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Passions in Poetry

What Makes a Word English?

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Essorant
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since 08-10-2002
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0 posted 06-07-2005 01:55 AM       View Profile for Essorant   Email Essorant   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit Essorant's Home Page   View IP for Essorant



At dictionary.com (whose source is The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language)  we find yin and yang.  

Just because these words are in the english dictionary, do you consider them "English"?  

What do you think makes a word "English"?  
Kaos
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since 08-02-2001
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between space and time


1 posted 10-09-2005 05:16 PM       View Profile for Kaos   Email Kaos   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Kaos

aren't most english words some kind of derrivative of latin? or am i supposed to be seeing something else here?  well, that wouldn't work would it... b/c there's slang terminology to every language and they're a derrivative of nothing more than the lingo of that particular area?

"Do not go gentle into that good night,
Old age should burn and rave at close of day;
Rage, rage against the dying of the light"
-Dylan Thomas

Michael
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2 posted 10-09-2005 06:41 PM       View Profile for Michael   Email Michael   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Michael

Hmmm...


Wonder if deja vu is found there.

Haven't we been through this before?
http://piptalk.com/pip/Forum8/HTML/000600.html
Essorant
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3 posted 10-10-2005 01:05 AM       View Profile for Essorant   Email Essorant   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit Essorant's Home Page   View IP for Essorant

Repetition is the mother of learning.
steavenr
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4 posted 01-17-2006 08:35 PM       View Profile for steavenr   Email steavenr   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit steavenr's Home Page   View IP for steavenr

“A wird (sic) is considered American English if it can be misspelled, mispronounced or mishandled in form, function, or fashion by users of differing dialects, deflections, or diacritical parsings.  It may be monosyllabic, ethno-syllabic, neo- or classic syllabic, but must never be syllabic-syllabic.  They may be rhymed or unrhymed, capitalized or socialistic, recognized parts of speech.  The same word in English English is acceptable only when ‘propah’.”

--copied from “When is a Word English, for Dummies” copyright 2009

sorry (he winks slyly) … I couldn’t resist…
Grinch
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5 posted 01-17-2006 09:39 PM       View Profile for Grinch   Email Grinch   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Grinch


When a word is commonly used and the meaning understood by a majority of English speaking people it becomes part of the English language.

It then tends to be misspelled, mispronounced and misused by Americans. (this is a joke no lynch mobs PLEASE)

Essorant
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6 posted 01-30-2006 12:11 AM       View Profile for Essorant   Email Essorant   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit Essorant's Home Page   View IP for Essorant

"it becomes part of the English language"


Yes, a foreign part  

ecrivan
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7 posted 03-08-2006 10:26 AM       View Profile for ecrivan   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit ecrivan's Home Page   View IP for ecrivan

That English is not an exact science, has been said before. It has become modifed over time because of the influences exerted by the populations that inherited it along the way much the same way that French has become modified in Quebec and is distinct from it's Parisian base. English has it's Anglo-Saxon root which along with an  influence of Latin and to a lesser extent other European languages, brought about the language used in the Middle Ages. Words crossed over from the French, the Spaniards the Danes not to mention other peoples, as cultures mixed and conflicts occurred.
As time progresses words are adopted from cultures external to where the language originated much like the word "kiosk" became used as a word for newstand in Canada but wasn't prevalent in the 1920's. As a greater number of people began to use the word it gained more popularity and was 'adopted' into the English language, Canadian English that is.

Essorant
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8 posted 03-10-2006 10:41 AM       View Profile for Essorant   Email Essorant   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit Essorant's Home Page   View IP for Essorant

But the English language still has its own "science" and the pieces or words thereof are still by far based most on that science, distinct in their formation, grammar, sounds, syllable-length, from foreign ways, that is in a specific dialectal way, because they are a specific dialect or group of dialects of Germanic known as English.  "Paternal' simply isn't English in the same way fatherly is.  Spiritual isn't English in the same way ghostly is, even if  it is used more and more familiar to us now a days.  Nor is Card- in Cardiogram or Cord- in cordial the same as the word heart, even though they come from the same root, and mean the same thing.  One is a Greekish form, the other is the latinish, and the third is English for the word that means "heart"  So even though foreign words may be part of the science, and even part of our English science,  doesn't mean they are the same as those that come directly from English and English's roots.


 
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