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Passions in Poetry

Follow Your Bliss

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Huan Yi
Member Ascendant
since 10-12-2004
Posts 6334
Waukegan


0 posted 06-29-2008 02:04 AM       View Profile for Huan Yi   Email Huan Yi   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Huan Yi

.


“Everyone with the slightest familiarity with Joseph Campbell, of course, knows the famous catch-phrase: "Follow Your Bliss". And everyone pretty much knows what it means, as well: Figure out whatever your passion is, and responsibly and diligently move forward, and pursue it... for the rest of your life... above and beyond anything else.”


http://www.amazon.com/Pathways-Bliss-Mythology-Personal-Transformation/dp/1577314719      


Yet, even when that following is without conscious deliberate harm
to anyone else, can it still be morally wrong?


Does anyone remember what it was like
in that miserable before time when the imperative
was not following your bliss but doing
the “right thing”?

This was a Boomer victory . . .
for which I am personally grateful.


John


.


[This message has been edited by Huan Yi (06-29-2008 03:19 PM).]

Stephanos
Deputy Moderator 1 Tour
Member Elite
since 07-31-2000
Posts 3496
Statesboro, GA, USA


1 posted 08-04-2008 11:05 PM       View Profile for Stephanos   Email Stephanos   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit Stephanos's Home Page   View IP for Stephanos

I still think its about doing the right thing, and figuring out that that is what really yields the most satisfaction.  

Though we are in a society where many (most?) are following "their own thing" rather than finding out what is right, I don't think satisfaction or "happiness" is greater as a result.

Stephen  
serenity blaze
Member Empyrean
since 02-02-2000
Posts 28839


2 posted 08-04-2008 11:56 PM       View Profile for serenity blaze   Email serenity blaze   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for serenity blaze

Oh John...

Again, you roll the coin, and aptly show both sides, and you have the answer in all the 3-D, and ask us to choose either/or....

tsk...

How can anyone follow a "bliss" that is not morally inclined to balance to the favor of their own perspective?

(smile...this reminds me of those old push/slide carnie coin games...)

oceanvu2
Senior Member
since 02-24-2007
Posts 1007
Santa Monica, California, USA


3 posted 08-07-2008 08:29 PM       View Profile for oceanvu2   Email oceanvu2   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for oceanvu2

Ah John, RE: Yet, even when that following is without conscious deliberate harm
to anyone else, can it still be morally wrong?

Does anyone remember what it was like
in that miserable before time when the imperative
was not following your bliss but doing
the “right thing”

You make too much of it.  If following one's bliss includes doing the "right thing," there is no moral conflict that I can see.

It is, IMO, actually possible to be a decent human being being and at one with one's self and others.

If a particular Bliss-trip involves conscious acts of violence and other heinous behavior, the blissed out psycopath hasn't a clue of what Campbell or many others are talking about anyway. They're not mentally sound.  Can't fix it, can't sweat it.

Follow your bliss.

Jimbeaux

MOCindy
Member
since 07-30-2008
Posts 74


4 posted 08-07-2008 11:51 PM       View Profile for MOCindy   Email MOCindy   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for MOCindy

Bliss or passion is personal feelings. And it is original and authentic in human. It can not be judged. But the way to achieve it can be judged and is under the observation of all kind of laws, rules, cultures and everything.
C thought
Bob K
Member Elite
since 11-03-2007
Posts 3860


5 posted 08-12-2008 09:34 PM       View Profile for Bob K   Email Bob K   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Bob K



     Once again another interesting question, Huan Yi, this time one that follows a "Should we do this or should we do that?" format.

     Questions of this sort enter the discussion by attempting to tell the participants what sorts of rational inquiry will be off bounds.  This is permissible, I suppose, in a legal discussion, where lives and property and freedom may be at stake, and where there are places for these side discussions to be held, and decisions made as to what the rules will be for this particular situation in order to preserve fairness all about.

     In other words, Serenity has a right to Kvetch.  You're stacking the deck from the beginning.

     Most people on a minute to minute basis don't have a clue as to what they actually are doing simply because they're unfocused and aren't paying attention.  What other people think they should be doing may be somewhat more clear, but often they have no ability to distinguish between what other people think they should do and their own thoughts on the matter (should they in fact differ).  What they want and what their bliss may be are questions as off the chart for them as it was for their great great grandmothers.

     Theodore Roethke may have been right when he came up with the good line in a not so good poem—

"The right thing happens to the happy man."

     I'm afraid that for most of us, the prospect of paying enough attention to our own ongoing and unfolding experience is too terrifying over the long term actually to find out, even or perhaps especially when that experience is blissful.  Pragmatically we may simply be more cheerful as the compliant servants of our fears, complaisant in our beliefs that we know what the right thing may be.

     Once again, Roethke:

"In heaven, too, you'd be institutionalized."

     Or something of that sort.

Sincerely, Bob K.
oceanvu2
Senior Member
since 02-24-2007
Posts 1007
Santa Monica, California, USA


6 posted 08-14-2008 02:25 AM       View Profile for oceanvu2   Email oceanvu2   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for oceanvu2

Bob:  RE "Most people on a minute to minute basis don't have a clue as to what they actually are doing simply because they're unfocused and aren't paying attention."

Ain't that ever the truth!  "Pay Attention," or "Be Here Now" are such profound concepts that you can spend a lifetime trying to understand them, or an instant just getting it.  Chop wood. Carry water.

There are so many things we can do with our eyes shut.  How much more beautiful with eyes open.

Best, Jim   
Essorant
Member Elite
since 08-10-2002
Posts 4689
Regina, Saskatchewan; Canada


7 posted 08-14-2008 03:35 AM       View Profile for Essorant   Email Essorant   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit Essorant's Home Page   View IP for Essorant

True bliss true Wisdom sows indeed,
He cultivates and learns to lead,
But Fools will follow any bliss
Like dungbeetles a dunghoard kiss.

oceanvu2
Senior Member
since 02-24-2007
Posts 1007
Santa Monica, California, USA


8 posted 08-19-2008 11:54 PM       View Profile for oceanvu2   Email oceanvu2   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for oceanvu2

Aw, Ess, a fool can't follow his/her bliss, being unable to grasp the concept at all due to foolishness.

Campbell's concept of bliss has nothing to do with willy-nilly impulse, or slavish dedidication to pushing one's crap into a ball.

The misconception links "bliss" with temporary infatuation, or a blind devotion to something which might be absurd.

Campbell's "bliss" is a fairly simple concept.  "Do what works," is a possible summation.  And like all fairly simple concepts, it's a bugger when one doesn't have a handle on it, and inescapable whether one has a handle on it or not.

Campbell's point, I think, is that if one shuts down the brain-yap that prevents one from being whom one is, "bliss," an experiential "being-ness" is an inevitability.  It doesn't necessarily make one "happy," a misreading of "bliss," but it gives one the opportunity of living life withn the context of one's own authenticity. It has nothing (and maybe everything)to do with getting on with things.

Enough already from me.  Best, Jimbeaux
 
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