacks head on desk*

Ron, you're awesome
 
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