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Passions in Poetry

To Waiters and Waitresses

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Essorant
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0 posted 11-18-2006 02:15 PM       View Profile for Essorant   Email Essorant   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit Essorant's Home Page   View IP for Essorant


"How is your guys's meal?"

Terrible, terrible grammar.  Avoid it at all times!

Marge Tindal
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1 posted 11-18-2006 02:52 PM       View Profile for Marge Tindal   Email Marge Tindal   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit Marge Tindal's Home Page   View IP for Marge Tindal

It is an awful abuse of grammar usage~

Also, it is my opinion that referring to those of us who happen to be ladies as "you guys" is also poor service industry training and manners~

This has always just been one of those little pet-peeves that rubs me the wrong way~
Grinch
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2 posted 11-18-2006 06:45 PM       View Profile for Grinch   Email Grinch   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Grinch


Sounds like a pretty acceptable use of language to me however grammatically incorrect, after all it fulfils the main requirement of language in that it communicates something I can understand.

If this was written on the bottom of a menu or notice board I could understand the fuss but language is a flexible thing especially when spoken, if it wasn't the waiter would be saying "doth the meal please thee sire". If a waiter or waitress asked me the question I would be more likely to thank them for asking and give them an honest reply rather than pointing out their grammatical error.

Just my opinion
Ringo
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3 posted 11-18-2006 07:04 PM       View Profile for Ringo   Email Ringo   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Ringo

Actually, having spent much of my youth in the South, I usually used the phrase "How's y'all's order?"
Later, when I graduated out of the lesser restaurants and diners, "I changed it to, "Is everything alrgiht?".

The right way (as opposed to "proper") depends on where you are working at the time.

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ChristianSpeaks
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4 posted 11-20-2006 03:54 PM       View Profile for ChristianSpeaks   Email ChristianSpeaks   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for ChristianSpeaks

I too grew up in the "How's ya'll's food?" part of the world. To me I think that it's some what endearing. My question would be, did the question take anything away from your dining experience? If it didn't - who cares. We choose to use the grammar we are most comfortable with. Others are not required to do so. However, I can recall myself saying, "Is that all ya'll want?" to a customer. So my opinion may not mean much.

CS
Essorant
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5 posted 11-20-2006 09:33 PM       View Profile for Essorant   Email Essorant   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit Essorant's Home Page   View IP for Essorant

People can fuss about intricate little things about makeup and good looks, money, cars, computers, websites, and other physical and often superficial things, yet a little care-taking of the language-something that is used with almost everything we do-- is too much to ask for?  Too much to call women ladies or at least women, instead of guys? And at a public service such as a restaurant, where one is serving people and trying to give a good impression?  I think it is a great carelessness when waiters and waitresses at a restaurant go about with bad grammar and manners in a phrase and routine that they will be doing over and over again at almost every table they deal with. It shows carelessness on the part of the people running the restaurant that they don't teach their workers good courtesy and ettiquette.   It is not much different from going from table to table with bad body odour.  

ChristianSpeaks
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6 posted 11-26-2006 01:39 AM       View Profile for ChristianSpeaks   Email ChristianSpeaks   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for ChristianSpeaks

Incorrect. I have worked in food service. There has nor will there be time or money for English lessons to those who work for less than minimum wage. If you are looking for not only fine food but fine gramatical structure you must pay more than 10 dollars for your steak.

CS
Ringo
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7 posted 11-26-2006 08:30 AM       View Profile for Ringo   Email Ringo   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Ringo

Actually, Essorant, I have worked as a waiter in fine dining and in diners, and almost everything in between. I went- as a matter of fact- from a semi-fine dining restaurant in Virginia to an IHOP in Sacramento, Ca, and the two waiting styles and speech patterns were necessarily different.
When I first got to the IHOP, I was doing my normal waiting routines (the ones that I picked up from the first restaurant) and made almost nothing in tips. My manager told me to lighten up, and remember our clientele (especially on the over night shift). I dropped into "y'all" and "guys", and "hey", and cracking jokes, and totally improper body posture... and became one of the highest paid waiters there.
People in diners and coffee shops and such do not expect, and do not like the proper grammer and speech patters required for a more formal establishment where you would take a prom date, or where you would propose to your girl.

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Marge Tindal
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8 posted 11-26-2006 09:30 AM       View Profile for Marge Tindal   Email Marge Tindal   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit Marge Tindal's Home Page   View IP for Marge Tindal

Ringo~
quote:
People in diners and coffee shops and such do not expect, and do not like the proper grammer and speech patters required for a more formal establishment
While that might be your personal observations, my friend, that simply does not apply to everyone of us~

I frequent diners, coffee shops, fast food chains and fine dining establishments ... I would expect, and prefer, proper grammer at each of them~

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ChristianSpeaks
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9 posted 11-29-2006 10:57 AM       View Profile for ChristianSpeaks   Email ChristianSpeaks   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for ChristianSpeaks

The only thing that you can expect from people in the service industry is exactly that; service. For one to expect more than that is to expect something for which said individual is not getting paid. Good servers do add to your dining experiece, but for you to EXPECT proper language is boorish. If you want proper language take in a play, if you want a good steak go to Stella's; where the wait staff is rude and if you're not careful they'll pour a milkshake on your head.

cs
Essorant
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10 posted 11-30-2006 01:57 AM       View Profile for Essorant   Email Essorant   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit Essorant's Home Page   View IP for Essorant

I would rewrite your first sentence thus:

The only thing that you can expect from people in the service industry is exactly that; good service, including good grammar.

Christopher
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11 posted 11-30-2006 11:23 AM       View Profile for Christopher   Email Christopher   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Christopher

I would agree with Ess - service isn't just the delivery of food. Granted, one expects more, the more they pay for their meal, but regardless of whether I'm in a 5-Star restaurant or Denny's, I expect the person to provide that service to the best of their abilities. As a rule, waiters and waitresses only receive a pittance for salary... in many cases less than minimum wage. Their true take home is dependent on the level of service they provide to their customers and their customers' appreciation shown in the monetary form of a tip.

I can tell you that I, for one, am unlikely to tip more than a little (if at all) for poor or unprofessional service.

Exceptional service, however, even in a cheap diner, is apt to be rewarded well.

Grammar is part of that service - it's a professional attitude that should be seen as a necessary part of the job, rather than something one would do as "over and above."

For the initial question, I would say the query SHOULD be, "How is your meal?" It is automatically implied, by nature of the expected service, that "your" includes all the patrons at that table.
ChristianSpeaks
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12 posted 11-30-2006 11:51 AM       View Profile for ChristianSpeaks   Email ChristianSpeaks   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for ChristianSpeaks

Christopher-

Here's my question: Would you tip more than a "little or none at all" for kind service? What if that kind service came with a few dropped r's or a "Ya'll" or two?

Ess-
It is nakedly obvious that you have never worked in the food service industry. I truly hope I never was your server in my past life. Thank God for a salary.

CS
Christopher
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13 posted 11-30-2006 12:35 PM       View Profile for Christopher   Email Christopher   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Christopher

CS: I'll bend a little and say that, yes, kind service will ameliorate some of the grating a minor level of poor grammar has done. However, I must add, I don't think that's an excuse for poor grammar. If the grammar is exceedingly bad, kind service isnít likely to make much of a difference. I appreciate that some people may have the best intentions in the world or be the kindest people, but Iím going to that restaurant for the service and believe that part of that service is a professional front. Part of professionalism is a relatively educated manner of speech. Just my opinion. I have known many in the food service business (met a grand total of 3 exís in their course of duty as waitresses). I both understand and sympathize with what they go through. I know the first time a customer got smart with me, Iíd get right smart back. It takes a unique personality and an incredibly large amount of patience and diligence. If those traits are there, why then would it be so terribly much to ask that their speech be correct as well?

Again, just my opinion.

On the flip side, the examples you've given can be owed more to location and accent rather than poor grammar. A waitress with a cute southern accent already had her tip increased 5% just by opening her mouth. If she's really cute...
ChristianSpeaks
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14 posted 11-30-2006 01:39 PM       View Profile for ChristianSpeaks   Email ChristianSpeaks   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for ChristianSpeaks

Amen to the cute southern accent!!
ChristianSpeaks
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15 posted 11-30-2006 01:39 PM       View Profile for ChristianSpeaks   Email ChristianSpeaks   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for ChristianSpeaks

Amen to the cute southern accent!!

(and the congregation says "amen")
Essorant
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16 posted 11-30-2006 02:13 PM       View Profile for Essorant   Email Essorant   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit Essorant's Home Page   View IP for Essorant

Amen and women.  Be politically correct!
ChristianSpeaks
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17 posted 11-30-2006 02:28 PM       View Profile for ChristianSpeaks   Email ChristianSpeaks   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for ChristianSpeaks

Point Taken.

Will the court reporter please correct the statement to read " Amen and A women,"
 
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