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Makes Census to Me

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Grinch
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25 posted 04-04-2010 12:19 PM       View Profile for Grinch   Email Grinch   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Grinch


If you look at the provisions in the bill Denise I believe youíll find that Fox news got their facts wrong.

.
Denise
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26 posted 04-04-2010 01:42 PM       View Profile for Denise   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Denise

You'll have to point me to the particular provisions in the law that you are referring to that Fox has wrong, Grinch. It's not exactly a document with a just a few pages in it that the ordianry person can easily refer to. Does the law say that the tax credits last longer than for the first two years after joing a SHOP?
JenniferMaxwell
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27 posted 04-04-2010 02:16 PM       View Profile for JenniferMaxwell   Email JenniferMaxwell   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for JenniferMaxwell

Another case of spreading Fox News misinformation without first checking out the facts?
Grinch
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28 posted 04-04-2010 02:18 PM       View Profile for Grinch   Email Grinch   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Grinch


You havenít read the bill Denise?

I find that quite astonishing given its importance and your obvious opposition to it, how do you know what it contains and what you donít like about it if you havenít even read it?

My suggestion is that you donít take the word of other people, including mine, read the bill and if you have any issues with the contents post the relevant sections and Iíll be happy to discuss them.

.
Denise
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29 posted 04-04-2010 06:17 PM       View Profile for Denise   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Denise

I've told you before, several times, Grinch, that I have attempted to read it, and have read a great deal, but certainly not all 2700 pages. That doesn't mean that it is easy to understand with all the legalese. Congressional members themselves have said they would need to sit with an attorney to attempt to understand it. If you have a copy of the section that you are saying that Fox News has interpreted incorrectly, it would be helpful if you shared it with me so that I can see what you are talking about.
rwood
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30 posted 04-06-2010 10:48 AM       View Profile for rwood   Email rwood   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for rwood

quote:
Now the large percentage of small business that do NOT provide health insurance for their few employees, of what benefit is the tax credit? In the above case, right now they would pay nothing. If they offer health insurance and receive the tax credit, they will still pay 54,000. What do you think they would choose to do?


Great question, Mike.

It seems that many people are overlooking this quandary. In essence, the Government just slapped a growth cap on a large amount of small businesses, especially new businesses that are still in the start-up stages of gaining a foothold.

The $54k is equivalent to a nice salary to many small business owner/operators (and most struggle to achieve & exceed that amount themselves in the start-up years.)  Even half that much is tough to budget out to a new employee, but thatís where one starts investing in ďhelp,Ē and if the business does well, more help is hired or current help gets a raise in wages. Everyone grows, but the process is a bit slow in small towns or areas with heavy competition.

Unfortunately, many small businesses that would have hired a new employee or two this year wonít be hiring due to the health insurance issues. This doesnít sound like it really matters in the large scope of things, but small businesses contribute to a LARGE percentage of employment. They are very powerful in helping citizens make the most of where it is they call home.

Small businesses also do not usually operate on hefty figurative up-front costs with the expectations of getting a credit once they file taxes. This can ruin them during the slow months. I live in an area that has many seasonal industries: Farming, tourism, landscaping, construction, etc. And the ďset-in-stoneĒ policies are too risky to budget out or depend on the Gov for a ďcreditĒ or any one of the numerous species of subsidies or debt relief programs. Itís sort of a ďcount yer chickens before they are injected with growth hormonesĒ type of risk.

Businesses should never have been expected to provide insurance to employees, but the people got/get what they wanted and then they cry out because thereís a lack of jobs. Insert bullet into foot.

For those able bodies that think they should be provided for and feel they have not been sufficiently by their view? Maybe they can start their own business and see what itís like to PROVIDE instead of being a constant recipient, for a change.

Myself? I am an entrepreneur! Despite political policy, propaganda, and pools of pitiful revenues, I have hired one employee this season. We shall overcome!

And your entry post? I suspect that Celgard (without even doing any research) has had a surge in business/hiring due to the demand contracts of the MILITARY, which makes sense, and which also means their surge in job creations has less to do with Obama and everything to do with Afghanistan.  
JenniferMaxwell
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31 posted 04-06-2010 11:59 AM       View Profile for JenniferMaxwell   Email JenniferMaxwell   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for JenniferMaxwell

I always wondered how did it start, employers providing health care insurance. Was it an attempt to keep from having to pay higher wages, offering a wilted carrot large companies could buy from the discount bin instead of doling out a few extra bucks in the pay packet?
Ringo
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32 posted 04-06-2010 10:24 PM       View Profile for Ringo   Email Ringo   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Ringo

The funny thing about the health care plan that the Administration has championed, and that everyone is screaming about (pro or con), and that the liberals are saying will allow people to get health care if they don't have insurance....
Hmmmm.... it seems to me that the Emmergency Medical Treatment and Active Labor Act requires an emergency room to provide care for a patient who is in need of it...
As it covers a large part of what the Democrats are screaming about (and the Republicans are screaming just as loudly at), and as it was introduced in 1986 under a Republican President... no one seems to be mentioning it.
I wonder why?

Before you get started, read the entire post, and notice I did not, in fact, mention standard, routine "I have a cough but no fever... give me drugs" or "I have a headache because the kid is playing the music too loud, give me percocets" style of medicine. That is the responsibilty of the local family doctor, many of whom are willing to provide payment options as long as you let them know in advance and are willing to work with them. The majority of the people this thing is going to "give medical care" to are eligible for Medicade/Medicare... but still, we need to pass a law allowing the people I have described in the entirety of this thread to gain the medical coverage that they are already entitled to.
The only ones who are going to be truly helped are the working poor who are making too much for medical assistance, and are not making enough to pay for their employer's medical insurance... oh, wait, the new law says that the employer has to provide the medical insurance... I don't remember... does the employer hold the responsibility of covering the entire cost of premiums, or is the employee required to pay for it? Which leaeds us back to where we started... people truly needing the help not being able to get it... or businesses shutting down becauase they are required to provide insurance for the employees and making the decision to close their doors rather than go bankrupt paying for health care.

The winner: THE GOVERNMENT!

Game, Set, Match

Life's journey is not to arrive at the grave safely in a well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, totally worn out, shouting, "WHAT A RIDE

Bob K
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33 posted 04-06-2010 11:01 PM       View Profile for Bob K   Email Bob K   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Bob K



     My understanding is that the employee pays half.

     It's nice that the Republicans did something for health care, and they should be congratulated.  I'm glad they did it, as are many others.  When I go ahead to say why that's not enough, please don't take that as my being ungrateful for what we've already got with that Republican contribution.  I'm simply going ahead to talk about why we've needed more.

     The care that the law mandated was care for people below a certain income level.  The care that you're talking about was available at emergency rooms.  

     Emergency rooms are a wonderful source of a certain kind of care.  That's why they're called Emergency Rooms:  they do their best work for emergencies.  They are very expensive to run, and clogging them up with people needing other than Emergency Care makes them less effecient at their primary role.  They have to sort through people with sniffles and colds who have no regular doctors and who are using the ER as a substitute because regular doctors do not take them on.

     The result is that their experiences in the ER are very unpleasant, and they don't get what is called continuity of care.  TRhe staff, which is used to seeing a patient just once, for a single emergency, is not used to following patients for long term care.  The services these poor patients get, then, is sub-standard, and the various illnesses that a visit to a regular doctor would catch as a matter of course don't get caught.  This means that the illnesses of these poor patients tend to be more serious and have a poorer prognosis and to have a more expensive course of treatment than the illnesses of patients who have regular doctors and who are seen regularly.

     Because their visits are to the ER, it also means that it is likely that follow up visits may be to different doctors, who may not agree with the course of treatment the patient is already following and the treatment tends to be scattershot and ineffective.  That's why the model before the current health care bill is not good.

     That doesn't mean that the new health care bill is as good as the system in the UK or the Canadian system.  I don't think it is.  But it's an improvement over what we have, even if it's not a huge improvement.

     If the employer believes that the costs of the health care is too high, it's certain;ly his right to divide up the compensation package as he sees fit, isn't it, as long as he's not falling under other legislation that would come to bear, such as minimum wage laws.  The insurance package is part of the employee compensation package, after all.

     Part of the issue is competitive.  As in everything else, you must compete for employees.  If you want good employees, you must decide if you want them badly enough to pay for them.  If you want to build cars, you must decide if you want to build cars badly enough to pay for building the engines as well.  Employees are simply another cost factor in the cost of doing business.  It's normal to scream about the cost of steel, and it's normal to scream about the cost of insurance, but the way that we're paying for our insurance now is not effecient.  In many other industrialized countries, the state pays that cost through taxes.  

     We need to bring our costs down by finding ways to improve our insurance coverage for more people more cheaply.  We've only just begun.
rwood
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34 posted 04-08-2010 08:45 AM       View Profile for rwood   Email rwood   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for rwood

quote:
I always wondered how did it start, employers providing health care insurance. Was it an attempt to keep from having to pay higher wages, offering a wilted carrot large companies could buy from the discount bin instead of doling out a few extra bucks in the pay packet?


Ah, the fringe benefits and the perks!

The perks are/were Incentives that secured the loyalty of valuable employees. And in answer to your question, No: Perks are nothing new as even the rank of Knighthood had its perks, but the general inception of certain health care incentives in America was due to Gov regulation. Companies were not able to give pay raises so they created incentives.

ďThe term "fringe benefits" was coined by the War Labor Board during World War II to describe the various indirect benefits which industry had devised to attract and retain labor when direct wage increases were prohibited.Ē wiki~

Looks like it was the government who put a cap on wages, and perks were the private sectorís answer to remaining competitive within regulation.

Instead of the perks wilting after the war? They got more contractual & creative.

The corporate world can truly be a magical place of the ďgolden frostingĒ on a cake. If one stands to be a highly sought after individual in the cut-throat private sectors of our nation, thereís no amount of perks unavailable to him or her.

Obscene wages, PLUS medical, dental, optical, retirement, stock options, acupuncture, meals, travel, vacation, manicures, season tickets & suites at their favorite arenas, country club memberships, spas, golf or tennis packets, Botox, mocha lattes, drivers, assistants, legal representation, private personal trainers, secured enrollment in the private school of their choice for their children, a private plane, and of course the biggest house on the hill.

Iíve seen it all provided by the company and more and what a joy it is, until the company folds. All it takes is one little oversight that creates a regulatory conflict of interest and BAM, the IRS seizes everything: which is the ultimate reigning power-perk of the Gov.

Interestingly, too, throughout the history of employment, how so many things began being received for so much less work.

Iím surprised we are not in a complete standstill with productivity. Or are we?


JenniferMaxwell
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35 posted 04-08-2010 10:20 AM       View Profile for JenniferMaxwell   Email JenniferMaxwell   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for JenniferMaxwell

Thanks for the info on the history of perks, I appreciate it.
Bob K
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36 posted 04-09-2010 02:40 AM       View Profile for Bob K   Email Bob K   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Bob K



     My understanding is that while productivity of the American worker has continued to climb, the worker's real wages peaked in 1972 and have been declining ever since.  The obscene wages may be in actuality obscene bonuses, which have very much gotten out of proportion with the actual wages paid to folks who do the actual non-managerial labor.  But the wages paid on the average to folks who aren't managerial have dropped.

     I'd be interested in knowing where you got your labor statistics?  I heard mine on the radio, so I'll have to do some further checking.  Where'd you get yours?
Bob K
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37 posted 04-09-2010 02:44 AM       View Profile for Bob K   Email Bob K   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Bob K


Here's one source, 1947-2000:
http://www.workinglife.org/wiki/index.php?page=REAL+WAGES++1947-2000


It's a start.
Denise
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38 posted 04-09-2010 06:16 AM       View Profile for Denise   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Denise

More stuff coming out from the Healthcare law. Fact or fiction.....a 3.8% tax on the sale of all homes to go to help pay for the healthcare costs? (sorry don't have time to lug out all 2700 pages just this minute)

I didn't know that poeple who made less than $250,000 didn't sell houses.
JenniferMaxwell
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39 posted 04-09-2010 10:15 AM       View Profile for JenniferMaxwell   Email JenniferMaxwell   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for JenniferMaxwell

Is there a prize for knowing the correct answer? If so I'll tell, if not, oh well, shouldn't take you too long to go through all those 2700 pages.
rwood
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40 posted 04-09-2010 11:17 AM       View Profile for rwood   Email rwood   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for rwood

Youíre welcome, Jennifer. Perquisites are exquisite!!


Mr. Bob,

quote:
My understanding is that while productivity of the American worker has continued to climb, the worker's real wages peaked in 1972 and have been declining ever since.


Could this be most true due to American workers buying from the competition? Supply & Demand being met by China & Japan?

quote:
The obscene wages may be in actuality obscene bonuses, which have very much gotten out of proportion with the actual wages paid to folks who do the actual non-managerial labor.


Well, I donít know anyone who would file a grievance if he or she is sitting in the receiving chair when such a lucrative offer is tabled, and the really wonderful superiors share the experience.

I mean, I know of a time there was a request filed for board review that might alter the provisions offered on a perk: Spa package in exchange for a Golf package, since the employee had no interest in Golf. And she received it, accordingly, with a nightís stay at the hotel of her choice due to the expense of Golf being much more than the expense of the Spa treatment. The package was extended to employees of non-managerial positions if they participated in helping said superior meet the goals necessary!

People do choose what line of work they are in, what chair they compete for, and whether they ultimately sign-on for labor, clerical, & management positions.

quote:
But the wages paid on the average to folks who aren't managerial have dropped.


In reference to productivity, people are definitely pushed to meet demands when the demands are there. Where are Da Mands going??

Again, I think this is market-reflective of productivity from foreign suppliers that donít even viciously compete with our markets, but sell sell sell they do to us, even with their eyes closed--those blasted buggers! AND this is also reflective of investment, whether itís in oneís self, oneís business, interests or goods, and as a group/whole.

So many things are reflective of said drop in productivity/wages. Iím having a very hard time finding shoes & coffee cups that are not made in China or Taiwan! THREE CHEERS FOR NEW BALANCE & CORNINGWARE/CORELLE!! Incidentally, the shoes I wear are usually indicative of how I make food happen upon the table. If Iím barefooted too long? Bare cupboards happen. So much for being a professional hillbilly.


But the chart is Great! Those stats give an idea, especially in relative pace with inflation, but I highly doubt itís an absolute account of private sector dealings with payroll (how employers creatively manage the weight of inflation, or how inflation is creatively manipulated for reporting) for too many reasons to hash, but hereís a few:

1.Overtime is often paid in cash.
2.The convenient 90-day probation period.
3.Loopholes & trends that confuse reporting.


Must take a hike now. The weather is too awesome to imagine!!

Peace!

reg
Grinch
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41 posted 04-09-2010 04:39 PM       View Profile for Grinch   Email Grinch   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Grinch


quote:
Fact or fiction.....a 3.8% tax on the sale of all homes to go to help pay for the healthcare costs?


Fiction.

.
Bob K
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42 posted 04-09-2010 07:20 PM       View Profile for Bob K   Email Bob K   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Bob K

Bob says:
quote:
My understanding is that while productivity of the American worker has continued to climb, the worker's real wages peaked in 1972 and have been declining ever since.
[/quote]


Reg. Replies:
quote:

Could this be most true due to American workers buying from the competition? Supply & Demand being met by China & Japan?



     This would not account for increasing productivity from American workers, would it?

     Nor would it account for American employers relocating overseas to become the competitors.  Dropping tariffs that had previously protected American goods and workers would account for some of that, though.  Failure for the US to have a state run health system might account for some of that.  Countries with such systems, such as Japan, have been able to produce goods more cheaply.

     American companies have relocated to take advantage of these price breaks in production, hoping that American workers would still provide a steady market for the goods they produce.  This only works so long as the cost of the goods remains cheaper than the diminishing salaries of the workers they've abandoned will support this decision.  Afterward, it's economic suicide.

Bob said:
quote:
The obscene wages may be in actuality obscene bonuses, which have very much gotten out of proportion with the actual wages paid to folks who do the actual non-managerial labor.
[/quote]

[Reg Replies"
quote:

Well, I donít know anyone who would file a grievance if he or she is sitting in the receiving chair when such a lucrative offer is tabled, and the really wonderful superiors share the experience.

I mean, I know of a time there was a request filed for board review that might alter the provisions offered on a perk: Spa package in exchange for a Golf package, since the employee had no interest in Golf. And she received it, accordingly, with a nightís stay at the hotel of her choice due to the expense of Golf being much more than the expense of the Spa treatment. The package was extended to employees of non-managerial positions if they participated in helping said superior meet the goals necessary!

People do choose what line of work they are in, what chair they compete for, and whether they ultimately sign-on for labor, clerical, & management positions.



     The part of what you say here that I can follow is that people choose what job they hold.  

     I say to you that's hogwash.

     At the very best, people can choose a general direction, and luck and ability and hard work play a major factor after that.  Don't tell me that you chose to be an entrepreneur.  I don't believe it.  What I believe is that you chose to be a wealthy and successful entrepreneur, not somebody who has trouble keeping her head above water.  I could be wrong, but my theory is that few people chose to be somebody who's barely getting along, either working for somebody else or working for themselves.

     Those who are fortunate, make it big.  

     The great invention that America has come up with is the middle class.  You can join the middle class, the dream says, if you work hard, save, and live right; and from the end of the second world war until recently this has been so.  Even as a worker, if you joined a union, middle class living was a possibility for you, and this supplied America with a whole class of folks who were proud to go to work at GM or at GE or wherever, even in Coal Mines, because they felt like they were partners in what was going on and because they felt they had a right to be treated right.

     I can't say that is the case any longer.


Bob said:
quote:
But the wages paid on the average to folks who aren't managerial have dropped.
[/quote]


And Reg replied:
quote:

In reference to productivity, people are definitely pushed to meet demands when the demands are there. Where are Da Mands going??

Again, I think this is market-reflective of productivity from foreign suppliers that donít even viciously compete with our markets, but sell sell sell they do to us, even with their eyes closed--those blasted buggers! AND this is also reflective of investment, whether itís in oneís self, oneís business, interests or goods, and as a group/whole.

So many things are reflective of said drop in productivity/wages. Iím having a very hard time finding shoes & coffee cups that are not made in China or Taiwan! THREE CHEERS FOR NEW BALANCE & CORNINGWARE/CORELLE!! Incidentally, the shoes I wear are usually indicative of how I make food happen upon the table. If Iím barefooted too long? Bare cupboards happen. So much for being a professional hillbilly.



     I have no idea what you're talking about in terms of being a barefoot Hillbilly.

     I know you're right about the drop in wages from 1972 to the present.

     Why you insist on saying otherwise is beyond my understanding.  Why, then, do you persist in saying otherwise?


Reg says:
quote:


But the chart is Great! Those stats give an idea, especially in relative pace with inflation, but I highly doubt itís an absolute account of private sector dealings with payroll (how employers creatively manage the weight of inflation, or how inflation is creatively manipulated for reporting) for too many reasons to hash, but hereís a few:

1.Overtime is often paid in cash.
2.The convenient 90-day probation period.
3.Loopholes & trends that confuse reporting.



     The chart was adjusted for inflation.

     Whether overtime is paid in cash or not, for what you suggest here to make any difference at all, there would have had to have been a change in policy for that payment after 1972 for it to show up in the figures.  Unless you can demonstrate such a national payment policy shift over that period of time, when union influence has taken a nose-dive, then there would be little to support such an assumption.

     The 90 day probationary period is supposed to affect the overall payment in exactly what way?

     And the loopholes and trends that confuse reporting have proved different than the loopholes and trends prior to 1972 in exactly which way so that they would appear to distort the amount of money being paid out in a downward fashion.  Were this in fact the case, we would have a situation where, as in 1972, it would be more common for a single wage earner to be able to support a household.  Instead, we now have a situation where it is more common for there to be two wage earners needed to support a household, and even then, the household seems to be stressed in order to make ends meet.

     Sorry, Reg, I don't think what you say is accurate.  Your speculations are interesting, but they need to be buttressed with more reasoning and more facts to be more convincing, in my opinion at least.


Must take a hike now. The weather is too awesome to imagine!!

Peace!

reg
Denise
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43 posted 04-09-2010 08:32 PM       View Profile for Denise   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Denise

Thanks Grinch. I was looking around and found some information that was talking about investment real estate being taxed upon sale, as well as capital gains. So I didn't know if that would apply to all property sold at a certain profit margin or strictly just real estate that is not someone's primary residence that would be taxed upon sale.
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44 posted 04-09-2010 11:14 PM       View Profile for Balladeer   Email Balladeer   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit Balladeer's Home Page   View IP for Balladeer

Why you insist on saying otherwise is beyond my understanding.  Why, then, do you persist in saying otherwise?

Yes, Regina, why are you doing that to ole Bob? It's irritating to him....and, since you are inaccurate, according to him...why waste his time?
Bob K
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45 posted 04-10-2010 01:49 AM       View Profile for Bob K   Email Bob K   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Bob K



     There is no doubt that Bob can be something of a stuffed shirt from time to time.  It's one of the nice things that I have, to be able to count on you to writ me about it when you see it, Mike.  Thanks.
rwood
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46 posted 04-10-2010 10:05 AM       View Profile for rwood   Email rwood   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for rwood

Mr. Bob.

I believe weíre disagreeing on productivity.

You say productivity has increased while wages have decreased.

I said: throughout the history of employment, how so many things began being received for so much less work. Iím surprised we are not in a complete standstill with productivity.

Wages PLUS benefits, bonuses, PERKS, etc. All that for 40 hours, when the work week was much longer than that with no overtime and demands seemed much grander for our own products than foreign products, once upon a time.

I agree. Relocation is a definite problem. Weíve had several of our factories head to Mexico. But, I donít know how state run insurance would make us more secure in the job place? Our industry here depends on demand. And if we get any cheaper in our manufacturing of Corvette pistons (for example) the Corvette might as well be a Chevette.Maybe they already are. I don't know.

Sure, you can wash yer hog if you want to, we do it around here all the time, but I am quite sure I chose every single position that Iíve held within my history of employment. What you really wouldnít believe is how many different directions Iíve chosen and how many jobs Iíve held at the same time. If I hadnít struggled to make things happen, thereís a wealth of experience Iíd missed out on. But, I still have the most important things I started with: The Grace of God and a crazy schtick.

Lordi mercy, Iím sorry, Mr. Bob. I was revealing some of my conflicting personal affections to you:  Shoes and being a barefooted hillbilly. I invest in shoes. They matter. Especially on that hike I took, yesterday. But oh how sublime it is to dig my toes into fresh green grass!!

Anywho, when did I insist on wages dropping since 1972?? Why are you insisting that Iíve persisted to insist? Have I missed something?

And my reference to overtime? Mr. Bob? Cash doesnít show up correctly in the figures. Thatís the point and the purpose of CASH.

90 probationary period means youíre not officially on payroll. They can pay you whatever they want from numerous company funds and let you go prior to the deadline date so not to cover you with insurances or a real starting wage. A factory worker can work at a different factory every 90 days and the wages are not that of full-time employees, but they do get reported, which would cause a drop in payroll figures as a whole.

Of course Iím not accurate! I think itís impossible to be accurate on the likes of wage stats with reporting, and the best problems and stats people become high-paid CEOs and executive accountants. Distortion of figures seems to be their forte. Loopholes and trends are their best friends!

In reference to making ends meet in whatever household? I agree the need is more common for two wage earners to support a household. But Iím guessing we didnít have Plasma TVís with 500 channels, cell phones, Ipods, 3 or 4 cars, GPS systems, laptops, kids wearing designer clothes from birth, $11 movie ticket prices, dining out each day, yada yado, back in 1972 to present. Some feel that they have no life without those things, so maybe the struggle is also a matter of priority or values?  

But I didnít have the security of a second wager earner in my household. I am proof that a single-wage earner can make it, with two kids, without welfare assistance. And Iíve not done as well as some of my friends and family members or other people I admire from a distance.


It's ok, Mr. Bob. You can be a stuffed shirt and I'll put on shoes. We need both to shop around here or NO SERVICE!
Bob K
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since 11-03-2007
Posts 3860


47 posted 04-10-2010 03:58 PM       View Profile for Bob K   Email Bob K   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Bob K



    
Dear Reg.

          Here's some hard data:
http://www.bls.gov/schedule/archives/prod_nr.htm#2009


I'm rushed right now, so I didn't look for it in table form, but you should be able to check it out pretty well from the year to year and quarter to quarter archives kept here.  The definition of "Produuctivity" is included, so we won't need to shout past each other, and we can talk about the same stuff, I hope.

     Thanks for taking the time,  I do appreciate your curiosity.  Mr. Bob
 
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