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Where is the outrage?

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Denise
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0 posted 02-12-2005 11:23 AM       View Profile for Denise   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Denise

What rights do we really have in this country when even the most basic, the right to life, is not honored and protected and fought for? First it was the unborn, now it is the 'inconvenient' sick in our society. If this woman is allowed to be killed by judicial decree, then every other liberty that we fight for is in vain. We might as well just give up and give in to the enemies without and within. Because our liberty will just be a farce.

This is the slippery slope that was created by Roe vs. Wade.

When will we wake up?


quote:
Ironically, while media focus on evacuations aimed at saving lives, the Florida Supreme Court ruled 7-0 last week, that a helpless young Florida woman should die. Her name is Terri Schindler-Schiavo.

I take that back. Not just die. Be killed.

That is what's involved when a person is denied food and water. That person will die a prolonged, painful and horrible death. According to the black-robed justices of the Florida high court, that's exactly what should happen to Terri.

It will be done for a sole and not-so-subtle reason: to cause her to die.

Memo to the court: If this murder isn't prevented, Terri's blood will be on your hands.


http://www.worldnetdaily.com/news/article.asp?ARTICLE_ID=40641


quote:
The Schindlers are heartened by Scantlin's recovery and are expected to appeal.

"In light of the miraculous awakening of Miss Sarah Scantlin in Kansas and the success of the new brainwave test reported in the New York Times this week, my daughter deserves to have this test before she is starved to death by judicial decree," Bob Schindler said.

Dobson agrees.

"Mental disabilities do not damage a person's worth the preciousness of life is not defined by one's abilities. Those who suffer a disabling injury are entitled to the same right to life as we all are. Those seeking to take away Mrs. Schiavo's right to life should have second thoughts after hearing Sarah Scantlin's story." .


http://www.worldnetdaily.com/news/article.asp?ARTICLE_ID=42827
LoveBug
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1 posted 02-12-2005 12:31 PM       View Profile for LoveBug   Email LoveBug   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for LoveBug

Are we going to go back to putting the elderly out to sea?

Seriously, this burns me up.. my cousin was born without being able to walk, and he has limited use of his hands. He is, however, a wonderful singer, drummer, and the pastor of a church. He leads people and touches so many, but the doctors said he wouldn't live to be 5 years old. He is married and has two healthy sons as well.

Even if people don't believe in God, they can't look at these things and think that science is an absolute answer. There is something we don't understand about these cases... every life has a purpose, and it is NOT our right to decide that a life has lost its worth.

Oh, make me Thine forever
And should I fainting be
Lord, let me never ever
Outlive my love for Thee

Brad
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2 posted 02-12-2005 03:02 PM       View Profile for Brad   Email Brad   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Brad

I don't know the facts of this case yet, but the question remains. If a right cannot be exercised, whose responsibility is it to assist in exercising that right?

How far are you willing to take this?

Don't get me wrong, I agree with you guys. A person should be kept alive. The question in the back of my head is always, how much money are you willing to spend for your beliefs?
Denise
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3 posted 02-12-2005 05:05 PM       View Profile for Denise   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Denise

Brad, in this particular case a jury awarded something in excess of a million dollars for her rehabilitation and lifelong care.

Shortly afterwards her husband ceased her rehabilitive therapy, forbade even minimal health care, such as dental care and cleaning and the administration of antibiotics, etc., and transferred her to a custodial nursing home, owned by a powerful figure in the euthenasia movement, who is a relative of the lawyer that the husband hired, and a friend of the judge, or vice-versa, I don't remember whom is exactly connected to whom and how, but there is a connection between all three. The courts have never even allowed a court appointed attorney to look out for her interests in any of the hearings.

Most of the money that had been awarded for her care has been spent on attorney's fees in the husband's legal fight to have her starved to death, and her parents are on the verge of bankruptcy due to their court battles to prevent his goal of killing their daughter.

She's not on machines to keep her alive. This is not a case of a machine breathing for someone or a machine pumping someone's heart. She has a simple feeding tube.

The husband remains the legal guardian despite the fact that he has a conflict of interest, aside from the money, in that he long ago became involved with another woman and has had two children by her. They are living together as if they were husband and wife, and despite the mounting evidence that suggests the husband was possibly responsible for Terry's loss of consciousness in the first place (evidence of spousal abuse, x-rays of broken bones, evidence of injuries not consistent with someone simply passing out and being derprived of oxygen) that the courts won't look into and that the police won't investigate, I guess due to the passage of time).

How much would I be willing to spend? Every last penny available to me, just as I am sure that you would if this were your daughter. For what is money compared to human life and the protection of our right to it?

Capricious
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4 posted 02-12-2005 07:53 PM       View Profile for Capricious   Email Capricious   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Capricious

Looks to me like the money to maintain this woman has already been provided by a previous legal settlement. I am curious why the girl's parents have not filed for divorce on her behalf citing adultery on the part of the husband.  

Conflict of interest indeed.  I presume that the remainder of the monies awarded for his wife's care will default to the husband in the event of her death.

Has the family exhausted all appeals?  This is a death sentence, as surely as if she were on death row, especially in the absence of a living will.

Denise, I will have to respectfully disagree with you regarding your blaming this case on Roe v Wade.  The circumstance of a mother with child is a unique one, where the burden of childbirth cannot be shifted to another.  In this case, the woman could be remitted to the care of her parents, or even a state ward.  She is not inseparably connected to her husband, neither is she physically dependent upon him specifically for her survival (anyone may administer her feedings).

No one's rights but hers are being violated here, although I am certain her husband feels some "right" to her money that he is so doggedly determined to starve her to death to acquire.

If it were my decision, I'd have the husband arrested for attempted murder.  That a panel of judges have chosen to assist him in this undertaking is absolutely outrageous.  
Denise
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5 posted 02-12-2005 10:29 PM       View Profile for Denise   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Denise

Capricious,

The parents have filed to become her guardian, and if that weren't acceptable to the court, they had told the court to then make her a ward of the state. The court has smacked down their every request, even the request that she have an attorney to represent her interests in the multitudinous hearings, and the request to review the spousal abuse evidence.

The court has also denied their filings regarding the husband's suitability to continue being her guardian due to his evident conflict of interest. It seems to me that the fix is in on this with the judge, the euthenasia advocate, the husband and his attorney (who is also a euthenasia advocate).

They have also appealed to the husband to divorce their daughter, grant them guardianship, even with the stipulation that he can even keep the rest of the money. They don't want the money, they want their daughter. He turned them down. It seems he will not be satisfied with anything less than her death.

They can't file for divorce on her behalf I guess because the husband is the guardian in the eyes of the law, the one who calls all the shots and makes all the decisions, not them. The parents have no legal standing to speak for her or to do anything on her behalf in the eyes of the law, to my understanding. Maybe that is different from state to state, I don't know.

Of course there are differences between this and abortion, but there is a similarity...the devaluing of human life in the eyes of society. That is the slippery slope. It started with abortion. Now in one country (can't remember which one) doctors  have the right to kill babies and children, ones already born, if they are sick or disabled and don't meet some 'standard of life' quality. And in this country I've heard that euthenasia is practiced on the sick elderly more than most might realize. Keep slowly upping the morphine dose until they stop breathing (morphine depresses the repiratory function).

I guess that is sort of like putting them out to sea, LoveBug, just a little less obvious, even viewed as compassionate if they happen to be in a lot of pain from something. Of course, I don't think you'd have many doctors publicly admitting to this practice due to fear of prosecution in some places. Seems like they wouldn't have a problem with these Florida judges, though.
Ron
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6 posted 02-12-2005 11:37 PM       View Profile for Ron   Email Ron   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit Ron's Home Page   View IP for Ron

quote:
Of course there are differences between this and abortion, but there is a similarity...the devaluing of human life in the eyes of society. That is the slippery slope. It started with abortion.

LOL. That particular slippery slope, the devaluing of human life, started somewhere back around Abel and Cain, Denise.
LoveBug
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7 posted 02-13-2005 09:33 AM       View Profile for LoveBug   Email LoveBug   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for LoveBug

I have a cold and a headache. Should I blow my brains out?

Every life is full of pain, and some much more than others. However, who decides how much is too much? Who has that right? Who says that I DON'T have the right to blow my brains out over a cold... common sense tells you that I shouldn't, right?

What about a living woman? She is unable to speak or interact. So are many autistic children. Do they deserve to die? She can't walk or stand on her own. Neither can my cousin, the pastor of a church and father of two. Does he deserve to die? Are their lives worth any less than ours?

Oh, make me Thine forever
And should I fainting be
Lord, let me never ever
Outlive my love for Thee

Denise
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8 posted 02-13-2005 01:05 PM       View Profile for Denise   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Denise

quote:
That particular slippery slope, the devaluing of human life, started somewhere back around Abel and Cain



One of the differences I see though, Ron, aside from it being the first murder of passion (committed in the throes of anger produced by jealousy), is that Cain's act was not enshrined as an acceptable practice in the ridding oneself of an incovenience. It was murder and was viewed and recorded as murder, and as an unacceptable behavior.

The slippery slope comes into play when something previously not condoned by society, and the laws of a society, becomes acceptable, and then from that, even more things that were previously unacceptable become acceptable. It's a snowball effect.

From the decree of judges that States could not pass laws against abortion, we started with abortions being acceptable in the first trimester only back in the 70's, and then 25 years later we had degenerated to the point of partial birth abortions, that are performed at or around the expected time of delivery...doctors just have to reach in to turn the baby around to ensure that the head is inside the womb when they kill it with their instruments, then it isn't considered murder, otherwise it is. Same baby, same healthy condition, same viability, just a different positioning of the baby's head makes the difference between an accepted surgical procedure and murder.

And now one country (Denmark, I think) has legalized the killing of infants and children who are in one way or another disabled, physically or mentally. And now we in this country are at the point where judges are decreeing that a woman can be legally starved to death because she is brain damaged and on no life-supporting machines whatsover other than a feeding tube.

In my opinion, this is what happens when a society forsakes the revealed standards of God (that God says in the Bible that He reveals to every person, innately, we don't have to be taught them), and prefer instead to turn away from that knowledge that God has implanted within and become our own gods, to do what seems expedient in our own eyes (relativistic morality).

quote:
What about a living woman? She is unable to speak or interact. So are many autistic children. Do they deserve to die? She can't walk or stand on her own. Neither can my cousin, the pastor of a church and father of two. Does he deserve to die? Are their lives worth any less than ours?


Sadly, some people seem to think so, LoveBug.

But this particular woman does interact. Her eyes follow people and moving objects. She reacts to sounds, she can sit in a chair. She attempts to communicate by making gutteral sounds. She smiles, laughs and cries. She isn't the 'vegetable' that some try to make her out to be. She is brain-damaged, yes, and operates at a different level of consciousness, and several doctors have testified on her behalf that there is every reason to expect her to improve, with the therapy that the jury awarded money was intended to provide for her. But the courts keep ruling in favor of the husband's position, and the doctor's hired by his lawyer that depict her as a hopeless vegetable, despite the obvious evidence to the contrary.
Marge Tindal
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9 posted 02-13-2005 03:21 PM       View Profile for Marge Tindal   Email Marge Tindal   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit Marge Tindal's Home Page   View IP for Marge Tindal

Denise~
You already know how this case breaks my heart~

While there are MANY of us who have expressed outrage at what is happening to Terri ... it seems that all pleas for Terri's care and well-being, and the right to CONTINUE to live, have fallen on a court of deaf ears !

It just tears us up to see that the judicial system would deny Terri's parents the right to care for their daughter for all her future needs~

Doesn't make sense ... not even to attorney's and judges I've discussed this with~

Many of us are still working, trying to use our voices to get the right ear to HEAR our outrage ...~

This morning the pastor of my church led us in prayerful reminder that Terri is very much in need of all the prayers we can muster~

Miracle ?  That looks like what it's going to take to spare her life~
LoveBug
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10 posted 02-13-2005 05:09 PM       View Profile for LoveBug   Email LoveBug   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for LoveBug

"Cain's act was not enshrined as an acceptable practice in the ridding oneself of an incovenience."

Exactly, and I also agree with your comparison to abortion. It shows the trend in this nation, and it's frightening.

Oh, make me Thine forever
And should I fainting be
Lord, let me never ever
Outlive my love for Thee
Denise
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11 posted 02-14-2005 08:41 PM       View Profile for Denise   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Denise

It does seem that a miracle is what is needed in the face of this utter disregard and disdain for the sanctity of human life by these judges and attorneys who would sacrifice a human live on their agenda altar.

Yes, it is frightening and very sad. And none of us are safe from similar situations if they set a precedent with this case.

hush
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12 posted 02-14-2005 11:49 PM       View Profile for hush   Email hush   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for hush

I don't see this so much as a sanctity of human life issue as a simple issue of rights.

If she did not have any advance directives written (IE, a DNR (do not resucisstate) order) she has a full right to all life saving procedures. Now, in reading the timeline on the official family website, it said that her husband did get her DNR status- however, I'm not sure, legally that being a DNR would in any way require/allow taking away procedures you've already had done, like her feeding tube. There is a DNR comfort care- nothing is done to treat a terminally ill patient, including feeding tubes, antibiotics, etc.

But if there is no clear indication that Terri did not want to live this way, it would, legally and humanistically, make sense to err on the side of life.

Now, on the issue of eauthanasia... I work in a nursing home. I watched my grandmother die, and I recently saw my mother struggle through a long period of disability that ended in death. I fully support the right of the individual to choose a painless and dignified death over a prolonged one. Key word- that individual, not their family or spouse. You know what else? I see cancer all the time... and I don't believe for one second that it is cruel to provide palliative pain relief based more on effectiveness than safe dosage range in the end stages of cancer or other progressive and terminal conditions. I think if the individual had agreed to it beforehand (as most will have had time to think about before becoming that severely ill) it is a humane and decent thing to do. I'd rather go painlessly in my sleep than with a drowning sensation because there is a tumor the size of a football in my lungs.

I think that the euthanasia camp can go too far- but then, so can the right-to-life (any life, at all costs) camp.
Denise
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13 posted 02-18-2005 07:44 PM       View Profile for Denise   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Denise

And that's the rub here, hush, where the line has been crossed by her husband with the DNR comfort care order. She is not terminally ill. She is disabled. And the reason the jury award was for such a huge amount was because experts testified that she would have to be cared for, to some extent, even with rehabilitative therapy, for the rest of her life and that her life expectancy was projected to be similar to that of a non-disabled person.

It is a dangerous precedent that these judges are trying to establish with this case, making it legal to withhold nourishment from a disabled person, starving them, somone who doesn't meet some 'quality of life' test, but with an otherwise normal life expectancy.

It appears that they may be successful. Very frightening, but more than that, very, very sad.

Brad
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14 posted 02-18-2005 08:23 PM       View Profile for Brad   Email Brad   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Brad

To be honest, this case baffles me. She's been in a coma for 13 years, there are some reports that she is on life support (it was a blog so perhaps inaccurate).

Nevertheless, there's no reason to believe she's there.

Yet, given the outpouring of support for this case at least on the internet, I don't understand why the guardianship and responsibility simply aren't given to someone else?

From a secular point of view, if she's not there it doesn't hurt anyone to keep the body going (as long as you're willing to pay for it.)

Denise
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15 posted 02-19-2005 01:57 PM       View Profile for Denise   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Denise

Actually much of the mainstream media that have even featured the story have also said that she is on life support, which of course, to most people means machines breathing for her and keeping her heart beating, and not merely a feeding tube. I guess food can be considered life support, since without it we die.

This is a misconception that the husband's attorney keeps alive and well. Ignorance fosters his agenda. It's much more palatable to compassionately "pull the plug" to put someone out of their misery, than it is to admit that what you are actually attemtping to do is starve someone to death, creating misery and a slow painful death.

He was on Greta VanSusteran the other night calling on all those who love the Constitution to stand by Terri's "right to die" and to stand against those who oppose her right to die who will be holding prayer vigils and demonstrations, characterizing them as extremists (and by implication haters of the Constitution?) What these "extremists" oppose is her being allowed to be starved to death by her husband, with the sanction of the court. And I don't find a "right to die" in the Constitution anyway, but some lawyers and judges seem to find anything they want to find in the Constitution.

But I do think that she is 'there' to some extent. She is operating at some level of consciousness. Science just doesn't have all the answers.

In my opinion, guardianship hasn't been turned over to someone else because the husband and the courts want her dead. I think the courts want to set a precedent for euthenasia in cases such as this, and as for the husband...I don't know, maybe he doesn't want to take the chance that she might "come out of it" some day and start speaking?
Juju
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16 posted 02-19-2005 03:32 PM       View Profile for Juju   Email Juju   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit Juju's Home Page   View IP for Juju

If they honor this, than suicide is technically legal.

Convinience is a common theme to such taboo.

Juju

Juju - 1.) a magic charm or fetish 2.)Magic 3.)A taboo connected woth the use of magic

The dictionary never lies.... I am magical (;

hush
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17 posted 02-19-2005 03:54 PM       View Profile for hush   Email hush   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for hush

'Nevertheless, there's no reason to believe she's there.'

If I'm not mistaken, she can respond (in a limited degree) to her mothers commands, such as to blink, or smile. I've seen videos featuring her, both on TV and in school, and there is every reason to believe she's "there." Even someone who stares at a ceiling all day without the ability to move or speak could still be thinking somewhere inside. I care for the elderly and disabled, and I have known people who can do no more than shift their gaze to look at me about once a week, and people who can't even do that. Sure, we can't prove that they're "there," but we can't prove that they aren't except in the case of persistent vegitative states. I mean, is someone with demetia who keeps repeating "The cats are here! The cats are here!" really "there?" Should we kill them, too?

Sorry, that makes me sound a little more extreme/determined on this issue than I really am. The point isn't whether you are there or not- the point is whether you wanted to be kept alive or not, and whether, should your heart stop, you would or would not want to be recussitated. A feeding tube, for the most part, is a standard form of life support for someone who will be disabled long-term. Unless she specifically stated beforehand (and in this case, to someone other than her husband who is suspected of putting her in this condition) that she would not want to be alive in these conditions, it is immoral not to. And while a DNR-CC code status will allow for prevention of the placement of a feeding tube, I don't really see how it can be legal (or in any way humane) to take it out and, yes, as Denise says, allow someone to starve to death. Assuming that the ill, elderly, and comatose cannot feel pain is, in my opinion, just as bad as assuming that being black means someone is property. Which, incidentally, is why I support DNR orders, as well as euthanasia... when the DNR is chosen either by the patient or a caring family member who clearly has no ulterior motives, or when the euthanasia is chosen by the patient.

If he really wants Terri dead in a humane way, he should try tfor a lethal injection. Still immoral, but far less miserable a death, IMO.
hush
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18 posted 02-19-2005 03:58 PM       View Profile for hush   Email hush   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for hush

Oh, to get back to Denise-

Someone who suffers a stroke is not terminally ill. But if all I could do was lay in bed all day with contracted arms, unable to speak or write to express myself, and unable to eat... I would hope my family would be kind and unselfish enough to recognize that when it's time for me to go... it's time for me to go, not to be CPR'ed back for more suffering.
Denise
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19 posted 02-21-2005 12:11 PM       View Profile for Denise   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Denise

Those are decisions, hush, that are personal preference and conscience issues that can vary greatly from one person to the next and should only be acted upon by written direction of the patient, through means of a "Living Will" or "Will to Live" document. Absent that, the family and the medical and legal system should always act to protect the life of the patient.

Some excerpts from an article:

quote:
Terri Schiavo is alive, brain damaged from a mysterious injury 15 years ago in her apartment with her husband present. She cannot swallow. Her husband, Michael, has refused her therapy that might wean her from the feeding tube.

Therapy that might mean Terri could talk again. Perhaps she could tell what happened that night she mysteriously fell ill. Perhaps she could explain the full body x-rays that show a variety of broken and healed bones in her body from injuries no one knows about.

Perhaps that might explain why legal moves kept the x-rays hidden for years. Perhaps it might also explain why the one judge, George Greer, who has consistently ruled against Terri all these years, refused to allow the x-rays introduced as evidence in any of the many hearings on the case.

Perhaps. I'm just asking.

But time is short. Terri may begin "processing" tomorrow, unless there's a legal miracle or any other kind to stop what her father calls "judicial murder."

Who gets "processed"? Maybe the person is old, not necessarily sick, just old too old. Perhaps young, too young to be worth spending time, effort and expense to bring to health. Perhaps sick, requiring "too much" money or time or bed space to heal. Perhaps handicapped, so the person can't live a "normal" life whatever that means.
Michael Schiavo wants Terri's feeding tube removed. That will kill her. She will die a prolonged, painful death from starvation and dehydration. He says she'd want that, but he has no written proof. He just says it, and has spent hundreds of thousands of dollars in the legal system to get his wife dead.


If the legal system kills Terri Schiavo, none of us is safe. The system is big and powerful and, if it wants you dead, you will be.

Read it and weep.

http://www.worldnetdaily.com/news/article.asp?ARTICLE_ID=42957
Denise
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20 posted 02-21-2005 09:04 PM       View Profile for Denise   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Denise

I am sitting here crying reading the latest round of court filings and denied appeals.

I just don't understand how these courts and judges can get away with this. Are judges above the laws that they are supposed to be interpreting?  How can they blatantly ignore the statutes that are already on the books in Florida for the protection of the incapacitated like Terri? Why in her case are they simply ignoring those laws that are supposed to guarantee those protections?

Why can't somebody do something to hold them accountable to those statutes and prevent them from doing this? What law are they interpreting that allows them to decree that an innocent person can be starved to death? They wouldn't allow this to happen to a convicted criminal on death row. Why is she not entitled to the same due process as a criminal?

Her husband has stated his intention to issue the order to stop feeding and hydrating Terri at 1 pm tomorrow.

Why can't somebody do something? I don't understand it. I just don't understand it.

  
Denise
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21 posted 02-23-2005 09:09 PM       View Profile for Denise   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Denise

The latest news is that a Stay has been issued today until Friday while Judge Greer considers whether he will allow medical tests to try to determine Terri's brain activity level, since new testing breakthroughs have recently been developed.
http://www.worldnetdaily.com/news/article.asp?ARTICLE_ID=43006

Another commentary on this heartbreaking situation:
http://www.worldnetdaily.com/news/article.asp?ARTICLE_ID=42991

Contact information if you wish to let your voice be heard on Terri's behalf:

Governor Jeb Bush
Office of The Governor Florida Capitol Building, PL-05
Tallahassee, FL 32399-0001
(850) 488-7146
(850) 488-4441
jeb.bush@myflorida.com

Attorney General
Charlie Crist
Office of Attorney General
State of Florida
The Capitol
Tallahassee, FL 32399-1050
(850) 414-3990
Fax: (850) 487-2564
ag@oag.state.fl.us

State Attorney
Bernie McCabe
14250 49th Street
North Clearwater, FL 33762
(727) 464-6221

LOCAL MEDIA
Mr. Bill Levesque, The St. Pete Times -- levesque@sptimes.com
The St. Pete Times -- letters@sptimes.com
The Tampa Tribune -- tribletters@tampatrib.com
970 WLFA AM Radio -- news@970wfla.com

Mailing Addresses:
Tampa Tribune
Letters to the Editor
P.O. Box 191
Tampa, FL 33601-4405
          
St. Pete Times
Letters to the Editor
P.O. Box 1121
St. Pete, FL 33731

Please pray for Terri's protection and for strength for her family during this emotionally trying time, and also for a change of heart for her husband.

Thank you.


Denise
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since 08-22-99
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22 posted 02-23-2005 09:57 PM       View Profile for Denise   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Denise

And here is another commentary:
http://www.townhall.com/columnists/terencejeffrey/tj20050223.shtml

Huan Yi
Member Ascendant
since 10-12-2004
Posts 6334
Waukegan


23 posted 02-24-2005 12:34 AM       View Profile for Huan Yi   Email Huan Yi   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Huan Yi


Again, I can not reconcile a professed faith
in a worthwhile afterlife and the fierce opposition to letting someone
in such a condition as is Terri Schiavo, (who I assume as no great
burden of sins to carry), die. . .   It seems to me to betray a disbelief
at the core.
hush
Senior Member
since 05-27-2001
Posts 1693
Ohio, USA


24 posted 02-24-2005 08:38 AM       View Profile for hush   Email hush   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for hush

"If the legal system kills Terri Schiavo, none of us is safe. The system is big and powerful and, if it wants you dead, you will be.

Read it and weep."

Well, if they do go through with this, I think it's a terribly unfair decisiion, but the idea that courts are going to somehow look through medical records and start killing any of us that are inconvenient is just silly. It's not like the courts themselves went looking this- it was brought to them. So maybe the moral here should be to worry about what your next of kin might say or want- and never leave it to chance- get your living will.
 
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