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Balladeer
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175 posted 04-05-2010 12:05 AM       View Profile for Balladeer   Email Balladeer   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit Balladeer's Home Page   View IP for Balladeer

You are surprised that MLK was a Republican, Bob? How could he be anything else?

It should come as no surprise that Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was a Republican. In that era, almost all black Americans were Republicans. Why? From its founding in 1854 as the anti-slavery party until today, the Republican Party has championed freedom and civil rights for blacks. And as one pundit so succinctly stated, the Democrat Party is as it always has been, the party of the four S's: slavery, secession, segregation and now socialism.

It was the Democrats who fought to keep blacks in slavery and passed the discriminatory Black Codes and Jim Crow laws. The Democrats started the Ku Klux Klan to lynch and terrorize blacks. The Democrats fought to prevent the passage of every civil rights law beginning with the civil rights laws of the 1860s, and continuing with the civil rights laws of the 1950s and 1960s.

During the civil rights era of the 1960s, Dr. King was fighting the Democrats who stood in the school house doors, turned skin-burning fire hoses on blacks and let loose vicious dogs. It was Republican President Dwight Eisenhower who pushed to pass the Civil Rights Act of 1957 and sent troops to Arkansas to desegregate schools. President Eisenhower also appointed Chief Justice Earl Warren to the U.S. Supreme Court, which resulted in the 1954 Brown v. Board of Education decision ending school segregation. Much is made of Democrat President Harry Truman's issuing an Executive Order in 1948 to desegregate the military. Not mentioned is the fact that it was Eisenhower who actually took action to effectively end segregation in the military.


Democrat President John F. Kennedy is lauded as a proponent of civil rights. However, Kennedy voted against the 1957 Civil Rights Act while he was a senator, as did Democrat Sen. Al Gore Sr. And after he became President, Kennedy was opposed to the 1963 March on Washington by Dr. King that was organized by A. Phillip Randolph, who was a black Republican. President Kennedy, through his brother Atty. Gen. Robert Kennedy, had Dr. King wiretapped and investigated by the FBI on suspicion of being a Communist in order to undermine Dr. King.

In March of 1968, while referring to Dr. King's leaving Memphis, Tenn., after riots broke out where a teenager was killed, Democrat Sen. Robert Byrd (W.Va.), a former member of the Ku Klux Klan, called Dr. King a "trouble-maker" who starts trouble, but runs like a coward after trouble is ignited. A few weeks later, Dr. King returned to Memphis and was assassinated on April 4, 1968.

Given the circumstances of that era, it is understandable why Dr. King was a Republican. It was the Republicans who fought to free blacks from slavery and amended the Constitution to grant blacks freedom (13th Amendment), citizenship (14th Amendment) and the right to vote (15th Amendment). Republicans passed the civil rights laws of the 1860s, including the Civil Rights Act of 1866 and the Reconstruction Act of 1867 that was designed to establish a new government system in the Democrat-controlled South, one that was fair to blacks. Republicans also started the NAACP and affirmative action with Republican President Richard Nixon's 1969 Philadelphia Plan (crafted by black Republican Art Fletcher) that set the nation's fist goals and timetables. Although affirmative action now has been turned by the Democrats into an unfair quota system, affirmative action was begun by Nixon to counter the harm caused to blacks when Democrat President Woodrow Wilson in 1912 kicked all of the blacks out of federal government jobs.

Few black Americans know that it was Republicans who founded the Historically Black Colleges and Universities. Unknown also is the fact that Republican Sen. Everett Dirksen from Illinois was key to the passage of civil rights legislation in 1957, 1960, 1964 and 1965. Not mentioned in recent media stories about extension of the 1965 Voting Rights Act is the fact that Dirksen wrote the language for the bill. Dirksen also crafted the language for the Civil Rights Act of 1968 which prohibited discrimination in housing. President Lyndon Johnson could not have achieved passage of civil rights legislation without the support of Republicans.
http://www.humanevents.com/article.php?id=16500
    

JenniferMaxwell
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176 posted 04-05-2010 04:13 AM       View Profile for JenniferMaxwell   Email JenniferMaxwell   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for JenniferMaxwell

Bob, there’s this from Wiki. Haven’t had a chance to check the sources mentioned yet, but they’re there for anyone who wants to investigate further. Also don’t know how unbiased the author of the article, but I do know Rice and Human Events are far right sources.

“Yes, Dr. King was a republican according to his neice Dr. Alveda C. King who stated,

"My grandfather, Dr. Martin Luther King, Sr., or "Daddy King", was a Republican
and father of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. who was a Republican."
http://www.trustedpartner.com/docs/library/000143/Alveda%20King%20article.pdf.

But, not according to his son.
In a statement released through the King Center published in an AP article in July 2008 at http://www.ajc.com/metro/content/printedition/2008/07/05/kingrepublicans.html, Martin Luther King III said, "It is disingenuous to imply that my father was a Republican. He never endorsed any presidential candidate, and there is certainly no evidence that he ever even voted for a Republican. It is even more outrageous to suggest that he would support the Republican Party of today, which has spent so much time and effort trying to suppress African-American votes in Florida and many other states."
And this Wash Post article in 2006 says King actually voted for LBJ in 1964. http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/10/18/AR2006101801754.html
In fact, in "The Autobiography of Martin Luther King, Jr.," which was published after King's death from his written material and records, King called the 1964 Republican national convention that nominated Goldwater a "frenzied wedding ... of the KKK and the radical right.”


Also, worth mentioning, Bob, after skimming some misc. news items, seems there’s a push by the right to claim King as having been a Republican. Here’s an article from, sorry, Fox that touches on that: http://www.foxnews.com/politics/2009/07/14/billboard-claiming-martin-luther-king-republican-angers-black-activists-houston/
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177 posted 04-05-2010 08:43 AM       View Profile for Denise   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Denise

Thanks for the article, Michael. It's sad so many today know so little about the facts in our own history.

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178 posted 04-05-2010 09:54 AM       View Profile for Denise   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Denise

http://www.thecontract.org/2010/04/tea-party-agenda-smaller-government/
Balladeer
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179 posted 04-05-2010 10:17 AM       View Profile for Balladeer   Email Balladeer   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit Balladeer's Home Page   View IP for Balladeer

No problem, Denise. People see what they want to see.

A little known fact of history involves the heavy opposition to the civil rights movement by several prominent Democrats. Similar historical neglect is given to the important role Republicans played in supporting the civil rights movement. A calculation of 26 major civil rights votes from 1933 through the 1960's civil rights era shows that Republicans favored civil rights in approximately 96% of the votes, whereas the Democrats opposed them in 80% of the votes! These facts are often intentionally overlooked by the left wing Democrats for obvious reasons. In some cases, the Democrats have told flat out lies about their shameful record during the civil rights movement.

Democrat Senators organized the record Senate filibuster of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Included among the organizers were several prominent and well known liberal Democrat standard bearers including:
- Robert Byrd, current senator from West Virginia
- J. William Fulbright, Arkansas senator and political mentor of Bill Clinton
- Albert Gore Sr., Tennessee senator, father and political mentor of Al Gore. Gore Jr. has been known to lie about his father's opposition to the Civil Rights Act.
- Sam Ervin, North Carolina senator of Watergate hearings fame
- Richard Russell, famed Georgia senator and later President Pro Tempore

The complete list of the 21 Democrats who opposed the Civil Rights Act of 1964 includes Senators:

- Hill and Sparkman of Alabama
- Fulbright and McClellan of Arkansas
- Holland and Smathers of Florida
- Russell and Talmadge of Georgia
- Ellender and Long of Louisiana
- Eastland and Stennis of Mississippi
- Ervin and Jordan of North Carolina
- Johnston and Thurmond of South Carolina
- Gore Sr. and Walters of Tennessee
- H. Byrd and Robertson of Virginia
- R. Byrd of West Virginia

Democrat opposition to the Civil Rights Act was substantial enough to literally split the party in two. A whopping 40% of the House Democrats VOTED AGAINST the Civil Rights Act, while 80% of Republicans SUPPORTED it. Republican support in the Senate was even higher. Similar trends occurred with the Voting Rights Act of 1965, which was supported by 82% of House Republicans and 94% of Senate Republicans. The same Democrat standard bearers took their normal racists stances, this time with Senator Fulbright leading the opposition effort.

It took the hard work of Republican Senate Minority Leader Everett Dirksen and Republican Whip Thomas Kuchel to pass the Civil Rights Act (Dirksen was presented a civil rights accomplishment award for the year by the head of the NAACP in recognition of his efforts). Upon breaking the Democrat filibuster of the 1964 Civil Rights Act, Republican Dirksen took to the Senate floor and exclaimed "The time has come for equality of opportunity in sharing in government, in education, and in employment. It will not be stayed or denied. It is here!" (Full text of speech). Sadly, Democrats and revisionist historians have all but forgotten (and intentionally so) that it was Republican Dirksen, not the divided Democrats, who made the Civil Rights Act a reality. Dirksen also broke the Democrat filibuster of the 1957 Civil Rights Act that was signed by Republican President Eisenhower.

http://gopcapitalist.tripod.com/democratrecord.html


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180 posted 04-05-2010 10:23 AM       View Profile for Denise   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Denise

Rewriting history seems to be their greatest talent, Michael.

Bob, the onus is on those who claim that something happened to produce the evidence, not the other way around. And as I have already said, even on the outside chance that something did happen, a couple of nuts here and there does not define an entire movement.
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181 posted 04-05-2010 11:51 AM       View Profile for JenniferMaxwell   Email JenniferMaxwell   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for JenniferMaxwell

The Republicans are battling for the African-American/Hispanic vote. Not much time today, but will post bits as time allows.

It's obvious now why they would want to fight beyond the point of reason to deny what happened to Lewis and why teabaggers in the mob were trying to hush those booing and hurling insults at him.

The pieces come together - amazing - more Republican hypocrisy.

From the WP article mentioned in #176

By Darryl Fears
Washington Post Staff Writer
Thursday, October 19, 2006

In the battle for the black electorate, liberals, who make up the overwhelming majority of black voters, have long disagreed with conservatives over ideology, public policy and economic strategies to better the lives of African Americans. But when conservatives placed the civil rights movement in a Republican context, black liberals said, they crossed a line.

"To suggest that Martin could identify with a party that affirms preemptive, predatory war, and whose religious partners hint that God affirms war and favors the rich at the expense of the poor, is to revile Martin," said the Rev. Joseph Lowery, the former president of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, which the slain civil rights leader helped establish.

Rep. John Lewis (D-Ga.), who marched with King in the 1960s, called the ads an "insult to the legacy and the memory of Martin Luther King Jr." and "an affront to all that he stood for."

The spot, which ran for a time in the District, Georgia, Maryland, Ohio and Pennsylvania, will soon run again in those areas, as well as in Miami, Orlando and Tampa, Rice said.

In 1960, King was arrested for trespassing during a sit-in and held in Georgia's Reidsville prison. Fearing for his son's life, Martin Luther King Sr. appealed to presidential candidate John F. Kennedy to secure his release.

When King was freed, his father vowed to deliver 10 million votes to the Democrat, even though Kennedy was only a reluctant supporter of civil rights. That began four decades of black people voting for liberals.

The younger King voted for Kennedy, and for Democrat Lyndon B. Johnson four years later. In that election, King publicly denounced the Republican candidate, Barry Goldwater.

Today, the vast majority of black voters are Democrats, including former ambassador to the United Nations Andrew Young and former presidential hopeful Jesse L. Jackson, two former King aides.

That is why the ad was "a joke," said Christopher Arps, a former spokesman for Rice and the association. "Anyone with any sense knows that most black people were Republican at one time. But it's a far stretch to think that in the '60s Martin Luther King was a Republican."

Arps and Scoggins resigned from the association board last year when they disagreed with Rice on a separate issue. She wanted to support President Bush when he came under fire for his administration's slow response to Hurricane Katrina.

"In terms of what we're trying to do, encourage more blacks to look at the Republican Party, I didn't think we could do that in an in-your-face-type way," Scoggins said. "There were bodies floating in the street."

In addition to Scoggins and Arps, at least four other members resigned. Rice questioned their fortitude. The group was founded so that black conservatives could assert themselves, she said, and "when it came time to do something, some stepped back."

"It was a 'my way or the highway' sort of thing," Scoggins said. "I was crushed when this thing happened because it turned out to be completely the opposite of what I thought it would be."
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/10/18/AR2006101801754.html
Grinch
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182 posted 04-05-2010 12:02 PM       View Profile for Grinch   Email Grinch   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Grinch

Mike,

Do you think the Democrats who voted against the Civil Rights Act were honestly representing the views of their constituents?

Just a thought, but the list you supplied seems to consist of southern states that made up the Confederacy, could that be a contributing factor affecting how they voted?
I mean it’s not surprising that only 7.4% of Dem representatives from states where the populace actively opposed the legislation voted for it. How many republicans from the southern states voted for it Mike, as a percentage?

I wonder what the results from northern states were and whether they give a clearer indication of the Republican /Democratic voting trend ?

.
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183 posted 04-05-2010 12:16 PM       View Profile for Denise   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Denise

You write great fiction, Jen.
JenniferMaxwell
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184 posted 04-05-2010 12:34 PM       View Profile for JenniferMaxwell   Email JenniferMaxwell   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for JenniferMaxwell

Can we not keep this from getting personal, please? Dispute the facts, post your pov, but let's not make it personal. OK?
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185 posted 04-05-2010 12:58 PM       View Profile for Denise   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Denise

You are attempting to smear an entire movement that you happen to disagree with, on the basis of alleged incidents with nothing to back up those allegations. I call that fiction. And your good at it. And people might tend to believe you after awhile simply because you keep repeating it over and over and over again.  

JenniferMaxwell
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186 posted 04-05-2010 01:14 PM       View Profile for JenniferMaxwell   Email JenniferMaxwell   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for JenniferMaxwell

Can we not keep this from getting personal, please? Dispute the facts, post your pov, but let's not make it personal. OK?
JenniferMaxwell
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187 posted 04-05-2010 02:01 PM       View Profile for JenniferMaxwell   Email JenniferMaxwell   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for JenniferMaxwell

From the archives:

Republicans courting black America--again: as Democrats lose ground with African Americans, GOP looks to step in.

If the GOP is to attract a greater number of African Americans to its ranks, it will have to neutralize its dubious record regarding support for black interests. That would not have been such a tall order in decades past.

After the Civil War, newly freed blacks flocked to the GOP because it was the party of Abraham Lincoln, the "Great Emancipator." Most black Americans belonged to the Republican Party until the 1930s when President Franklin Delano Roosevelt included them in his New Deal programs.

Things changed in 1964, however, when Democrat Lyndon Johnson received overwhelming black support at the polls, while black voters rejected the Republican standard-bearer, Arizona Sen. Barry Goldwater.  Johnson signed the Civil Rights Act that year, but Goldwater fought to defeat the measure in Congress calling it a "states rights" matter.

Despite Goldwater's failure to win the White House, demonstrating hostility toward the interests of African Americans has since paid off for other GOP politicians. President Ronald Reagan initiated massive funding cuts to time-tested social programs that benefited people of color, working families, and the poor. His judicial appointments are part of his lasting legacy: Only six of his 385 judicial appointees were black, and all three of his Supreme Court appointees are part of the block of five conservative justices whose rulings have reversed many of the hard-won civil rights and civil liberties gains from the 1960s. While he won election to the White House convincingly in 1980 and 1984, Reagan was opposed by 90% of black voters on both occasions. Each subsequent Republican presidential candidate has received similar rejection at the polls.
http://www.thefreelibrary.com/Republicans+courting+black+Ameri ca--again:+as+Democrats+lose+ground...-a0106028342
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188 posted 04-05-2010 02:18 PM       View Profile for Denise   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Denise

I don't have to dispute the facts, Jen. Facts are facts. What I am disputing are your unsubstantiated allegations.
Essorant
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189 posted 04-05-2010 02:43 PM       View Profile for Essorant   Email Essorant   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit Essorant's Home Page   View IP for Essorant

Jennifer
Be careful with accusing people of getting "personal"  Denise said what she thinks you are doing, not what you are as a person.  And she called that "fiction", not you.   That isn't getting "personal",  unless you expect her to avoid "personal" pronouns too

JenniferMaxwell
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190 posted 04-05-2010 02:53 PM       View Profile for JenniferMaxwell   Email JenniferMaxwell   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for JenniferMaxwell

For the GOP, Michael Steele no longer "da man"
Republicans are abandoning their stripper-tainted organization, the RNC. So why won't they just fire its leader?

So if Steele's leadership is so bad that he’s forced Republicans to abandon their central party organization, why don’t they just toss the guy? This question has come up a few times since he became chairman, and there’s usually one answer: GOP leaders are afraid of how it would look for their all-white party to fire their first black leader. As one high-level operative told Politico in January, "You're not going to dump the first African-American chairman. That's the only reason. Otherwise, he'd be gone."

Here it's worth remembering the context in which Steele got the job. He came out on top of a short, intense and racially charged contest, in the immediate wake of the election of Barack Obama. Among the candidates he defeated were two different southern state Republican Party chairmen who’d revealed themselves as something less than paragons of racial egalitarianism.

The New Republic’s Jonathan Chait nailed the basic dynamic of Steele’s victory earlier this year, the last time Steele was fighting for his job: "The immediate Republican response to Obama has been to find their own black guy." Chait’s argument is that conservatives have come to believe that candidate Obama's race was an unfair boon, and so have attempted to ape liberal rhetoric and symbolism on race, but haven't appropriated any of the actual anti-racist content. The point for Republicans isn't actually to understand what racism is or where it comes from; it's to show, with an extreme level of self-consciousness, that of course they aren’t racist. Now can they please have some black votes?

http://www.salon.com/news/politics/war_room/2009/02/19/steele/index.html?source=rss&aim=/olitics/war_room

Edited to correct bad link  
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191 posted 04-05-2010 04:39 PM       View Profile for Bob K   Email Bob K   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Bob K

quote:

Democrat opposition to the Civil Rights Act was substantial enough to literally split the party in two. A whopping 40% of the House Democrats VOTED AGAINST the Civil Rights Act, while 80% of Republicans SUPPORTED it. Republican support in the Senate was even higher. Similar trends occurred with the Voting Rights Act of 1965, which was supported by 82% of House Republicans and 94% of Senate Republicans. The same Democrat standard bearers took their normal racists stances, this time with Senator Fulbright leading the opposition effort.

It took the hard work of Republican Senate Minority Leader Everett Dirksen and Republican Whip Thomas Kuchel to pass the Civil Rights Act (Dirksen was presented a civil rights accomplishment award for the year by the head of the NAACP in recognition of his efforts). Upon breaking the Democrat filibuster of the 1964 Civil Rights Act, Republican Dirksen took to the Senate floor and exclaimed "The time has come for equality of opportunity in sharing in government, in education, and in employment. It will not be stayed or denied. It is here!" (Full text of speech). Sadly, Democrats and revisionist historians have all but forgotten (and intentionally so) that it was Republican Dirksen, not the divided Democrats, who made the Civil Rights Act a reality. Dirksen also broke the Democrat filibuster of the 1957 Civil Rights Act that was signed by Republican President Eisenhower.



     Mike, you are 100% correct.

     This was in my opinion one of the finest hours of the Republican Party, and any Republican should be proud to remember them.  It was also a shameful time for the Democratic Party, and I know that I wince inside every time I think of that era.

     It is for that reason that you may be correct in asserting a Republican past for Martin Luther King, because the Democrats were very much the party that many bvlacks ideentified with slavery.  You may also be incorrect, because of FDR, Eleanor Roosevelt and the New Deal, which swayed a lot of the traditionally Republican Black voters toward the Democratic party...

     What we do know, however, and what you have not mentioned, are the events that happened after the passage of the Civil Rights act of 1964.  I know you're familiar with them because we've talked about them before in these pages.  The southern wing of the Democratic Party, the so-called Dixie-crats, was so angry at Lyndon Johnson that, almost en-masse, they changed parties and became Republicans.  All the racists crazies of the Far Right went Republican, and they took the Republican Party to the far right with them.  That is the time when they broke with the Republican party of Eisenhower and Dirkson and became the Republican Party as it sees itself today.  All those people that you speak about, and which you and I both so much admire would now be called RINOs, Republican's In Name Only for their beliefs in right-central positions, like the beliefs that Nixon held in Health Care, for example.

     So, Yes, you are right about that Proud History for Republicans.

     And yes, you are right about that shameful Democratic history.  100% right.

     Sadly, the positions of the two parties on some of these issues turned around.  If you took those votes today, I don't think they'd be the same.  Do you?
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192 posted 04-05-2010 11:10 PM       View Profile for JenniferMaxwell   Email JenniferMaxwell   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for JenniferMaxwell

Since it really doesn't appear to be a grassroots organization, by chance would anyone know who's funding it?
http://www.ragingelephants.org/
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193 posted 04-06-2010 01:01 AM       View Profile for JenniferMaxwell   Email JenniferMaxwell   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for JenniferMaxwell

Threats, Violence Against Congress Show Urgent Need for King Records Act
by Thom Hartmann and Lamar Waldron

Sunday, April 4, 2010 marks the forty-second anniversary of the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King.  The recent spate of violence and threats directed at members of Congress evoke all too well the tumult of the 1960s.  Seeing a hero of the Civil Rights movement like Rep. John  Lewis (D-Georgia) facing an angry gauntlet of protestors--some using the N-word--as he left the Capitol brought back memories of similar scenes from the 1960s, when Rep. Lewis worked with Martin Luther King.

The resurgence in violent acts and rhetoric was building even before the surge that accompanied passage of healthcare reform.  This not only includes white supremacist shootings of several police officers over the past year, but arrests in ten different states for serious plots to assassinate Obama, most by white supremacists.

Some of the large corporations and mainstream politicians stoking the anger at President Obama may not realize how quickly such an atmosphere of hate can get beyond their control.  For them, it's just a matter of money and power, by making sure populist anger that should be directed at them is instead diverted to President Obama and others.

It's been said that those who cannot remember the past are doomed to repeat it.  But thanks to Senator John Kerry (D-Mass.), Representative John Lewis, and others, Americans have a rare chance to finally bring the hidden history of Martin Luther King's assassination to light
http://www.commondreams.org/view/2010/04/05-1


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194 posted 04-06-2010 05:36 AM       View Profile for Denise   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Denise

These guys are fiction writers too!
JenniferMaxwell
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195 posted 04-06-2010 06:43 AM       View Profile for JenniferMaxwell   Email JenniferMaxwell   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for JenniferMaxwell

Crazy (R) Tea Party w/ Rep. Steve Cohen
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FFdXi3wnXyk
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     And exactly what, before you read it, Denise, do you think is fiction?

     Apparently, your unwillingness to read the health care bill hasn't kept you from telling others it's fiction, despite occasional or even repeated corrections from Grinch.  Instead, you tell him the bill is too hard to read, complain about the length of the bill, and continue to act as though you had read it by making assertions based on assumptions that get corrected by Grinch again.

    Before you speak of unpublished assertions as fiction, you would do well to familiarize yourself with what they may be.  How much could that hurt?
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197 posted 04-06-2010 11:04 AM       View Profile for Denise   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Denise

"Seeing a hero of the Civil Rights movement like Rep. John  Lewis (D-Georgia) facing an angry gauntlet of protestors--some using the N-word--as he left the Capitol..."

I was speaking of this little section.
Denise
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198 posted 04-06-2010 11:15 AM       View Profile for Denise   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Denise

You presume to know too much about me, Bob.

As for Grinch's "corrections", I see them more as his interpretaions more than anything else, for the most part. I'm still waiting for his explanation as to why Fox incorrectly interpreted the section he claims they did. But who can really be sure what it all means, or how it could be interpreted, the way it is written. Lawyers probably have a hard time understanding it. I mean, it's not exactly a straight forward, easy to understand document....like the Constitution, for instance.
JenniferMaxwell
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Straight forward, easy to understand like the Constitution, hmmm.  I wonder. If that were true wouldn't SC decisions dealing with constitutional matters be unanimous?
 
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