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Occupy Wall Street

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Balladeer
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50 posted 10-09-2011 02:01 AM       View Profile for Balladeer   Email Balladeer   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit Balladeer's Home Page   View IP for Balladeer

Hey, you don't need my permission...or approval. This country that they are protesting against gives you that choice.....and right.
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51 posted 10-09-2011 02:20 AM       View Profile for serenity blaze   Email serenity blaze   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for serenity blaze

I want G.E. to pay back taxes.

I really doooo....

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52 posted 10-09-2011 02:34 AM       View Profile for Balladeer   Email Balladeer   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit Balladeer's Home Page   View IP for Balladeer

I know what you mean. I want Buffet to pay his, too. I want people like Holder and Rangel who thought they could get away with tax evasion to go to jail.  I also want that Red Ryder BB gun!
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53 posted 10-09-2011 03:28 AM       View Profile for serenity blaze   Email serenity blaze   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for serenity blaze

I happen to think we should begin on what we agree upon...like the above.

I think that corporations that hire citizens of the United States should be allowed tax incentives. <--don't wince, I'm not done.

I don't think that corporations that outsource jobs should be granted tax allowances when they outsource jobs to foreign countries.

Do we agree on this?

I exit, looking for Bohner's huge hammer...

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54 posted 10-09-2011 03:29 AM       View Profile for serenity blaze   Email serenity blaze   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for serenity blaze

whooops

found it!!!

*giggles*
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55 posted 10-09-2011 03:38 AM       View Profile for serenity blaze   Email serenity blaze   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for serenity blaze



rightcheer!
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56 posted 10-09-2011 05:54 AM       View Profile for Mistletoe Angel   Email Mistletoe Angel   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit Mistletoe Angel's Home Page   View IP for Mistletoe Angel

I consider myself neither passionate nor dismissive of these waves of protests. I'm feeling much the same way toward these protests as I was toward the Tea Party protests in their nascent stages. I'm encouraged by any sort of spontaneous effort driven by a group of thoughtful, passionate individuals embodying the Margaret Mead philosophy.......but all the same little I've seen inspires me to go out myself and jump in.........for reasons already echoed here, and for the following three insights:

*

Firstly, this week's release of Occupy Wall Street's "official first statement" sums up my skepticism of the movement having any legs in a nutshell. I feel it encapsulates my hunch of this "movement" lacking staying power. There's a central pitch surely, which goes as follows:

*

“We come to you at a time when corporations, which place profit over people, self-interest over justice, and oppression over equality, run our governments.”


*

Fair enough. I can vouch for that. That said, the problem is, it is immediately followed by a laundry list of grievances..............which ultimately largely bury this important statement and it winds up not standing out explicitly. And don't get me wrong. It's important to illuminate, to put into perspective, how corporate influences have skewed the playing field for the rest of us who are trying to ensure we can still fulfill the fullest promise of life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness.‎.........to which that prospect is growing dimmer by the day to many of us, and to our loved ones.

The problem is, the grievances consume virtually the entire remainder of the statement. Meaning virtually the entire body of the text concerns itself with protesting, and none regarding how Occupy Wall Street is going to emerge an organizing force, a conscious movement, with slews of constructive aims and ideas on how we return to a nation that is people-powered, justice-oriented, and egalitarian-minded.

The grievances also lack cohesion here; there's not enough connecting of the dots so it will paint a most stark, emotionally-affecting image to those who obviously are bearing the brunt of all these grievances, yet doesn't know how to navigate through the thick of it and can imagine what the alternatives are.


*

Secondly, the simple idea of "occupying" something comes across as somewhat off-putting and unsettling to me. I don't even know what the Portland contingent of the larger Occupy _______ "movement" is actually occupying, for one.

Tom McCall Waterfront Park in downtown Portland is the focal point of the Occupy Portland chapter. Is that implying that Portland's city parks are representative of meritocracy gone amuck, above all else? As a symbolic sign of "solidarity" (whatever that means), it certainly can look exciting and inspiring.............but as a statement or collective intention, it just doesn't make sense to me. If anything, Tom McCall Waterfront Park represents so much that is special about Portland. We can do so much better about caring for the homeless and treating them with dignity here, but the park comes closer than most other parts of town in providing a preferred space for the homeless community here, for one. So to "occupy" this area, as opposed to..........say............the Wells Fargo headquarters downtown..........just sends out an uneasy mixed message, from my perspective.

I much highly prefer the term "convergence". It has a positive, organic gathering quality to it, a comely connotation. "Occupy" comes across as defensive, as though the world around you is a battlefield. A simple once-over of the etymology of "occupy" confirms this. It is derived from the Latin word "occupare".........meaning to: "take over, seize, possess, occupy,".........and is an assemblage of ob (meaning "over") and the intensive form of capere (meaning "to grasp, seize"). According to historical records, "occupy" was actually an euphemism to "have sexual intercourse with,"..............and it observed a period between the early sixteenth and late seventeenth centuries where it fell out of favor in result.

So what am I supposed to gather from the "Occupy ______" moniker other than that the uber-rich (or "1%") have hijacked the wealth of the other 99% of Americans and now it's time to take over, seize and possess ourselves, as long as I'm taking words too literally here? It makes me feel nervous and intimidated, more than anything, rather than engaged and inspired.


*

Finally..............it just stands to reason that we'll all be served better by focusing on asking for what we want, rather than what we don't. If I say I don't like something, like I did repeatedly during the greater part of the previous decade with regards to our foreign policy in particular..........that told you how I felt, but not what I want instead.

It just seems the "Occupy _______" protests are much more about railing against so many things (noting their "first official statement again) than about standing strongly for many things, or at least for something. I'm sorry, but "solidarity" is NOT a tangible thing. "Solidarity", if anything, is more than just an insubstantial buzzword.........it's usually just one of numerous forms cultural groupthink assumes in my view. I'll reiterate at this time that as much as I'm happy to see at least some degree of passion on the streets, outside of people's homes, with peaceful results thus far.............so much of this movement seems to be so anti-minded.

Mother Teresa said it so well: "I was once asked why I don't participate in anti-war demonstrations. I said that I will never do that, but as soon as you have a pro-peace rally, I'll be there." There's still time for an effort of this sort to mature and begin reaching within and devoting its time and intention to what positive change it hopes to usher.........and should that time come, I'll open-mindedly consider the invitation.

In the meantime, though..........I just feel these protests, along with the later Tea Party protests, have incited a lot of self-censorship more than anything. Where it's gotten to the point where many were pining for a "revolution" for so long, then suddenly they see a protest that has managed to hold up for a longer period of time than usual, and they just leap right into it without putting some personal reflection, some introspection, behind doing so. I've been candid (politely so) about my criticisms of these protests on Facebook event listings.....................and the most common response I've received thus far (in a polite tone) is along the lines of: "Well, that's the purpose of this whole rally. We're coming together, uniting, talking about this, formulating what all we want and how to go about it. One step at a time right? We can't ask for what we want until we unite, gather, share ideas, and move from there! This is just the beginning! Revolution doesn't happen overnight, mind you!".

When I join any given protest or demonstration, I want to feel genuinely and emotionally engaged to it. I certainly felt just that way during my time visibly protesting the war in Iraq and denouncing assaults on various civil liberties. I certainly feel that way through my involvement in SlutWalk Portland and the Walk A Mile In Her Shoes events. I wasn't coaxed into either of those. I wasn't pressured into thinking if I didn't join them that that would somehow make me feel like less of a person, or insensitive to the concerns of others. I did so on my own volition.........because both causes feel true to my heart. Occupy _________, in contrast................I just don't feel this. The protests don't make me feel anything. They just leave me scratching my head and utter a sad, sympathetic sigh.


*

I came across rather blunt there, and I'll wrap up here by saying I'm certainly not putting anyone down when I express my honest thoughts and skepticism here about the broader effort and its crucial flaws from my perspective. Much like with the Tea Party protests, I think a strong majority of the sentiments permeating these ones are ones I can sympathize with and harbor pure intent. And so as critical as I am of Occupy _______ in its broader context, I'm not going to be dismissive of the sum of its parts either..........because I feel overshadowed by all the divisive "99% vs. 1%" and somewhat confrontational rhetoric...........I think we can all see parts of ourselves and our own worries, fears, anxieties and aspirations mirrored through their eyes collectively, much like with the Tea Party............and to put them down would prove a grave disservice for us all.

*

Namaste,
lisping HIBISCUS


"If we have no peace, it is because we have forgotten that we belong to each other"

Mother Teresa
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57 posted 10-09-2011 11:03 AM       View Profile for Balladeer   Email Balladeer   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit Balladeer's Home Page   View IP for Balladeer

I don't think that corporations that outsource jobs should be granted tax allowances when they outsource jobs to foreign countries.

Right on, lady. I'm with you there


Noah! It's always a pleasure to see you, my friend! Whether we always agree or not, you always provide a lot of insight in your replies..and do it well.
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58 posted 10-09-2011 11:18 AM       View Profile for Balladeer   Email Balladeer   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit Balladeer's Home Page   View IP for Balladeer

Well, the dems like them...which may come back to haunt them.

"God bless them for their spontaneity." Nancy Pelosi, the House minority leader and a Democrat from California, said of the demonstrators.

The House's No. 4 Democrat, John Larson of Connecticut, went further. "The silent masses aren't so silent anymore," Larson said earlier this week. "They are fighting to give voice to the struggles that everyday Americans are going through. While I don't condone their every action, I applaud their standing up for what they believe in."


How about that? Surely, then, he supported the Tea Party for standing up for what they believed in...not.


And Krugman, a New York Times columnist and key liberal opinion-shaper, wrote Friday that "we may, at long last, be seeing the rise of a popular movement that, unlike the Tea Party, is angry at the right people."

Interesting comment. The law-abiding tea party were evil but the unruly occupiers with no real agenda is a "popular movement by the people"..all because Klugman feels they are after the right people, i.e., non-liberals. Don't look now, fellow, but you are in their cross-hairs, too.


President Obama has been cautiously positive about the Occupy events. "The protesters are giving voice to a more broad-based frustration about how our financial system works," he said during a Thursday press conference.
http://news.yahoo.com/blogs/lookout/eric-cantor-says-wall-street-prot esters-mobs-democrats-191017569.html


These are all people who lambasted tea-partiers. One need to look no further to see how laughable their double-standard is.

Obama is spending his days appealing to "the people" to get his jobs bill passed. He encourages this type of behavior and, I feel, behind the scenes he is supporting it, working hand in hand with Soros and the unions. I don't think he has any objections to civil unrest at all, whether it is peaceful or not. Getting his way is all that matters, regardless of what it may do to the country.
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59 posted 10-09-2011 01:35 PM       View Profile for Denise   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Denise

If those people didn't have double-standards, Michael, they wouldn't have ANY standards at all!
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quote:


And Krugman, a New York Times columnist and key liberal opinion-shaper, wrote Friday that "we may, at long last, be seeing the rise of a popular movement that, unlike the Tea Party, is angry at the right people."

Interesting comment. The law-abiding tea party were evil but the unruly occupiers with no real agenda is a "popular movement by the people"..all because Klugman feels they are after the right people, i.e., non-liberals. Don't look now, fellow, but you are in their cross-hairs, too.



     If your quote is accurate, and it may not be for all I know, Krugman says nothing about Liberals or Conservatives here.  It appears that you are making a political generalization from an economic premise; and, while they are often connected, they often are not.  Mr. Soros and the Brothers Koch are all wealthy folks, for example, but their politics are widely separated, aren’t they?

     While I believe that Mr. Krugman is probably a Liberal personally, his comment here seems to be addressing a common source of frustration in the country.  The frustration is common to both sides of the political spectrum, left and right, and that is the suspicion that a large economic con game was played on the public by a lot of the banking and insurance and brokerage houses in the country.  Those folks, a lot of us feel, seem to have made a lot of money over the last ten years or so at the expense of a lot of working and middle class folks and have left us holding the financial bag.

     Mr. Krugman seems to be saying, to my ears, that these demonstrators are steamed at the folks who’ve walked away with huge profits and left a large part of the rest of the country holding the bag.  Their anger is against the folks who have profited in ways that seem, at least on the surface, unfairly, and I hear Dr. Krugman saying that this stuff ought to be investigated.  

     I think the Democrats are cautious — and if you actually read what you’re quoting instead of what you think you’re quoting, at least from the President, the enthusiasm is at best, measured — because the Democrats have not been pushing any investigative efforts were hard at all.  They should be.  The Republicans, if anything, are even more cautious, and at times it seems as though they are colluding  both with the Democrats and with the financial community to keep the facts uninvestigated almost entirely.

     The whole set of comments about the Tea Party, as far as I’m concerned, is almost entirely off the subject.  The Tea Party is a populist party and it has no clear Economic Policy.  I haven’t seen any evidence that it understands the need for a Macroeconomic policy for the government and that such a line of action is distinct from what a company needs to do to pursue its economic growth or what a household needs to ensure its survival.  It constantly conflates business experience and goverment experience, and imagines that the two of them are equivalent.  Strategies for dealing with economic downturns in a family, a business, and an economy, on the contrary are not the same, and confusing them can be a disaster.

     In my opinion, “going after the right people” would mean hiring a large staff of competent investigators and having a close look at the books of the various companies involved in the financial problems of the last decade.  It would involve hiring at least as many investigators as were hired as we used in looking into the much smaller Savings and Loan crisis in the 1980’s, and it would involve bringing at least as many charges against people that proved to be guilty of the same level of mismanagement, fraud and wrong-doing.  

     You may have noticed, but we have managed to let this whole affair skate without bringing major charges and without sending many people to jail.  I think those are the folks that are “the right people” that Dr. Krugman is talking about.  I think that the folks who want something done about those guilty persons have nothing whatsoever to do with Liberal or Conservative, though it would serve both parties, Democrats and Republicans, very well if the issue could be divided that way.  There are people with large amounts of money who’d rather not have the events of the last ten years investigated, and I think they write checks to both parties.

     Lest there be any doubts here, you bet I’m still a Democrat, and a bit further left than Liberal at that, and I’ll be happy to fight about that when I think that’s actually the issue.  But here, I’d have to say it’s not.
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61 posted 10-10-2011 07:48 AM       View Profile for Balladeer   Email Balladeer   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit Balladeer's Home Page   View IP for Balladeer

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62 posted 10-10-2011 01:03 PM       View Profile for Essorant   Email Essorant   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit Essorant's Home Page   View IP for Essorant

Isn't it a bit dishonest to suggest they are against corporations when they are against the greed and corruption in corporations, banks, etc?  I have never yet seen any of them saying they are against corporations themselves.  

So far all your comments seem an attempt to ridicule or dismiss them.  Is that all you are interested in?  
 
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63 posted 10-10-2011 04:51 PM       View Profile for Denise   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Denise

I thought of a great name for them in similar fashion to the left designating us as 'teabaggers': FREEBAGGERS (since a lot of them are calling for 'free' stuff from the government!) It's not quite as insulting as the former since it doesn't have a perverted sexual tinge to it, but I thought it was funny!
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64 posted 10-10-2011 07:18 PM       View Profile for Huan Yi   Email Huan Yi   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Huan Yi

.


I think it was Thomas Sowell who said blaming greed
is like blaming gravity for a plane falling out of the sky.
We expect corporations to maximize their profits.  If
they charge too much or produce a product not worth
the price, competition will put them out of business.
I would need an example of present ongoing corruption
to comment.  However I think government, ( which
does have the characteristics of a monopoly), favoritism
and coercion corrupting the marketplace deserves a
placard or two . . .  


.

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65 posted 10-10-2011 07:29 PM       View Profile for Balladeer   Email Balladeer   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit Balladeer's Home Page   View IP for Balladeer

Ess, with all due respect, Uncas began this thread by asking us our opinions of the "occupy Wall Street" protests. My entries have all been directed at answering his question. If my comments seem to ridicule or dismiss them, there's a good reason for that - I find them ridiculous and dismissable.

At the Occupy Sacremento gathering yesterday, the leader of the organization was asked by a local reporter what the mission of the gathering was. The fellow said that it was a little vague right now but he has set up a group who would determine why they were there and announce it soon. What part of that does one not find to be ridiculous??? That is not limited to Sacramento. No one in any of the gatherings, including Wall Street, has been  able to answer that question. They are simply protesting. A New York Post reporter was offered marijuana for 15 bucks or heroin for 10 by an entrepreneur going through the crowd offering his wares. There were also reports of others passing out free condoms. What does one not find ridiculous there??

For these groups that have not announced their goals, Nancy Pelosi ask God to bless them and she knows that they will reach their goals (which they have not been able to name).  That makes HER ridiculous, which was really not necessary, since she has had that distinction for some time.

I have never yet seen any of them saying they are against corporations themselves.

Is  that a fact? Then you didn't see the signs that claim..


RIGHTS FOR THE PEOPLE, NOT THE CORPORATIONS and CORPORATIONS RUN THE COUNTRY. LET'S DO SOMETHING ABOUT IT. There are other signs denouncing capitalism (of which corporations are an integral part) . Nothing against the corporations? REALLY?

If there is anything which does not point to ridiculous, I'd sure like to hear it. If there is any reason why their actions should not be dismissed as being nothing more than the ravings of fools with no solutions of their own, please share them with me.

It's an event - a happening - a Woodstock without the music. To try to paint it as having eny more signifigance than that is what I would call.....yep, ridiculous.
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66 posted 10-10-2011 08:05 PM       View Profile for Huan Yi   Email Huan Yi   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Huan Yi

.


http://www.nationalreview.com/articles/279438/green-jobs-are-national-scanda  l-deroy-murdock?page=1


QED


There are also government subsidies to farmers that now limit and raise the
cost of food on the world’s table . . .
Are farmers to blame?


.

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     Might be, Denise, if you could actually connect your notion of freeloaders with the people doing the demonstrating.  In the meantime, you don't seem to have noticed that you appear long on accusations and short on proof.  Maybe there is evidence that the demonstrators are freeloaders and I haven't seen it in any of your postings, Denise; but I haven't seen a lot of published evidence of what the demographics of these demonstrators may be.

      "Freebaggers" was your term, and you indicated you didn't intend it to be, to quote you directly, "quite as insulting as  ['teabaggers'] since it doesn't have a perverted sexual tinge to it,"  but it apparently amused you anyway.  

quote:

I thought it was funny!



     I believe I have you in context here, but if not, please let me know.  I will, however, be puzzled as to how that might have happened.

     The amusement in the term "tea-bagger," as I remember it, was in watching a large number of repressed and in large part anti-homosexual people walking around with tea-bags stapled to their faux-staw hats, absolutely clueless about having signed up to become the butt of a joke.  It was not in going out of one's way to create a joke about them, which would have not been funny at all, simply crass and cruel.

     Sort of like the difference between seeing some poor schmo slip on a banana peel and tripping him, you know?  

     I think that there is some evidence that republicans and Tea Party folk tend to be older Americans, on the whole.  I'd have to check into that to be sure, but I believe that some of that research has been done on the demographics there.  Before you feel entitled to suggest that the demonstrators are freeloaders, you might consider what you mean.  The term "freeloader," to be sure, was my suggestion.  Perhaps you meant something else.  I was simply suggesting it as a more concrete and directly definable word.  Should you choose to substitute another, that would be fine with me.

     I don't consider people on social security to be freeloaders, for example.  People on unemployment have paid into their unemployment insurance account and are getting benefits paid out from those plans which both they and their former employers have paid into; and which cover them when they have been fired without cause.  AFDC and WIC are in support of families and in support of young children.
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68 posted 10-10-2011 08:30 PM       View Profile for Balladeer   Email Balladeer   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit Balladeer's Home Page   View IP for Balladeer

I haven't seen it in any of your postings, Denise; but I haven't seen a lot of published evidence of what the demographics of these demonstrators may be.

No problem....



Though a few representatives of minority groups have appeared among the “Occupy Wall Street” protesters in New York City, photos and videos of the left-wing mini-throngs indicate they suffer from a serious lack of diversity. And the protesters themselves told The Daily Caller on Tuesday that they are conscious of the issue, if not the inconsistency it demonstrates.
A 40-photo Washington Post slideshow showing hundreds of angry protesters in New York and other cities includes no more than 15 clearly identifiable minority protesters, and just six African-Americans. The rest of the protesters shown are white, and most are male.
In 26 photos from San Francisco and Chicago gatherings posted on OccupyTogether.org, only one person from a minority group is clearly visible, and it’s unclear whether he is a protester or a bystander.
Minority groups are similarly underrepresented in photos and videos posted on OccupyWallSt.org, the self-described “unofficial de facto online resource for the ongoing protests happening on Wall Street.”

Malkin and Gainor also told TheDC that while news organizations have failed to report on these protesters’ lack of minority representation, tea party rallies attracted accusations of racism for what some reporters perceived was a similar lack of racial diversity.
“The liberal media will only engage in racial bean-counting of protest crowds when it serves their political ends: Namely, painting the Right as homogenous and non-inclusive,” Malkin said. “We heard endless derision about the tea party’s lack of skin-color diversity from Hollywood and the national press. But not a peep about the Abercrombie & Fitch-meets-Apple central casting mob swamping lower Manhattan.”
Gainor added that mainstream media representatives “only see what they want to see.” He said reporters scoured tea party rallies for evidence of racism, while failing to notice how “white” the left-wing crowds are.

http://news.yahoo.com/99-occupy-wall-street-organizers-look-minorities-200105971.html

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     I thought the N.R. article seemed well-researched and to the point, and I thought it raised some interesting questions as to how the selection was made for which companies should be selected for aid.  

     I thought the article's point, however, was that green energy alternatives shouldn't be funded, and that seemed to me to be a mistake.   Each of the examples cited seemed a clear case of a cat in a blender.  It's nobody's pet any more.  Each case seemed to be headed in that direction from the beginning, and that's particularly disturbing, though no more disturbing than the occasional Republican free enterprise energy fiasco, and drastically less disturbing than some.  You can probably spell ENRON as well as I can, and the addition of all these problems together doesn't even total the price of admission to the damages done by ENRON.

     ENRON doesn't make any of this Democratic disaster one bit better, though it makes me feel better simply to suggest that this screw up isn't the worst set of choices  since the disposable paper towel submarine hull.  

     Disposable!  Recycleable! Environmentally sound!  What cound go wrong?

     Never mind.

     We still need to fund green energy and green energy research.  Having some guys with a somewhat better notion of business sense would help.

     Thanks for the article.
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70 posted 10-10-2011 09:22 PM       View Profile for Denise   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Denise

Those on the left didn't go out of their way to create a joke about the Tea Party, Bob, and it was only funny because the Tea Party had unknowningly signed up to become the butt of a joke, and that those on the left who started using the term did not mean to be crass and cruel? Okie-Dokie!

The demographics from what I have seen appear to be misguided college-age students being taken advantage of by communist and union organizations, with a shout-out of support from the Administration AND Hugo Chavez! But hey, aren't we all socialists/communists now?!

They also appear to be 99.99% White. Ooops. Does that mean they are RACIST?!

I didn't say the 'Occupiers' were freeloaders, though some may well be. According to an ad in Craigs List some are even being paid to be there. So I guess for some of them it's a temporary job...or according to Nancy Pelosi's dictionary....a spontaneous grass roots movement...lol.

A couple of people interviewed said they were there mostly for the free sex and cheap drugs. That would roughly equate with the number of people that I saw in pictures at Tea Party events wearing straw hats with tea bags dangling from them.

What made me think of 'freebaggers' was that many were asking for 'free' stuff from the government, and because it rhymes with 'teabaggers'.

I said that it wasn't as insulting as 'teabaggers' I didn't say anything about my intent, one way or the other! But yes, it did amuse me!
Balladeer
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71 posted 10-10-2011 09:28 PM       View Profile for Balladeer   Email Balladeer   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit Balladeer's Home Page   View IP for Balladeer

Here's another lesson on how to be hypocritical without really trying..
http://dailycaller.com/2011/10/10/obama-attacks-banks-while-raking-in-wall-street-dough/
Bob K
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72 posted 10-10-2011 10:13 PM       View Profile for Bob K   Email Bob K   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Bob K


quote:

Minority groups are similarly underrepresented in photos and videos posted on OccupyWallSt.org, the self-described “unofficial de facto online resource for the ongoing protests happening on Wall Street.”

Even the “unofficial” organizers of the protest events admit this is — or at least appears to be — problematic.

“That’s an interesting question, and it comes up often,” OccupyWallSt.org’s Patrick Bruner said in an email to TheDC. “Unfortunately, we have a very high turnover rate, and nobody as of yet has come up with official diversity related statistics for us. From observation, I can tell you that we’re not all white, and that we also have a huge LGBT [Lesbian Gay Bisexual and Transgender] population.”

“We’re working on reaching out to minority groups as well,” Bruner adds. “Thanks for the food for thought, I’m sorry I don’t have more exact information for you right now.” (RELATED: ‘Occupy Wall Street’ protesters are demanding … something)

The protesters have taken to calling themselves the “99 percent” in the country, labeling the capitalists they wish to remove from power the other “1 percent.” Conservative columnist Michelle Malkin told TheDC that the Occupy Wall Street protesters’ self-description as the “99 percent” in America is ironic because the crowds are mostly white.

“When Occupy Wall Street activists call themselves the ‘99 percent,’ it turns out they mean 99 percent non-diverse (by their own politically correct measurements),” Malkin said in an email.

“It’s as pale out there at Camp Alinsky as MSNBC’s prime-time lineup or the New York Times editorial board.  Not counting the cameos by Jesse Jackson and Cornel West, that is.”
Read more: http://dailycaller.com/2011/10/04/99-what-occupy-wall-street-organizers-look-for-minorities/#ixzz1aQsNow6b



     More from the article you were quoting, Mike.

     I'd suggest to you that what you have is still problematic.  The Daily Caller quotes Ms. Malkin as "Conservative columnist Michelle Malkin,"  which doesn't make her wrong or mean that her comments aren't interesting, but do mean that Patrick Bruner's comment was probably closer to reality when "he said in an email to TheDC.

quote:


'Unfortunately, we have a very high turnover rate, and nobody as of yet has come up with official diversity related statistics for us.'



     Ms. Malkin's observations may be accurate, but they are not research demographics, which need a different kind of sampling.

     For example, in looking at the brief selection of photos on the previous page, I notice that most of them are actually photos of individuals or couples in sharp focus or individuals or couples in focus in a blurred crowd.  These photos, for the most part, do nor offer us information about the crowd, only what the photographer found interesting, striking, distinctive and possibly attractive.  In the single photo that I found that was actually of a crowd I found a male African American and a female African American and a distinctively African American hand sticking in from the right frame of the picture, for a total of three African Americans in a single photograph offered at random as being the single in focus crowd scene available for me to look at right here.  I also saw what appeared to be an ethnically Chinese guy.  I couldn't tell if there were native-American or Latin folk there.

     This photo could be a curve breaker or it could be more representative of the curve.  We don't know because we don't have a decent sample size and we haven't set up the proper criteria from screening the photos.  This is why I said earlier that I didn't think we had the demographics available, and this is why I still believe that the statement is true.

     It doesn't mean Mike has come to a wrong conclusion.

     I don't know if Mike has come to a wrong conclusion or the right conclusion.  I do know that what he's basing his conclusion on is junk data, any conclusion based on it would be correct pretty much by accident, at least scientifically speaking.

     Perhaps somebody can correct me, and I'm running on misinformation here, but I'm pretty sure I'm on the money.

     I've gotten a better understanding of what the 99 percenter means now.  It's a description of anybody who's not in the economic top 1% who own so much of the property and economy and who pay, relatively speaking, an unfairly light burden in taxes.

     I too would feel more comfortable if the proportion of the population at these demonstrations was more obviously well distributed, by the way, by race and gender and age.  That's one of the reasons a decent set of demographics would be so useful.  I'd like to know if my perceptions and the reality of the situation were in agreement or not.
Denise
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73 posted 10-10-2011 10:25 PM       View Profile for Denise   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Denise

Craigs List Ad:
http://newyork.craigslist.org/brk/gov/2618821815.html
Denise
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74 posted 10-10-2011 10:42 PM       View Profile for Denise   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Denise

Patrick Gaspard's organization (he's the 'Karl Rove' of the Obama Administration) is behind the Craigs List Ad. I'm SHOCKED I tell you, simply SHOCKED! Actually nothing shocks me anymore. Not since we entered the Twilight Zone.

http://www.thegatewaypundit.com/2011/10/shocker-obamas-top-political-advisor-directly-linked-to-occupy-wall-street-protests/
 
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