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Obama or Clinton (Very curious what you think either one's chance might be at becoming President?)

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Mysteria
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0 posted 12-12-2006 09:22 PM       View Profile for Mysteria   Email Mysteria   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Mysteria

I have to tell you I absolutely love Senator Barack Obama, and in fact, Hillary Clinton is no slouch either.  However, I am wondering is America ready to vote in a woman, or an African American President?

I have followed Senator's Obama's career, and I have to tell you I am darn excited about the possibility of seeing him get elected.  
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1 posted 12-13-2006 12:11 AM       View Profile for Mysteria   Email Mysteria   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Mysteria

I found this article sort of interesting.  It's one perspective I guess that could be considered too.

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2 posted 12-13-2006 03:12 PM       View Profile for Balladeer   Email Balladeer   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit Balladeer's Home Page   View IP for Balladeer

Well, it's not hard to follow his career, since he has only been in Congress since 2004. He seems  to be an able congressman. Can that convert into an able President? Who can say?

Hillary? I don't see it. Not only don't the republicans like her, many Democrats don't like her, either. She does not give one the impression that she can be trusted. Combine that with a personality matched only by Vlad the Impaler and I don't see her getting the nod.

Hillary would insure  a Republican victory. Obama would make it a race.
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3 posted 12-14-2006 02:03 AM       View Profile for Mysteria   Email Mysteria   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Mysteria

Thank you Michael, nice to know your thoughts on the subject.  I sure do hope he does advance in the system down there though, I really happen to like that guy even though he is green.  Who knows maybe next time he may still be around?

I agree with you on Hillary
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4 posted 12-16-2006 02:59 PM       View Profile for Mistletoe Angel   Email Mistletoe Angel   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit Mistletoe Angel's Home Page   View IP for Mistletoe Angel



Barack Obama definitely has a great shot I believe.

He has the charisma that has attracted thousands to his speeches nationally, from his personal reflections on growing up with his Kenyan father Barack Hussein Obama Sr. and his Wichita, Kansas mother Ann Durham, and forming an image of his father from stories told to him by his mother and grandparents, to his growing up internationally in Jakarta, to learning of the importance of community through his educational experiences helping with housing projects on Chicago's South Side that is reminiscent of something out of "Slim's Table", to reflecting on the realities of race in America and being serious and conscious of them without being bitter either.

He is a Democrat who holds true to what he believes in in sentimental terms without being overtly partisan and willing to seek a middle ground between what's often described as reactionary conservatism and idealistic liberalism. This is something which I believe most Americans have always desired, but feel is especially urgent now in their blood and bones, following two tumultuous sea changes resulting from an incompetent, partisan Congress until 1994 led by the Democrats to another incompetent, partisan Congress until 2006 led by the GOP.

And finally, his appeal is broad and not only intrigues Democrats; it intrigues moderates, independents and social conservatives as well. Obama is a senator who understands the value of faith and family, who understands we have a duty to reach out in a humanitarian manner to the less-fortunate in the world, like he has done for Africa through his frequent visits there, speaking of the importance of HIV testing, stopping ethnic-based politics and the importance of a diverse education, and leading the humanitarian efforts for Darfur with Senators Sam Brownback (R-KS) and Richard Durbin (D-IL).

The reason to be skeptical of Obama is obvious; he remains a fledgling experience-wise in national politics. But in any case you have to admire his idealism and "audacity of hope", and then again, many presidents of recent times here have had limited experience upon getting elected as well, including Jimmy Carter, Ronald Reagan and George W. Bush.

*

Hillary Clinton on the other hand, I highly doubt she can win. Like I said in The Alley thread, she epitomizes the personality of a political calculator more than anything to much of the public, and whereas with many candidates, while one can identify their political movements by their voting records, their movements are generally not immediate and more subtle, whereas with both Clinton and McCain, every movement they make is obvious, and thus feels so artificial, so opportunistic.

45% said in one poll there's "no chance" they'd vote for Hillary, almost half the panel, and the "undecided" column in public approval towards Hillary Clinton is in the single-digits, meaning she has barely any opportunity to re-invent herself.

Sincerely,
Noah Eaton


"If we have no peace, it is because we have forgotten that we belong to each other"

Mother Teresa
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5 posted 12-22-2006 04:52 PM       View Profile for ChristianSpeaks   Email ChristianSpeaks   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for ChristianSpeaks

The first thing that I find interesting and absolutly wonderful is that people are debating rather a man of mixed race (who looks black) or a woman will gain the nomination. This shows forward thinking in American politics.

I don't think that Hillary will have much chance because she is so steeped in Washington politics and having already spent 8 years in the White House brings plenty of baggage to the table.

Obama is a ferocious public speaker. He is calm and believable, BUT he has no clear platform as of yet.

I think that whoever can split the moderate thinking most successfully will win because Republicans are fed up with what is happening. I don't think the GOP is going to bring anyone to the table that will convince the the GOP voters they can rebound the party. It's time for something new. Question: if you are registered republican can you vote Democrat? Keeping my options open.

cs
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6 posted 12-27-2006 11:03 PM       View Profile for kaila   Edit/Delete Message     View IP for kaila

I have seen nothing substantive from Obama; I would probably vote for Hillary if she were the choice against almost any Republican, but I do not think that enough people support her.

I keep hoping that someone new moves to the front of the Democratic party.


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7 posted 02-06-2007 12:08 PM       View Profile for Mysteria   Email Mysteria   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Mysteria

Wow and now this morning I read Rudi Giuliani is now in the running...the mix thickens.
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8 posted 02-06-2007 03:08 PM       View Profile for LeeJ   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for LeeJ

I would vote for Rudi, for me, so far, he is a likely candidate, which I'm certainly going to research further.

I feel the issue shouldn't be should a woman or black man be president.  I really believe the best person should win, defined by experiences, beliefs and issues, and that this time, we should all, including myself, really, really study the issues and research each candidates policies. I don't believe we should vote for someone on one issue, of because I am a certain party so I need to vote for someone of the same??????

Hillary is a VERY intelligent woman, but...there is a lot about her that reaks, dictative....and they have caught her in lies regarding voting for the present war in Iraq.    

I also do not think it should be about which Party, but more so, the ability of the person running and how they stand on all issues, not just one issue....

thanks Sharon for this thread...very interesting.

[This message has been edited by LeeJ (02-07-2007 10:53 AM).]

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9 posted 02-06-2007 07:56 PM       View Profile for Poet deVine   Email Poet deVine   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Poet deVine

I would never vote for Hillary. (it doesn't matter to me that she's a woman)


I would have to know a lot more about Obama's platform/politics before I'd commit to voting for him (it doesn't matter to me that he's black)

Rudy? Nope. I don't think he could handle the foreign policies. (I loved him in NY after 9/11 though)

Right now, it's anybody's race...

This time I think I'll toss a coin..
Mysteria
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10 posted 02-06-2007 09:19 PM       View Profile for Mysteria   Email Mysteria   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Mysteria

Well I have to tell you were I an American citizen I wouldn't vote for Hilary either, and I would just love to see a woman in there, but not her.

I love Obama, but he may be too green, and you are right I am watching this one with great interest, wondering if Hilary gets in how many will move up to Canada.

Anyone's race now.
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11 posted 02-07-2007 09:42 AM       View Profile for Not A Poet   Email Not A Poet   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit Not A Poet's Home Page   View IP for Not A Poet

"...wondering if Hilary gets in how many will move up to Canada."

You mean like all those Hollywood types who were goig to leave the country 6 years ago if Bush won? Well, we're still waiting (and wishing in some cases) for them to keep their promise.
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12 posted 02-07-2007 12:44 PM       View Profile for Poet deVine   Email Poet deVine   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Poet deVine

Yeah...a certain Baldwin sure is doing well with his new TV series...too bad it's not on Canadian TV!!
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13 posted 02-08-2007 01:24 AM       View Profile for Mysteria   Email Mysteria   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Mysteria

If you mean 30 Rock we get it up here Sharon, but I tevo it as it competes with CSI and the world stops in my house for CSI.
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14 posted 02-08-2007 02:59 AM       View Profile for Mistletoe Angel   Email Mistletoe Angel   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit Mistletoe Angel's Home Page   View IP for Mistletoe Angel

Bill Richardson is currently my favorite 2008 hopeful, and I'll tell y'all why.

Richardson has served seven terms in Congress, has been an ambassador to the United Nations, has visited many foreign countries on diplomatic aims, and also served as the U.S Secretary of Energy, which makes for an immense credibility on international affairs few can match. I  especially respect him for his recent dedication to the humanitarian crisis in Darfur, who last month went to Sudan and tried to broker a 60-day cease-fire with President al-Bashir and rebel group leaders.

With all that considered, I think Richardson is that kind of candidate who would be most effective at improving our image in the eyes of the international community. Moreover, with his experience as a U.S energy secretary, he would encourage a great discussion about energy policy, and also as a governor of New Mexico, he has a strong record on greenhouse gas emissions control, which global warming concerns are certain to be a major 2008 campaign topic, something which not just Bill Richardson, but candidates like Barack Obama and John McCain are talking about also.

Finally, Bill Richardson is popular among both Democrats and Republicans in New Mexico (seventh most popular with 74% job approval according to the most recent monthly SurveyUSA 50 Governor approval tracking poll), who is commended for often reaching across the aisle and was even touted by the libertarian organization known as the CATO Institute for being one of the most fiscally responsible Democratic governors in the nation, where indeed both his experience as a governor and a U.S representative serves him well.

Of course, Bill Richardson is a huge underdog currently and is well behind both Clinton, Obama and Edwards in money and name-recognition. However, I believe, especially when we still have almost an entire year before the 2008 presidential primaries, that there is more than enough time for a come-behind campaign to take the top slot like Bill Clinton did in 1992, where nobody had even heard of him until after October of 1991. And the real reason I believe all kinds of candidates from George W. Bush in 2000, Bill Clinton in 1992, and Ronald Reagan in 1980, pulled it off then was because of their huge likeability factors, and likeability historically is what elects our presidents.

I think as people get a look at lower-profiled candidates like Richardson, they will begin to like him and gain interest in him. Candidates like Biden and Clinton, on the other hand, sort of stand out in contrast to those like Bill Clinton and Ronald Reagan because both have reputations for anger and sourness, which historically hurts candidates. The main reason John Kerry struggled much of the 2004 election season was because he wasn't seen as real likeable to the American public. The public saw him as too angry, too serious, too pretentious and too elitist, whereas President Bush, even if you disagreed with his politics heavily, still seemed likeable and at least appeared like a regular guy.

I think Hillary Clinton lacks the intensity of likeability Bill Clinton had, and that's why I believe this contest is far from over, and much of the American public are going to be looking for other candidates out there who resonate with both that personal brand of charm and integrity, which they've already begun finding with Barack Obama, despite his lack of political experience, and can certainly continue to find in candidates like Bill Richardson.

*

On the GOP side, Rudy Giuliani is thus far the most appealing candidate to me, who I believe is genuinely interested in seeking more common ground in the political process, although I have reservations of his lack of political experience.

Also, I respect many GOP candidates in their own ways, yet are at odds with them in other ways. I highly respect Sam Brownback for his excellent leadership on the Darfur humanitarian issue, as well as other African issues like fighting HIV/AIDS and malaria and social issues here at home including poverty, and finally admire him in speaking out against the Iraq war surge, but am greatly at odds with him on many domestic issues including his stances on gay rights. I commend Chuck Hagel for having the courage to speak out against the handling of the Iraq war frequently and demanding a change in course, as well as his strong defense of civil liberties, but disagree with him on most other issues. And though I admire John McCain's efforts on campaign finance refrm and environmental conservation in particular, in heart I just don't trust McCain as a commander-in-chief and believe he'll be even more hawkish and stubborn as one.

Sincerely,
Noah Eaton


"If we have no peace, it is because we have forgotten that we belong to each other"

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15 posted 02-08-2007 11:07 AM       View Profile for Not A Poet   Email Not A Poet   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit Not A Poet's Home Page   View IP for Not A Poet

Well Noah my friend, this is one of those rare times that we pretty well agree politically. I too like Bill Richardson and expect he would make a good president. I absolutely do not trust Hillary. There have been way too many people over the years who have crossed her and somehow suffered a fatal "accident" or other untimely death. Based on many of his comments in the last dozen or so years, I'm not sure Biden has the brains to run a national campaign, much less be president. I have to wonder about the voters in Delaware.

Obama is an enigma. I can't figure how he has suddenly become so popular. With just two years in the senate and no significant legislation, what has he done to deserve such attention. True, he is a pretty face and apparently a very good speaker. Surely the voters will ask for more than that in a serious candidate for president. His time may come but I think he needs a lot more experience to be credible.

Richardson is by far my choice among the democrats. As for reaching across the aisle as governor, remember, Bush had a similar reputation as governor of Texas. I can't see that he has done much of that in DC. Of course, he got very little cooperation from the opposition though. If a democrat is elected president, I don't expect the republicans to be overly cooperative either.

I like McCain but I don't think he can be elected and I don't think he would make a very good president if he were elected. I'm afraid of some of his "mood swings" for lack of a better description. He needs to stay in the senate. On Brownback and Hagel, I don't like much of their agenda.

On the republican side, I currently lean toward Guiliani but I wonder if he can generate the broad-based appeal necessary to win. I also wonder if he can sway enough of the ultra-conservative wing of the party to even be nominated. It will also be interesting to see if his outstanding record in turning NYC around can overcome the skeletons I suspect he has in the closet.

I think Gov. Romney and former senator George Allen are interesting although Allen has lost some luster after his recent showing in the last senate race. Romney may face some religious hurdle too. Will wait and see on these.

Altogether, I expect it will be an interesting few months, lost of mud slung, unsupported accusations made and other dirty tricks. That is, interesting until we get completely fed up with the whole stinking mess.

Maybe we'll get lucky this time and get some patriots instead of the usual partisans. No, not gonna happen, I'm afraid.



Pete

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16 posted 02-08-2007 12:50 PM       View Profile for Mysteria   Email Mysteria   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Mysteria

I am getting the feeling that the citizens of the United States this time are sticking to the issues at hand, rather than voting for any particular party, and that I think is a very good thing.  I just hope the candidates show their true colors during their campaign and keep it clean, and stick to their agenda.  It will sure be an interesting election this year,  that is for darn sure.
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17 posted 02-08-2007 01:25 PM       View Profile for Mistletoe Angel   Email Mistletoe Angel   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit Mistletoe Angel's Home Page   View IP for Mistletoe Angel

And the mud-slinging has actually already began, with Joseph Biden's comments last week blasting all three big Democratic hopefuls (Clinton, Obama and Edwards) particularly on the issue of Iraq. Also, media interests have enaged in early mud-slinging, including MoveOn.org running anti-McCain ads already in Iowa, and the Fox News Channel running stories without sources about a Muslim school Obama is thought to have attended once.

I used to think Rudy Giuliani had absolutely no chance of earning the 2008 GOP nomination due to his positions on abortion and gay rights which place him at odds with most social conservatives, as well as the fact he's in his third marriage. Now I'm not so sure, for when I look at McCain now falling in the polls (he's below 50% in approval ratings for the first time in polling history) I wonder, especially with how last November it was more moderate Republicans who prevailed, including Arnold Schwarzenegger and Charlie Crist, moderate Republicans and Independents may be especially energized going into 2008 and can possibly outpace the other elements of the party.

If John McCain continues to fall, I think that can also provide an opening for a secondary candidate, and it could be anyone. It could be Chuck Hagel, who has already established himself prominently as the anti-war GOP candidate. It could be either Sam Brownback Duncan Hunter, who are attempting to portray themselves as the most definitive conservatives in the race (although I think the Duke Cunningham scandal may prevent Duncan Hunter from being elected). It could be Mike Huckabee (though I'm doubtful he has a chance in that social conservatives will be pointing fingers at him from one side for his increasing of state spending and tax hikes as Governor of Arkansas, while liberals will be pointing fingers from the other side for being too conservative due to his endorsement of creationism in particular.

In fact, despite his still relatively low name recognition, I'd say Mitt Romney is positioned stronger than ever in the 2008 race due to McCain's declining popularity. Of course, he has many obstacles ahead of him, where I think conservatives will still have a hard time trusting him in insisting that he was wrong for supporting gay marriage and abortion rights in the past and that he simply happens to be from the state of Massachusetts (often decried as an elitist, liberal bastion) while liberals will be attacking him for doing just that. His problem will be trying to define himself rather than others defining Romney.

Though I do agree with Sharon overall that 2008 will be more about a candidate's overall take on the issues rather than a party's take on them, I also agree with Pete that, unfortunately, the mud-slinging will inevitably come to a fever pitch months before the election even kicks into high gear, and partisanship will again get in the way of Americans talking about the issues together. I think Balladeer put it marvelously in another thread in that "It'll make "24" look like "Leave It To Beaver!"

Sincerely,
Noah Eaton


"If we have no peace, it is because we have forgotten that we belong to each other"

Mother Teresa
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18 posted 02-08-2007 02:36 PM       View Profile for LeeJ   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for LeeJ

I sure hope, the voters ask the candidates to explain in detail their plans this time.  It's easy to stand up and state, I have a plan...but this time, I hope voters ask them to be much more specific about the design of their plans, and demand explainations of what issues they intend to tackle.  What are their priorites and what do they plan to accomplish while being President?

This is a great thread Sharon thanks, and also, thanks for the comment you made on issues rather then parties....You go Girl...whooo hooo

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19 posted 02-08-2007 05:09 PM       View Profile for Balladeer   Email Balladeer   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit Balladeer's Home Page   View IP for Balladeer

We can ask them, LeeJ, but we won't get an answer. They will never give out details that they might have to live up to. As far as naming their issues, that's simple - health care, taxes, the economy. That has been the standard for the last couple of decades.

I have to smile at Hillary. When Bill was the big cheese she was put in charge of health care and, for eight years, came up with nothing. Now that she is running, she claims health care is an issue she will take care of. Perhaps she thinks everyone has short memories?
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20 posted 02-09-2007 10:45 AM       View Profile for Not A Poet   Email Not A Poet   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit Not A Poet's Home Page   View IP for Not A Poet

OMG, I failed to mention one of my absolute favorites. I think Sen. Lieberman is probably the bravest and most respectable and principled man in DC. I just read the text of his speach against cloture in the Senate here. If only he would run again, I could definately vote for him.
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21 posted 02-10-2007 04:31 PM       View Profile for Mistletoe Angel   Email Mistletoe Angel   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit Mistletoe Angel's Home Page   View IP for Mistletoe Angel

I think Joseph Lieberman is certainly much stronger than he has ever been in the U.S Senate, that's for sure, and because he has successfully to a certain degree defined himself from the most recent election season as an indepedently-minded politician that doesn't always stand stubbornly behind party lines, I think he would certainly have a great shot at winning moderate and Independent voters.

However, I think Joseph Lieberman would have a tough time winning over voters from both harder-line Democrats and Republicans. Lieberman's popularity among Democrats in his state has went down significantly ever since liberal blogs like DailyKos and the Huffington Post have gotten frustrated with his support of the Iraq war, reaching a fever pitch with that "Bush Kiss" moment that ignited Ned Lamont's fifteen minutes of fame, who won the Democratic primary but lost big in the main election. So Lieberman is far less popular among Democrats in his state of Connecticut than among Republicans, and as long as the Iraq war continues to drag on, the growing anti-war force in the Democratic Party is going to keep Lieberman from ever winning a primary.

Meanwhile, on the GOP front, even while Lieberman has grown support among Republicans in Connecticut commending him for his unique positioning on the war in Iraq and on foreign policy in general, many Republicans have not forgotten that Lieberman has a liberal voting record on just about everything else, thus are going to keep looking beyond the facade. Many GOP operatives are going to point out his 100% NARAL score (showing he has frequently voted pro-choice), they're going to point out his 0% Christian Coalition score (showing he has a solid "anti-family" voting record), they're going to point out his 15% NTU score (showing he's a "big spender" on tax votes) and will criticize his F grade from the National Rifle Association in particular. Thus, I think while many Republicans will say they respect Joseph Lieberman in many respects, they'll also say they just can't trust him, just as man Republicans are hesitant about trusting Mitt Romney.

I think Joseph Lieberman is that kind of candidate that could ignite excitement from the center, but antagonism from both the left and the right.

Sincerely,
Noah Eaton


"If we have no peace, it is because we have forgotten that we belong to each other"

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22 posted 02-10-2007 05:32 PM       View Profile for Not A Poet   Email Not A Poet   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit Not A Poet's Home Page   View IP for Not A Poet

Again, I completely agree. I don't think he could ever win or even be nominated, by either party. I just have to respect him as an independent thinker. I truly believe he is thinking more of his country than his party. Well, at least as much anyway.

I liked him long before the 2000 elections but pretty much wrote him off when he agreed to run with Gore. I have since apparently gotten over that.
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23 posted 02-10-2007 06:09 PM       View Profile for Alicat   Email Alicat   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Alicat

I realize 'Mr. Sterling' was a fictional Senatoral series, which I kinda liked.  Just like I enjoyed 'West Wing'.  Howsoever, one thing learned from that brief show was consensus, and how one's voting record may not give a true standard on reality, as quid pro quo exists among Reb and Dem, Lib and Con circles.  One Hand Washes The Other. You scratch my back on this bill you do not support, and I'll throw my substantial political backing behind your bill.  It's not about the 'common man', but agendas.  The common man is only trotted out during election cycles, then quietly put back in the closet until needed again.  Howsoever, that also tosses out voting records unless the senator/representative has been consitent over several voting cycles.
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24 posted 02-10-2007 06:32 PM       View Profile for Mistletoe Angel   Email Mistletoe Angel   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit Mistletoe Angel's Home Page   View IP for Mistletoe Angel

Joseph Lieberman indeed is an interesting personality. I've seen some speeches on the Senate floor from him, as well as some footage of the debates on C-SPAN from this recent election season, and he is very lucid and intellectual in how he talks about the issues.

I have to admit that I do find his stance on the Iraq war unfortunate, in my opinion, thus am weary of voting for him if he were a presidential nomination in the fear he'd be too hawkish and stubborn as a commander-in-chief. However, I do very much agree with his general concerns regarding foreign policy and how we must remain resolate and serious about the threats out there, and believe some of his own party could certainly learn something from Lieberman about how the Democratic Party establishment as a whole certainly can (and should) remain very critical about this particular war in Iraq, but also a the same time make themselves appear more willing to combat those who truly are threatening us, as while many truly be so at heart, when they are spending much time criticizing the administration, in terms of PR it makes the Democrats appear more forceful toward the president than to the violent militia groups.

I can't fault Lieberman for the latter at all here, which many liberals and Democrats are currently behaving; attacking him and accusing him of being anti-Democratic just because he's at odds with most of the party on that single issue, and absolutely believe the whole Ned Lamont stunt was most unfortunate; stabbing their own party member in the back. What particularly concerns me is that he's been too fearful of questioning the handling of this war, and that leaves me questioning if I could trust him as a commander-in-chief if he was left in that sort of position, where things continue to go not as we desired, and his proposal is to continue "staying the course".

I think that's why I admire Chuck Hagel's recent stance on both foreign policy and the Iraq war. When you look at his voting record over the past eleven years serving in the U.S Senate, he's been absolutely consistent in supporting the troops and has been most reliably pro-military, while also having the courage to criticize the leadership and situation of military policies when he feels something isn't going right. I don't agree with Hagel on most other things, but I think just as the Democrats can learn some things from Lieberman in appearing both critical of the war in Iraq and more willing to fight those directly responsible for attacks on us and our allies, the Republicans can learn some things from Hagel on how they can appear both strong on fighting terrorism globally yet also having the courage to stand up and question the mishandling of such policies when they happen.

I believe most Americans want us to rise above this sort of political correctness; that both parties are not reduced to this partisan lowest denominator. I truly believe both parties want to fight these terrorist groups, and I believe both parties believe sometimes we don't get the desired results we want in our policies and we have to accept "staying the course" won't work. Unfortunately, I believe political correctness has kept Congress largely divided with their toes behind two bold lines, and that's why it's important we look to people like Joseph Lieberman and James Webb in the Democratic Party and  Chuck Hagel and Arlen Specter in the Republican party as certain archetypal figures in how we can govern with both qualities.

Sincerely,
Noah Eaton


"If we have no peace, it is because we have forgotten that we belong to each other"

Mother Teresa
 
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