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Passions in Poetry

Where is the outrage?

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Denise
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150 posted 03-28-2005 10:25 PM       View Profile for Denise   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Denise

I just heard that an autopsy must be done in Florida for everyone being cremated, according to Flordia statute. And Felos gave an interview this afternoon saying that Michael 'asked' for an autopsy. Kind of unnecessary if it is mandated, I would think.

This should be interesting. Maybe this will be one statute that doesn't get violated in this long sad story. Or maybe not. And if a court order can take away an innocent person's life via starvation and dehydration, violating an autopsy requirement should be no big feat for Greer to accomplish. That might not be too hard at all if the medical examiner is also "one of the boys".
LoveBug
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151 posted 03-28-2005 10:47 PM       View Profile for LoveBug   Email LoveBug   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for LoveBug

I find it interesting that Brad chose not to address Denise's point about the cerebral cortex... hmm.

Good stuff, Denise. Thanks for all of your insight and information. I heard about the autopsy today. I'd really like if it showed she could have been rehabilitated, so everyone could see what a monster her 'husband' and his cohorts are. Then again, as you said, I'm sure the doctor performing the procedure will be chosen, and will be 'sympathetic' to the 'cause'.

Love's a lovely lad
His bringing up is beauty
Who loves him not is mad
For I must pay him duty
-Anonymous

Denise
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152 posted 03-28-2005 10:59 PM       View Profile for Denise   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Denise

A simple PET scan and MRI could have shown her true condition.

It's so sad that it has come to this.

jbouder
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153 posted 03-29-2005 08:43 AM       View Profile for jbouder   Email jbouder   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for jbouder

quote:
Not arguing that. Simply pointing out that you can't talk about diginity with someone who can't talk.


Your statement in and of itself is true, but does an individual's dignity end when a person can no longer communicate?  Does an infant child's life only have potential value?  That's absurd.

I think it is a mistake to reduce this argument to one between conflicting religious points of view (unless, of course, you consider any idealogical discussion to be necessarily theistic).  I think the real issue is whether a severely disabled person should be afforded the same Constitutional protections as a nondisabled person.  In most cases, I would expect an answer in the affirmative.  Then, I think, we can ask ourselves the more important question - when does a person become a non-person?

I'm willing to accept, given sufficient evidence, that Terri Schiavo was, in fact, an empty shell.  The courts seemed to focus on whether Ms. Shiavo's verbal "living will" was actionable rather than whether there was sufficient medical grounds to consider her brain dead.  This, I believe, was a mistake.

Jim
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154 posted 03-29-2005 09:50 AM       View Profile for Not A Poet   Email Not A Poet   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit Not A Poet's Home Page   View IP for Not A Poet

quote:
The courts seemed to focus on whether Ms. Shiavo's verbal "living will" was actionable rather than whether there was sufficient medical grounds to consider her brain dead.  This, I believe, was a mistake.

Jim, you always seem to make the good argument. That is exactly what so many have tried to say but it always has come out long and convoluted.

Pete
Denise
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155 posted 03-29-2005 07:31 PM       View Profile for Denise   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Denise

The truth of her medical condition was so a non-issue, that the husband and the judge both refused a PET scan and an MRI, as requested by the parents several times, even though they couldn't legally have ordered the feeding tube removed UNLESS she were PVS. A death decree was ordered anyway.

Now he 'wants' an autopsy to prove that she was PVS, as if an autopsy performed in Penellis County by a Penellis County medical examiner would prove anything at this point. I would insist on an outside M.E. if I were the parents to be assured of a truthful autopsy in light of all the corruption and collusion being uncovered, but that would only be DENIED as well, without comment, by the very predicatable Judge Greer.

If Schiavo wants to prove so badly that's she's PVS, order a PET scan or MRI, WHILE SHE IS STILL ALIVE.

But that's not what he really wants. He wants her dead.

He doesn't want to prove that she IS PVS, he wants to prove that she WAS PVS, and the autopsy will say whatever he and Judge Greer and George Felos want it to say. Or Greer will again violate a Florida Statute and there will be no autopsy.

Will the death certificate say:

Cause of Death: Starvation & Dehydration

or will it say:

Cardiac Arrest secondary to PVS?

[This message has been edited by Denise (03-29-2005 09:20 PM).]

Denise
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156 posted 03-29-2005 07:38 PM       View Profile for Denise   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Denise

Just a taste of the weirdness of George Felos, the death lawyer, who is now being paid by the ACLU and the Hemlock society to continue persuing Terri's death since he drained Terri's trust account dry:

http://www.worldnetdaily.com/news/article.asp?ARTICLE_ID=43535
Denise
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157 posted 03-29-2005 09:11 PM       View Profile for Denise   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Denise

I just heard that there is an emergency meeting in the Florida legislature right now.

Oh God, please, please let them take action before it is too late.
Denise
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158 posted 03-29-2005 10:46 PM       View Profile for Denise   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Denise

Jeb Bush is courting
dereliction of duty

Posted: March 29, 2005
11:44 a.m. Eastern

© 2005 WorldNetDaily.com
The Florida state constitution declares unequivocally that in the state of Florida "the supreme executive power shall be vested in a governor … ." The word supreme means highest in authority. There can be no executive authority in the state of Florida higher than the governor. No state law can create an executive authority higher than highest in the Florida constitution. Therefore no court order based upon such a law can constitutionally create such an authority.

If the governor tells the local police in Pinellas County to step aside, they must do so, or else be arrested and tried for an assault on the government of the state, which is to say insurrection.
(If Gov. Jeb Bush fears that for some reason they would question the authority of his representatives, then he should take the necessary law enforcement officials to Tampa in person, thus making the situation crystal clear.)

Since Florida's highest law grants him supreme executive power, the governor's action would be lawful. No one in the Florida judiciary can say otherwise, since the whole basis for the doctrine of judicial review (which they invoked when they refused to apply "Terri's law") is that any law at variance with the constitution is no law at all.

Gov. Bush has said that he recognizes the injustice being done to Terri Schiavo but is powerless to stop it. He is obviously not powerless, and his view of injustice is fully warranted.

The Florida state constitution declares: "All natural persons, female and male alike, are equal before the law and have inalienable rights, among which are the right to enjoy and defend life and liberty … ."

The word "inalienable" means that the rights in question cannot be given away or transferred to another by law. Now, by allowing Michael Schiavo to starve his wife to death, Judge George W. Greer transfers to Schiavo the exercise of her right to life, doing on her behalf what the Florida state constitution declares she herself could not do (since an inalienable right cannot be given away).

Schiavo's decision, and any element of the law it is based on that has the same effect, are therefore unconstitutional on the face of it

The governor of Florida cannot be obliged to enforce unconstitutional edicts, nor can he be faulted for acting to stop an evident violation of the constitution. In his oath as governor he swore to "support, protect and defend the Constitution and government of the United States and of the state of Florida."

As supreme executive, he is obliged to act in their defense, and no court order can relieve him of this responsibility.

Any order by Judge Greer that seeks to prevent him from doing his sworn duty, as he sees fit, is invalid, and any attempt by the judge to incite armed forces to enforce his order would be an act of judicial insurrection against the constitution and government of Florida.

The judge may have whatever opinion he pleases, but when he attempts to use force to back it up, he breaks the law, going against the constitution of the state, which is to say against the supreme law in Florida.

In Federalist 81, when Alexander Hamilton lists the safeguards against "judiciary encroachments on the legislative authority," he cites in particular "its total incapacity to support its usurpations by force."

Accepting the notion that judicial orders at any level may constitute an executive power superior to the chief executive would give the judiciary just such a forceful capacity.

When every judicial decision carries the implied threat of armed insurrection, a key safeguard of liberty and self-government is removed. If any state governor, or the president of the United States acts so as to encourage the judiciary to assume such executive power, or the people to believe that it may constitutionally do so, he undermines the integrity of all our constitutions, and of American self-government as a whole.

This constitutes a grave dereliction of duty and would in saner times clearly be grounds for his impeachment by a legislature intent on defending the Florida constitution against "judiciary encroachments."

By God's grace, however, Terri Schiavo still lives, and Gov. Bush may yet act to redeem himself and his constitutional authority. Courageous action would be an act of statesmanship, defending the integrity of our constitutional system and the ultimate sovereignty of the people.

We have long been awaiting the statesman who could turn a crisis into such healing. Like Ronald Reagan before him, Jeb Bush could prove himself such a man. For Terri's sake and for the sake of constitutional self-government in America, he should act now. For failure to do so, he has no excuse.


http://www.worldnetdaily.com/news/article.asp?ARTICLE_ID=43536

Local Rebel
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159 posted 03-29-2005 11:24 PM       View Profile for Local Rebel   Email Local Rebel   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Local Rebel

One thing that I've always admired about you Denise is that you approach everything you do with passion.  I have my own concerns about state authority making medical decisions for individuals and there is no gain for anyone for me to discuss the particular merits of Terri's case, but just on a personal note I can understand fully what the Schindlers are doing having lost a child, but, I'm at a loss to understand the motives of Michael.  I've never met him, or Terri.  I'm not there.  I don't know.  

But for my Christian friends who have so much emotion invested in this some words from 2 Samuel come to mind;

quote:

16 David pleaded with God for the child. He fasted and went into his house and spent the nights lying on the ground. 17 The elders of his household stood beside him to get him up from the ground, but he refused, and he would not eat any food with them.
18 On the seventh day the child died. David's servants were afraid to tell him that the child was dead, for they thought, "While the child was still living, we spoke to David but he would not listen to us. How can we tell him the child is dead? He may do something desperate."
19 David noticed that his servants were whispering among themselves and he realized the child was dead. "Is the child dead?" he asked.
"Yes," they replied, "he is dead."
20 Then David got up from the ground. After he had washed, put on lotions and changed his clothes, he went into the house of the LORD and worshiped. Then he went to his own house, and at his request they served him food, and he ate.
21 His servants asked him, "Why are you acting this way? While the child was alive, you fasted and wept, but now that the child is dead, you get up and eat!"
22 He answered, "While the child was still alive, I fasted and wept. I thought, 'Who knows? The LORD may be gracious to me and let the child live.' 23 But now that he is dead, why should I fast? Can I bring him back again? I will go to him, but he will not return to me."

2 Samuel 12:16-23 (New International Version)



Just something that might bring comfort when the time comes.


LoveBug
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160 posted 03-30-2005 08:30 AM       View Profile for LoveBug   Email LoveBug   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for LoveBug

http://www.cnn.com/2005/WORLD/europe/03/30/pope.monday/index.html

The pope is on a feeding tube now too. Good thing he doesn't live in the US, or he'd get to starve too.

Love's a lovely lad
His bringing up is beauty
Who loves him not is mad
For I must pay him duty
-Anonymous

Denise
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161 posted 03-30-2005 08:41 AM       View Profile for Denise   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Denise

Thanks for your kind and comforting words, L.R.

I find strength and comfort in the arms of the Lord in everything and through everything. I don't know how people who don't believe in God or in His ultimate control over everything keep their sanity.

Yes, I believe that no matter how this situation resolves itself, it will be according to His will.

I also believe that some of those who are fighting to keep her alive are doing so out of a belief that every life is a sacred gift of God and that He is the only one with the authority to determine the time to depart this earth, not man, not a human court.

I believe others are fighting for the principle of protecting the right to life guaranteed to be secured in the Constitution, and to avoid the precedent that this will set if the current ORDER is allowed to stand.

I also don't believe that the government should involve itself in private affairs, normally. But this case is far from normal. Many allegations of corruption, collusion, abuse and neglect have been swirling about her sad situation for some time now, even though it has only recently become a national story of interest.

Due to these mitigating circumstances that make this case stand out from normal end-of-life issues is the reason that Congress was asked to step in, by the authority of the 14th Amendment, to ensure that Terri's Constitutional rights had not been violated by the State, the same protections offered to criminals receiving a sentence of death.

Perhaps God allowed this situation to occur to bring vivdly into focus the abuses of power that have been taking place, and how dangerous that can be to our rights if it isn't challenged. Perhaps He has hardened the hearts of the judges for that very purpose. Perhaps He is also working in the hearts of those who are fighting for her rights and life, challenging people to make a stand for justice, mercy and truth, things that God esteems highly.

The ultimate outcome for Terri is in His hands, as it has always been. The issues raised by her situation will be around for quite some time, and may well bring about needed changes in the current laws, that I'm sure most people didn't realize were so deficient, like doctors and health care facilities having the ultimate say in end-of-life issues, no matter the wishes of the patient and family, in Texas, and such as a 'spouse' being able to retain guardianship even after starting a new life with another, and despite 12 years of serious allegations of neglect and abuse, in Florida.

Good comes out of every tragedy, and as the verse you quoted says, Who knows what God will do, what His will is in a situation prior to its resolution. So we fast and pray.

A couple things I do know is that God says, "I set before you life and death; Choose life."  And "Do justice, love mercy and walk humbly with God."

So I'll attempt to do that in the interim prior to the revealing of His will in Terri's case and the outcome will be as He wishes. And the lessons presented by this situation will also have been provided to us, according to His will.

Thanks again for your kind words.
Brad
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162 posted 03-30-2005 08:53 AM       View Profile for Brad   Email Brad   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Brad

Lovebug,

Thought I did, oh well.

Jim,

By two religious viewpoints, I meant death with dignity versus life at all costs.

Does communication thereby dictate one's right to live?

No.

Do those who do communicate or nature determine that?

Yes.

I have not seen the video, I have seen the pictures. I am not convinced of the  tabloid conspiracies I hear about, nor am I convinced that any person should ever be compared to Jesus (WND did that). I do not know the whole situation regarding the husband but it strikes as just a bit too neat to demonize the guy you disagree with.

How did she become what she has been for the last fifteen years?

Who has recovered from that?

(multiple documentation, please!)

It has become a circus and you know it. I'm not being disingenous at all when I say that you're situation is entirely, entirely different.

Love,

Brad
Denise
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163 posted 03-30-2005 09:12 AM       View Profile for Denise   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Denise

Bush's political obituary

Posted: March 30, 2005
1:00 a.m. Eastern

© 2005 WorldNetDaily.com

I never had any desire to run for political office, but, if I did, it would be to make a difference.

If I didn't think I could make a difference, what would be the point?

Florida Gov. Jeb Bush told us last week he just didn't have the power and authority to save one innocent woman forced by court order and armed guard to starve to death in his state.

I don't believe that's true. Not for a minute do I believe it. Jeb Bush blinked. And that weakness that he showed for the whole world should represent the end of his political career.

It's unfortunate, because I believe Jeb Bush knew, deep in his convictions, it was wrong to let Terri Schiavo be murdered by a judge's order

He even dispatched a team of state law enforcement officers to seize her hours after Judge George Greer refused to listen to his pleadings in the courtroom.

But he backed down. When local cops informed the state officers that they would enforce the judge's order, the agents of the Florida Department of Law Enforcement stopped.

That's not leadership. That's capitulation.

Gov. Jeb Bush shouldn't have merely dispatched officers to the scene to negotiate with the local cops, he should have led them. He should have personally persuaded those local officers that he was the highest law enforcement official in the state and he was ordering them to stand down.

He should have been a field general, not an armchair general.

He should have walked up to that hospice with overwhelming force behind him.

He should have done so with the whole world watching.

Jeb Bush has been talked about as a potential presidential candidate. But who is going to seriously consider a commander in chief who backs down at the first sign of resistance?

Bush may have been trying to take the safe route in this crisis, but it represents, in my estimation, the end of his political ambitions.

Jeb Bush was tested, and he was found lacking.

He allowed a terribly immoral action to take place in his state and did nothing but huff and puff about it.

And it wasn't the first time.

Say what you will about former U.S. Attorney General Janet Reno. I think she was a fascist. I think she was a criminal. I think she was possibly stark, raving mad. But she backed up her misguided convictions by sending armed federal agents swooping in to pick up little Elian Gonzalez and take him back to Cuba.

It was wrong, but she wasn't afraid.

Back then, Gov. Jeb Bush sat by and watched his authority breached by Washington.

This time, he sat by and watched his authority breached by a puny, little county bureaucrat, a local politician, Judge George Greer.

Does the Florida governor have any authority?

If not, we shouldn't take the position seriously as a stepping stone to higher office. If it does, why didn't he use it when it counted?

I feel sorry for Jeb Bush today.

I think he knew right from wrong in this case but didn't have the courage of his convictions. I think he listened to all the wrong advisers. I think he will carry regrets about Terri Schiavo to his grave.

He could have been a hero. He could have been a leader.

Instead, he appears weak. Instead, he appears to vacillate.

My wife told me: "If Jeb Bush had done the right thing for Terri, I would have given up six months of my life to campaign for him. I would have done anything to help him."

I'm sure many people feel like that. Let me ask you today: Is anyone excited about the possibility of a third Bush administration?

  http://www.worldnetdaily.com/news/article.asp?ARTICLE_ID=43542


Speaking of the lessons we learn...

I think both the President and Governor have been found lacking in this sad saga.

Perhaps both should be impeached for dereliction of duty.
Sunshine
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164 posted 03-30-2005 09:45 AM       View Profile for Sunshine   Email Sunshine   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit Sunshine's Home Page   View IP for Sunshine

quote:
Perhaps God allowed this situation to occur to bring vivdly into focus the abuses of power that have been taking place, and how dangerous that can be to our rights if it isn't challenged. Perhaps He has hardened the hearts of the judges for that very purpose. Perhaps He is also working in the hearts of those who are fighting for her rights and life, challenging people to make a stand for justice, mercy and truth, things that God esteems highly.

Stands to religious reason that He very well could be doing all of this, for reasons we may never know.

As I observe through the media not only Terri's plight, but the Pope's health as well, it has crossed my mind that they will meet, and he will greet Terri, explaining how she was used for His purpose.

Brings to mind the story of Bernadette...

You've made a lot of valid points, Denise, and you wear your passion well. I would only hope that you and I see the truths come out, before, AND after.

Because we both realize that there are far deeper events going on than what even the media has uncovered. But nothing remains hidden for long.
jbouder
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165 posted 03-30-2005 01:50 PM       View Profile for jbouder   Email jbouder   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for jbouder

Brad:

quote:
It has become a circus and you know it. I'm not being disingenuous at all when I say that you're situation is entirely, entirely different.


Even Cicero appealed to pathos and ethos from time to time (and I’m not comparing my own skills to those of Cicero, by the way).  

But my position isn’t entirely based on personal experience, nor do I believe it is irrelevant to the discussion.  Because of the database clutter on the Terri Schiavo issue, I couldn’t locate the research I was after on the efficacy of treatments for her type of brain injury.  I did, however, find some information that seems to confirm that people with traumatic brain injury can benefit from similar therapeutic interventions to those that have afforded people with autism significant and meaningful outcomes for more than 40 years:

http://www.nlm.nih.gov/archive/20040830/pubs/cbm/tbi.html#15

I know several families with children who have recovered significantly from severe traumatic brain injuries.  Whether or not the types of brain injury brought on by head trauma are comparable to brain injury resulting from lack of oxygen, I’m not sure.  But if there is some cognition, some ability beyond reflex to respond to external stimuli, then many lost abilities can be reacquired and many of those that are perhaps forever lost can be functionally replaced with assistive technology.  What we don’t know is whether Terri does have some remaining cognitive ability – if she does, she can learn.  Of that, I’m certain.  We also don't know whether such interventions have been attempted with Terri and failed, and if they've failed, whether it was a result of poor delivery of such therapies (I've seen the latter in the case of my son and in many other children who were deemed by some professionals as "unresponsive" to behavioral interventions).

Regardless of the husband’s motives, I’m concerned that the court put undue weight in Terri’s alleged verbal living will, considering the words were apparently uttered at the funeral of a loved one.  Saying you do not wish to be resuscitated is one thing – committing such wishes to paper is an entirely different matter.

I’m not saying that the majority of those contributing to this thread are right.  I am saying that we need more information before we can make an informed decision on the issues at play, and that because of the finality of death, some forbearance is due Terri until what we don’t know is brought to light.

A prediction – the Feds will propose legislation following Terri’s death preventing the repetition of this sad story.  Our form of government is always reactionary.  I see no reason why they won’t behave in the same way they have time after time.

Jim
Denise
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166 posted 03-30-2005 03:14 PM       View Profile for Denise   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Denise

Nothing done in the dark remains hidden forever, Karilea, that's true.

Jim, as a point of information, Terri has had no therapy since 1992.

As soon as the husband received the malpractice jury award in early 1993 (for which the doctor involved in that case has since been found innocent of those malpractice charges that were lodged) of upwards of 1 million dollars, Michael Schiavo immediately did a 180 and put Terri on a DNR status and refused to resume the therapy that she had been receiving prior to that (from which she was benefiting from according to the family and the therapuetic records), and forbade the nursing home staff from administering anti-biotics for infections (to which the nursing home staff overrode his wishes stating that they were obligated to treat her for infections). This is what caused the rift between him and Terri's family. They begged him to provide for her the care and therapy for which he received the jury award to make Terri as well as she could possibly be. When he refused, they sought in court to gain the guardianship so that they could provide it for her.
jbouder
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167 posted 03-30-2005 03:44 PM       View Profile for jbouder   Email jbouder   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for jbouder

Denise:

I'd like to hear the other side's take on this.  Like it or not, there are two sides - both deserve an opportunity to be heard.

Jim
Denise
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168 posted 03-30-2005 03:57 PM       View Profile for Denise   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Denise

You're right, Brad, there are conflicting worldviews at play is this situation. I wouldn't call it 'death with dignity' vs. 'life at all costs', though. I'd call it 'death to the burdensome, inconvenient and defective' vs. 'all life, no matter the form it takes, has intrinsic value' (and as such should not be forfeited lightly), and in end-of-life issues, a person's life should not be taken without something in writing definitively attesting to their wishes.

And decades old word of mouth 'wishes' (not remembered or revealed until 4 years after a multi-million dollar jury award that came 3 years after the incident causing the disability), nothing more than hearsay testimony, by an estranged spouse, which is hotly contested by natural family members with nothing to gain monetarily or materially should be insufficient to result in a court order resulting in death.

quote:
"Life and Death in America" – a stunning special investigative report that will start with the Terri Schiavo story, but will go on to expose as never before America's rapidly expanding euthanasia/"right-to-die" movement – will be the focus of an upcoming issue of WND's acclaimed monthly Whistleblower magazine.

Just as WND first brought the Schiavo saga to national attention in 2002, long before it hit the radar of the rest of the national media, this powerful Whistleblower edition will expose the entire, ever-enlarging death movement of which most Americans are not yet aware.

The issue will expose the movement's bizarre occult and New Age underpinnings, physician-assisted suicide, the increasingly common euthanizing of newborn babies in Scandinavia, and much more – including abortion, embryonic stem-cell research, human cloning and other aspects of the life issue. It's literally a "life-and-death" issue, and promises to go far beyond previous journalistic explorations.

Despite saturation press coverage of the Terri Schiavo case, Felos's New Age spirituality has not emerged as an issue. However, as Richard Land, head of the Southern Baptist Convention's Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission said to the St. Petersburg Times, the Terri Schiavo case represents a "clash of two very disparate civilizations – the Judeo-Christian civilization, which is based upon the sanctity of human life, and the neopagan, relativist, quality-of-life civilization."

Adds James A. Smith Sr., executive editor of the Florida Baptist Witness: "Both worldviews are in play in the Schiavo debate and it's long past time for the public to understand this."


http://www.worldnetdaily.com/news/article.asp?ARTICLE_ID=43550

And along with Erica, I too missed your comment concerning my statement that the condition of her cerebral cortex is unknown without the necessary tests being perfomed that would reveal its condition.
Denise
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169 posted 03-30-2005 03:59 PM       View Profile for Denise   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Denise

Understandable, Jim. The facts are a matter of record, which is a good thing since the other side isn't speaking about it.

And now I just heard that the 11th Circuit has again refused a de novo hearing.

How unfortunate.
Denise
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170 posted 03-30-2005 08:28 PM       View Profile for Denise   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Denise

quote:
The Emperor's New Robes
Posted: March 30, 2005
6:45 p.m. Eastern

© 2005 Ann Coulter


Opinions about the Schiavo case seem to break down less on morals than on basic knowledge of the facts of the case.

There are a lot of telling facts, but two big ones are:

 The only family member lobbying for Terri's death is her husband, who is affianced to a woman he's been living with for several years and with whom he already has two children. (Today's brain twister: Would you rather be O.J.'s girlfriend or Michael Schiavo's fiancee?)

 Terri's husband has refused to allow her to be given either an MRI or a PET scan, which are also known as: "The tests that could determine whether Terri is even in a permanent vegetative state." (I believe his exact words were, "PET scan? MRI? What do I look like, a guy who just won a $1 million malpractice settlement?")

On the basis of these facts, Pinellas County Judge George Greer found that it was Terri's wish to be starved to death. She requires no life support; all she needs is food and water. If being (a) on a liquid diet, and (b) unresponsive to one's estranged husband are now considered grounds for a woman's execution, wait until this news hits Beverly Hills!

Despite the media's idiotic claims that scores of courts have made painstaking findings of fact over 15 years that Terri is in a permanent vegetative state and would have wanted to die, only one judge made such a finding. Other courts have not made any factual findings whatsoever. They simply refused to overturn Greer's findings of fact as an abuse of discretion.

Greer made his finding based on the testimony of Terri's husband that Terri said she wouldn't want to live like this – a rather important fact the husband only remembered many years after Terri was first injured, but one year after he won a million-dollar malpractice award and began living with another woman. (Maybe when Terri said, "I wouldn't want to live like that" she was referring to being married to Michael Schiavo.)

Supporting the idea that positions on the Schiavo case are correlated with IQ, on the pro-killing side is Rep. Chris Shays, R-Conn., who denounced the legislation granting federal courts jurisdiction over Terri's case, saying the Republican Party "has become a party of theocracy." Yes, you remembered correctly: The House passed the bill overwhelmingly in a 203-58 vote, and the Senate passed it in a voice vote also with overwhelming support. (Surely, if anyone would defend the practice of being on a liquid diet, you'd think Ted Kennedy would.)

Also on the pro-killing side are conservatives still pissed off about the Civil Rights Act of 1964 who are desperately hoping to be elected "most consistent constitutionalist" by their local Federalist Society chapters.

You can't grow peanuts on your own land or install a toilet capable of disposing two tissues in one flush because of federal government intervention. But Congress demands a review of the process that goes into a governmental determination to kill an innocent American woman – and that goes too far!

It's not a radical extension of current constitutional doctrines – even the legitimate ones! – for the federal government to assert a constitutional right to life that cannot be denied without due process of law under the Fifth and 14th Amendments. Congress didn't ask for much, just the same due process John Wayne Gacy got.

But people even stupider than lawyers have picked up on the vague rumblings from "most consistent constitutionalist" aspirants and begun to claim that Congress' action is an affront to "limited government."

Of course, the most limited of all possible governments is a king. We don't have that sort of "limited government." What we have is divided government: three branches of government at the federal level and 50 states with their own versions of checks and balances.

Or at least that was the government designed for us by men smarter than we are. We haven't had that sort of government for decades.

Alexander Hamilton's famous last words in "The Federalist" described the judiciary as the "least dangerous branch," because it had neither force nor will. Now the judiciary is the most dangerous branch. It doesn't need force because it has smoke and mirrors and a lot of people defending the moronic scribblings of any judge as the perfect efflorescence of "the rule of law."

This week, an indisputably innocent woman will be killed by the government for one reason: Judge Greer of Pinellas County, Fla., ordered it.

Polls claim that a majority of Americans objected to action by the U.S. Congress in the Schiavo case as "government intrusion" into a "private family matter" – as if Judge Greer is not also the government. So twisted is our view of the judiciary that a judicial decree is treated like a naturally occurring phenomenon, like a rainbow or an act of God.

Our infallible, divine ruler is a county judge in Florida named George Greer, who has more authority in America than the U.S. Congress, the president and the governor. No wonder the Southern Baptist Church threw Greer out: Only one god per church!

It's a good system if you like monarchy and legally sanctioned murder. But spare me the paeans to "strict constructionism" and "limited government."

http://www.worldnetdaily.com/news/article.asp?ARTICLE_ID=43569


Denise
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171 posted 03-30-2005 08:42 PM       View Profile for Denise   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Denise

And the 'spin' is already in from CBS for her obituary: Notice that they already know ahead of time that Michael was at her bedside when she died surrounded by stuffed animals and medical equipment on her bed (what medical equipment would that have been, I wonder?) Such talented people, seeing into the future like that! In all reality, Felos spent thousands of dollars from Terri's trust account to 'handle' the press. I guess that even extends to her obituary.

Note: She isn't dead yet.
http://www.worldnetdaily.com/news/article.asp?ARTICLE_ID=43558

LoveBug
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172 posted 03-30-2005 08:54 PM       View Profile for LoveBug   Email LoveBug   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for LoveBug

Brad, you said NOTHING in response to Denise's comments on the cerebral cortex, you only followed up with your 'circus' comment.

So YEAH, I think you didn't comment on it. OH WELL

Love's a lovely lad
His bringing up is beauty
Who loves him not is mad
For I must pay him duty
-Anonymous

SEA
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with you


173 posted 03-30-2005 08:59 PM       View Profile for SEA   Email SEA   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for SEA

that makes me sick...
like he would be at her bedside....
more like reaching for the champagne...
Denise
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174 posted 03-30-2005 09:49 PM       View Profile for Denise   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Denise

*groan*

It just gets more bizarre by the moment. No wonder Michael Schiavo was not worried about the autopsy. Florida law says that the actual autoposy documents and/or photos are only made public at the discretion of the legal next of kin...which in this case is him. So he doesn't even need a corrupt Pinellas County medical examiner in his pocket. He can just say whatever he pleases to say the report says.

But it doesn't really matter anyway in all reality. I read an article by a medical examiner today and he stated that it is not even possible to determine by autopsy that someone did or did not have PVS, since that is a clinical diagnosis, open to interpretation, and not something that a medical examiner could determine. And decades old healed bone fractures won't tell how they were broken, just that they were.

SEA, one thing I will bet on is that when it becomes quite obvious that she only has a few hours or moments to live, he will have her family escorted out so that they can't be with her, whether he is or not. I think that is how cruel he is. I could be wrong, but I just think he will do that. And if he does, her brother will tell us that...and I won't be surprised in the least.

So very very sad.
 
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