How to Join Member's Area Private Library Search Today's Topics p Login
Main Forums Discussion Tech Talk Mature Content Archives
   Nav Win
 Main Forums
 English Workshop
 Comma, How do you spell that? LOL
 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
Follow us on Facebook

 Moderated by: Christopher   (Admins )

 
User Options
Format for Better Printing EMail to a Friend Not Available
Admin Print Send ECard
Passions in Poetry

Comma, How do you spell that? LOL

 Post A Reply Post New Topic   Go to the Next Oldest/Previous Topic Return to Topic Page Go to the Next Newest Topic 
Jeffrey Carter
Deputy Moderator 1 TourDeputy Moderator 1 TourDeputy Moderator 1 TourDeputy Moderator 1 Tour
Member Elite
since 04-08-2000
Posts 2424
State of constant confusion!


0 posted 05-22-2004 11:59 AM       View Profile for Jeffrey Carter   Email Jeffrey Carter   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Jeffrey Carter


Hi, anyone want to break down this sentence and punctuate it properly. Break it into multiple sentences if you need to, but be sure to use commas where they are needed. After re-writing the sentence grammaticly correctly, give an explanation why you used certain punctuation in each instance.

quote:
The spotted cowís calf two teams of horses and the accompanying wagons and a heard of wooly white mountain goats charged without thinking of the consequences toward the barn door which needed to be taken down anyway and apparently thatís why Cowboy Jim was called.


Michelle_loves_Mike
Deputy Moderator 1 TourDeputy Moderator 1 Tour
Senior Member
since 12-20-2003
Posts 1200
Pennsylvania


1 posted 05-22-2004 01:33 PM       View Profile for Michelle_loves_Mike   Email Michelle_loves_Mike   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Michelle_loves_Mike

The spotted cowís calf, two teams of horses' with the accompanying wagons, and a heard of wooly, white, mountain goats, charged without thinking of the consequences, toward the barn door, which needed to be taken down anyway. Apparently thatís why Cowboy Jim was called.

The commas are placed where I put them, to keep the structure flowing, without bunching it up, I replaced the "and" with "with" in regaurds to the wagons, 'cause it was to many ands (lol), I broke off the last line into it's own sentence, because it didn't go with the body of the long, run on , sentence,,,,as for tenses, propers and such,,,,fake it, lol!

Michelle


I wish all could find the true happiness I have found,,in the eyes of Mike
Jeffrey Carter
Deputy Moderator 1 TourDeputy Moderator 1 TourDeputy Moderator 1 TourDeputy Moderator 1 Tour
Member Elite
since 04-08-2000
Posts 2424
State of constant confusion!


2 posted 05-23-2004 03:36 AM       View Profile for Jeffrey Carter   Email Jeffrey Carter   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Jeffrey Carter

Any English or Grammar teachers out there want to look at this and tell me how close it is to being correct? If so, and it is partially incorrect, could you please explain what parts aren't correct? Thanks!

*****************************************

The spotted cowís calf, a herd of wooly, white mountain goats, and two teams of horses (with accompanying wagons) charged, without thinking of the consequences, toward the barn door, which needed to be taken down anyway. Apparently, thatís why Cowboy Jim was called.

The comma after calf was put there to separate it from the next item in the series.

The comma between wooly and white was put there because they are coordinate adjectives and need to be separated.

The comma after goats was put there, again, to separate it from the next item in the series.

I put the parentheses around the words with accompanying wagons because it is worthwhile, but secondary information.

The comma before and after which needed to be taken down anyway was added because it is a non-essential item that only adds extra information to the sentence.

I chose to break off the last part of the sentence and make it a sentence by itself because, well, frankly it reads better that way. I put the comma after Apparently because it is an introductory word.  
Essorant
Member Elite
since 08-10-2002
Posts 4689
Regina, Saskatchewan; Canada


3 posted 05-27-2004 10:28 AM       View Profile for Essorant   Email Essorant   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit Essorant's Home Page   View IP for Essorant

How about this:

The calf , two horse-teams with wagons, and some mountain goats, without thinking of consequences, charged toward the barn-door which needed to be taken down.   Thatís why Cowboy Jim was called.


wings of the moon
Member
since 03-27-2003
Posts 325
Pink bubblegum land


4 posted 06-05-2004 10:44 AM       View Profile for wings of the moon   Email wings of the moon   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for wings of the moon

its towardS isn't it?
Jeffrey Carter
Deputy Moderator 1 TourDeputy Moderator 1 TourDeputy Moderator 1 TourDeputy Moderator 1 Tour
Member Elite
since 04-08-2000
Posts 2424
State of constant confusion!


5 posted 06-07-2004 02:33 AM       View Profile for Jeffrey Carter   Email Jeffrey Carter   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Jeffrey Carter

Actually if I'm not mistaken, it can be either toward or towards. They both mean the same thing and they are both listed in Webster's under the same heading. When used as a preposition it means: In the direction of, regarding; in aid of; for; about.  When used as an adverb it means: At hand, going on.

Ok, so you already knew all that LOL I just got my new version of Webster's, so I thought I'd practice using it
Essorant
Member Elite
since 08-10-2002
Posts 4689
Regina, Saskatchewan; Canada


6 posted 06-08-2004 01:04 AM       View Profile for Essorant   Email Essorant   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit Essorant's Home Page   View IP for Essorant

The -s in towards is the same that you see in a word like "Ron's",  indicating possessive case, but used traditionally and specially in an adverbial manner.
For some reason though these words are never used with an apostrophe to show that, so it is difficult to tell that it is that -s we are allfamiliar with.    

Adays  - by day
Anights  - by night
Besides  - by side
Betimes  - in time
Words and deeds  - by word and by deed
Lifes   - with life
Selfwills - of one's own will
Anon-rights - right at once
God's Thanks -through God's grace
Hitherwards  -in this direction
Unawares  --in unawareness
Whiles  --in while

So rightly perhaps they should be spelt aday's, anight's, beside's, word's and deed's, Life's, Selfwill's, Anon-right's, God's Thank's, Hitherward's, Unaware's, While's.    

[This message has been edited by Essorant (06-08-2004 11:08 PM).]

Essorant
Member Elite
since 08-10-2002
Posts 4689
Regina, Saskatchewan; Canada


7 posted 06-30-2004 01:50 AM       View Profile for Essorant   Email Essorant   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit Essorant's Home Page   View IP for Essorant

Needs - of necessity
Else -  otherwise
Thanks - willingly
Wills - willingly
Daylongs - for a day
Somes - in some degree
Tomids - in the middle
Jeffrey Carter will be notified of replies
 Post A Reply Post New Topic   Go to the Next Oldest/Previous Topic Return to Topic Page Go to the Next Newest Topic 
All times are ET (US) Top
  User Options
>> Main Forums >> English Workshop >> Comma, How do you spell that? LOL Format for Better Printing EMail to a Friend Not Available
Print Send ECard

 

pipTalk Home Page | Main Poetry Forums

How to Join | Member's Area / Help | Private Library | Search | Contact Us | Today's Topics | Login
Discussion | Tech Talk | Archives | Sanctuary



© Passions in Poetry and netpoets.com 1998-2013
All Poetry and Prose is copyrighted by the individual authors