How to Join Member's Area Private Library Search Today's Topics p Login
Main Forums Discussion Tech Talk Mature Content Archives
   Nav Win
 Discussion
 pipTalk Lounge
 What can I do to stay sane until the pil
 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17
Follow us on Facebook

 Moderated by: Ron   (Admins )

 
User Options
Format for Better Printing EMail to a Friend Not Available
Admin Print Send ECard
Passions in Poetry

What can I do to stay sane until the pills kick in?

 Post A Reply Post New Topic   Go to the Next Oldest/Previous Topic Return to Topic Page Go to the Next Newest Topic 
Kethry
Member Rara Avis
since 07-29-2000
Posts 9235
Victoria Australia


0 posted 02-22-2001 03:43 PM       View Profile for Kethry   Email Kethry   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Kethry

For all of those who followed the depression and pills discussion. I've made a note of all the solutions, some of them were useful.

This is what I've tried and the results, maybe you can add others.

September - saw my doctor and got prescribed anti-depressants.
October - started seeing a therapist/counsellor
October - saw two other doctor's and got prescribed further medication
November - Tried cartharic writing, exercise and diet management
December - started seeing a psychiatrist, who counselled but also changed medication
January - tried herbal remedies, in particular to help me sleep.
January - talked to anyone and everyone indiscriminately on the net and spent five hours a day here. As a result of that I now have a couple of people I can't get rid of. If my judgement was sound I would never have spoken to them in the first place.
January - re-commenced work on light duties, (this may have been too early, given the work I do, but I needed to have a focus)
February - packed all my issues back in their boxes and tried to get on with my life.
February - change of medication by psychiatrist and change of blood pressure tablets by G.P. I don't think these guys even talk to each other let alone consult about medications. My G.P just asks what medication and dose I'm on. When I mention side effects he checks his book and if it's not there it doesn't exist.
September - February, sporadic attempts at healthy living, including no caffeine, eating regularly, exercising regularly, getting out when feeling bad, cartharic wrting including some bad choices to post, silly writing, poking fun at myself and others. Reading mostly about depression and it's effects but also light reading when I can concentrate.

So is there anything I could or should do that I'm not or anything that I should not be doing that I am?

Here is the second part of the question, Passions has been a great support to me on and off however I've made some really bad choices and suffered the consequences.

Given that most of my time was spent looking for answers from people I trusted how can these strategies you've shared so freely be used to help other people who maybe in the same boat. How can that cultivation of family of friends help others to make the appropriate connections to a site where they can be heard and not feel punished. For example I've only recently discovered the Alley and that was because someone told me. And although I've read the guidelines it's difficult to remember them all when everything else is so out of control.
Maybe there could be a link to the Alley or an advice site linked to Teen or Dark so that people who need it most could access online help. I understand that any advice would not be professional and maybe that needs to be spelled out to protect the site, but there must be some reputable people out there who are willing to re-inforce whatever positive messages are being given.

Thanks for listening
Keth



Those of us who refuse to risk and grow get swallowed up by life. Patty Hansen.


walker
Member Elite
since 02-11-2001
Posts 2348
Florida


1 posted 02-22-2001 04:26 PM       View Profile for walker   Email walker   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for walker

Kethry, first of all you are right. In the internet you have to be selective of what people tell you to do or no to do.Depression like, blood pressure has to be treated with medication. Eating healthy and exercising with your doctor advise, can help your depression as well as high blood pressure.
I would suggest keeping a journal, so that you can review the things that you did or ate on a particular good day.Also be careful of overthecounter medications they can effect your prescribed ones.Good luck!
serenity blaze
Member Empyrean
since 02-02-2000
Posts 28839


2 posted 02-22-2001 05:37 PM       View Profile for serenity blaze   Email serenity blaze   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for serenity blaze

You are already doing an excellent job of keeping track of your emotional ups and downs and time periods---what I did, though, was kept a daily log---in the moment that I found myself "losing it"? I would immediately remove myself and write in a journal...my exact emotions and feelings up to that point, include any meds I was on as well as dosage changes...feminine cycles etc. This was a wonderful tool for me as well as my therapist to discover what, if any, of my depression was caused by a)meds b)emotional response to subconscious "triggers" c) hormonal fluctuations. If I think of anything else? I will pop in later...but wanted to congratulate you on your determination, and you've my admiration as well. Pulling for you over here! You WILL make it!
inot2B
Member Elite
since 09-18-2000
Posts 2272
Alabama


3 posted 02-22-2001 07:45 PM       View Profile for inot2B   Email inot2B   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for inot2B

The only thing I've learned from being depressed is to stay away from people who are still depressed. They tend to undermine every helpful thing you try to do. I think they can't stand to see people pull their self out of quicksand while they are still sinking.
Swamp了aeryie
Member
since 12-04-2000
Posts 395
fairyland....of course;)


4 posted 02-22-2001 11:57 PM       View Profile for Swamp了aeryie   Email Swamp了aeryie   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Swamp了aeryie

inot is quite right!! Stay away from depressed people while they're depressed!!Also....have you ever tried religion?Personaly my religion is a big motivating force,just a thought =]
Skyfyre
Senior Member
since 08-15-99
Posts 1966
Sitting in Michael's Lap


5 posted 02-23-2001 01:53 AM       View Profile for Skyfyre   Email Skyfyre   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Skyfyre

Whenever I feel a Unibomber syndrome day coming on (in which I would rather kill someone than give them the time of day LOL), I read. Lots. Been known to finish two (fat)novels in one day, but when I'm done, it seems that the escape from reality did my "real time" psyche a world of good.

Silly, huh?

Linda
Dopey Dope
Deputy Moderator 1 Tour
Moderator
Member Laureate
since 08-30-2000
Posts 15536
San Juan, Puerto Rico


6 posted 02-23-2001 12:29 PM       View Profile for Dopey Dope   Email Dopey Dope   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Dopey Dope

Whenever I feel depressed........I play guitar.



I was born myself, raised myself, and will continue to be myself. The world will just have to adjust.

I'm in love with my shadow
I admire it daily
Bill Charles
Member Patricius
since 07-11-2000
Posts 11011
highways, & byways, for now


7 posted 02-24-2001 09:39 AM       View Profile for Bill Charles   Email Bill Charles   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Bill Charles

Kethry - wow, what a depression discussion this is. Hope that this might help.

As you know, depression is not something that you can just turn off, as it is an imbalance of chemicals in the brain. I believe the first thing one must find out is the 'thing' that has caused this feeling. Once that is determined, one can start working on it.

However, no matter if one gets away from the problem, or whatever, the depression will stay with you. I believe it will only disappear with medication, or more than likely rear it's ugly head when least expected. Counseling does help, but one must find the correct meds to take, or forget it, it will still be there.

Living a healthy life will also help, no argueing, no frustrations, no stress, and other negative things around the home. This does help immensly.

Hope that this little bit helps.

BC
warmhrt
Senior Member
since 12-18-1999
Posts 1566


8 posted 02-24-2001 10:28 AM       View Profile for warmhrt   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for warmhrt

Kethry,

It sure sounds like you're on the right track except for one thing. I know Ron won't like this...but DON'T sit inside on the net looking for support...it's better than nothing, but a genuine, "in the flesh" support group will help you immensely.

I began attending one not too long after being diagnosed in '94, and just last year, I started a chapter of my own in my area. I am trying to give back some of the wonderful support that I recieved through some tough times.

I learned more from the people in the support group than I could have from any doctor or therapist (although they are both needed), about medication, coping strategies, depression symptoms and triggers, the health system and all it's foibles, etc.

I really encourage you to give it a try (I have teens through late middle-age attending)and hope it does some good. I sincerely can sympathize...*Hugs*

Kris

"It is wisdom to know others;
It is enlightenment to know one's self" - Lao Tzu


[This message has been edited by warmhrt (edited 02-24-2001).]
doreen peri
Member Rara Avis
since 05-25-99
Posts 8028
Virginia


9 posted 02-24-2001 12:51 PM       View Profile for doreen peri   Email doreen peri   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for doreen peri

i've found that one of the biggest factors which contributes to depression is being overwhelmed. Physical activity always helps, especially walking outside. But also, it's very important to get a grasp on what you can control and what you can't. Writing it down helps. When you are overwhelmed with various issues in life, sometimes depression can take over because you desire to resolve all the issues all at once and it's so overwhelming, that you end up doing nothing, instead of dealing with individual issues one at a time. Some things, though, cannot be controlled at all, and those should be eliminated from your list of things you need to deal with. By writing down all the issues you are confronting, and immediately putting those which apply in a column of "This Issue is Out of my Hands- I Cannot Control This", then tackling each of the others that can be controlled, one at a time, you begin to gain strength from your accomplishments. Make sure to add exercise and walking to your list of things you can control that can be done every day. It really does help. I have never heard this said before, that depression can be a result of being overwhelmed, and so I don't know how the psychiatric community would look at it, but it's something I've discovered in my own life and making the list of "can control" and "cannot control", then breaking down the "can control" list into a plan to get things accomplished, has always helped me personally.

hope this helps.... even if in some small way

.... i truly believe that the medications available only work for the "clinically" depressed who have some kind of chemical imbalance. Diet works better for the onset of depression which isn't a chemical imbalance but instead a result of normal stresses in life. I suggest a lot of fresh fruit and fresh vegetables, especially if you are able to eat the veggies without cooking them. Asparagus is good. Spinach salads. Lots of tossed salads with a variety of fresh produce. And grains. Cereals are good. Brown rice is also good and peanut butter for the protein. I would eliminate all red meats and stick with chicken or fish, if you must have meat, preferably chicken breast.

*sigh*.... that's all for now... if i think of anything else, i'll come back to this thread.... and yes, the writing and the journal is a very good idea....

good luck to you..... now get up from that machine and go take a long brisk walk, ok?
Bill Charles
Member Patricius
since 07-11-2000
Posts 11011
highways, & byways, for now


10 posted 02-24-2001 01:57 PM       View Profile for Bill Charles   Email Bill Charles   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Bill Charles

this is for dorene peri,

I don't want to get into a contest about depression, but I would really like to know about this other type of depression you talk about. Are you saying that there are other kinds of depression, like from an improper diet? I hate to go out on a limb, but I think not. When a person becomes depressed there is a chemical in the brain that depletes itself, and feeds on itself, as the person becomes more and more depressed. And yes, medication is needed.

I would really like you to continue with your type of depression, such as from stress, and then a better diet to cure it. Depression is depression, and it's from the imbalance, not from a diet. You must be mixing up depression with something else.

BC

Ron
Administrator
Member Rara Avis
since 05-19-99
Posts 9708
Michigan, US


11 posted 02-24-2001 02:05 PM       View Profile for Ron   Email Ron   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit Ron's Home Page   View IP for Ron

quote:
I know Ron won't like this...but DON'T sit inside on the net looking for support..


Kris, why do you think I try so very hard to discourage these discussions? There is a fine line between support and dependencies, and I don't think that line can even be seen on the Internet, let alone avoided. REAL help will never be found by looking for shortcuts, and I hope you never find me advocating otherwise.
doreen peri
Member Rara Avis
since 05-25-99
Posts 8028
Virginia


12 posted 02-24-2001 02:14 PM       View Profile for doreen peri   Email doreen peri   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for doreen peri

Yes, Bill, there are 2 types of depression that I am aware of. One is a "clinical" depression caused by chemical imbalance and considered hereditary. This type of depression is often treated with anti-depressants which correct the chemical imbalance.

The other type of depression stems from normal every day stresses for those who do not have a chemical imbalance. When a family member dies, for instance, it's "normal" to become depressed for a time during the grieving process. There is no chemical imbalance. There is lethargy and crying and other symptoms such as sleep pattern changes, etc. which are associated with depression and are similar to those experienced by the person who is "clinically" depressed as described above. If a person loses a job, goes through a divorce, has extraordinary financial problems, etc., they can experience depression in reaction to these experiences, but unless they are diagnosed as "clinically" depressed, i don't think the chemical perscriptions help much. That's not just my opinion; psychiatrists often refuse to perscribe medication to those who are grieving and who are not considered "clinically depressed" due to a chemical imbalance.

The person who experiences long lived depressive states which come and go but not as a reaction to any particular change or major stress like a death of a family member, etc., may very likely have a chemical imbalance and be diagnosed as clinically depressed.

how do i know this? well, my mother is manic depressive and i have studied this for years in order to be educated enough to seek appropriate treatment for her.

I'm no psychologist or anything, but I have done my homework. Thanks for asking!

And yes, diet can help both types of depressions.

I just now saw Ron's response and I echo that gathering opinions from people on the internet should NEVER replace professional help!!!!! Doing so could be very dangerous!!

[This message has been edited by doreen peri (edited 02-24-2001).]
Ron
Administrator
Member Rara Avis
since 05-19-99
Posts 9708
Michigan, US


13 posted 02-24-2001 03:37 PM       View Profile for Ron   Email Ron   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit Ron's Home Page   View IP for Ron

Sorry to disagree, Doreen, but I believe all depressions is the result of chemical imbalances. In fact, carrying that a step farther, all emotions are the result of chemical imbalances. What you are describing, the difference between clinical depressions and normal (sic) depression, is really a difference in the feedback loop that makes life such an amazing mechanism.

By way of comparison, when you eat a piece of cake, your body releases enough insulin to maintain a healthy blood sugar. Eat more cake and you get more insulin. Stop eating for a few hours, you get less. It's an almost perfect feedback loop, with your body doing whatever is necessary to maintain an equilibrium. Regardless of what you do, your body will compensate. People with diabetes don't lack insulin so much they have a faulty feedback loop. So, they have to constantly monitor their own blood sugar levels and take insulin to maintain the necessary equilibrium.

Depression is much the same. External events, like those you mentioned, can trigger an imbalance, i.e., depression - but our feedback loops help to insure it won't last too long. Just as some people can get a quick sugar high, others can become easily depressed. In both cases, a healthy body compensates and the condition is mitigated before it can hurt us. However, in a clinically depressed person, just as with a diabetic, the body is unable to compensate with counter-chemicals. And that's when the situation becomes a true problem.

A diabetic knows insulin will not "cure" their condition, but rather gives them a semblance of normality. Can a diabetic be helped by attitude, diet, and exercise? Absolutely. Will it cure the diabetes? Probably not. And, sadly,  most will still have to monitor their blood sugar and take insulin the rest of their lives. Clinical depressions follows almost exactly the same course - except, unfortunately, we don't have a reliable "blood sugar test," nor an "insulin" that works the same for everyone.

warmhrt
Senior Member
since 12-18-1999
Posts 1566


14 posted 02-24-2001 11:08 PM       View Profile for warmhrt   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for warmhrt

Ron,

I am very sorry...didn't mean to offend. I was being facetious, and it wasn't the place for it...I sincerely apologize...OK?

Doreen,

There are different types of depression. One caused from external events coupled with a resulting chemical imbalance is called "reactive" depression. It can become recurrant and clinical if not treated properly with medication.

Kris

"It is wisdom to know others;
It is enlightenment to know one's self" - Lao Tzu
serenity blaze
Member Empyrean
since 02-02-2000
Posts 28839


15 posted 02-24-2001 11:36 PM       View Profile for serenity blaze   Email serenity blaze   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for serenity blaze

Keth? I started out being treated for chemical dependancy. Which soon translated into "depression." and of course I was depressed...I played follow the bouncing ball with my own emotions. But? Just to clear the record? My final diagnosis was not addiction, or depression but? "post traumatic stress disorder" coupled with a "lack of coping skills"....so? I spoke too soon. It just FELT like depression to me.

and? OF course I felt depressed, I was literally consuming depressants by the gallon,and inhaling them. So yes, I would call that chemically imbalanced. But it WAS my own doing.

again, I cannot stress enough, the importance of having medical guidance to see you through, and counseling for emotional support. It's a very personal path you're on...and no one---NO ONE--however much we all relate, can walk that path for you.

And Keth? You have fortitude and courage, and I have faith in you. You can and WILL overcome. Many HUGS.

So hugs to you. I admire your bravery, and pray for happiness for you.

came back to edit, just for a special thank you, to a special man---thank you Dr. Denton. You somehow made it FUN.... with eternal gratitude, smiling serenity (see? look at me! I'm WRITING...LOL)

[This message has been edited by serenity (edited 02-24-2001).]
Bill Charles
Member Patricius
since 07-11-2000
Posts 11011
highways, & byways, for now


16 posted 02-25-2001 08:12 AM       View Profile for Bill Charles   Email Bill Charles   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Bill Charles

morning doreen - I still believe that you are misinformed about depression. You state:

"Yes, Bill, there are 2 types of depression that I am aware of.

I dont think so, but I am not a Dr.

Next:

One is a "clinical" depression caused by chemical imbalance and considered hereditary. This type of depression is often treated with anti-depressants which correct the chemical imbalance."

I do agree with you on this, but I'm not sure about all of it being hereditary, but I will look it up.

You also state:

"The other type of depression stems from normal every day stresses for those who do not have a chemical imbalance. When a family member dies, for instance, it's "normal" to become depressed for a time during the grieving process. There is no chemical imbalance. There is lethargy and crying and other symptoms such as sleep pattern changes, etc. which are associated with depression and are similar to those experienced by the person who is "clinically" depressed as described above."

I believe that you have this mixed up with the grieving process. This is not depression, it is grieving. Ask a doctor about what a person is going through when a family member passes away. It's grieving, not depression. It may lead into depression, if and when the chemical imbalance starts. And I never knew that becoming depressed is normal

The following is also grieving, not depression, but again, may lead to it.

"If a person loses a job, goes through a divorce, has extraordinary financial problems, etc., they can experience depression in reaction to these experiences, but unless they are diagnosed as "clinically" depressed, i don't think the chemical perscriptions help much."

Beg to differ with you on the following. A psychiatrist will prescribe medication to someone that is grieving. It would probably be an anxiety medication, and not one for clinical depression.

"That's not just my opinion; psychiatrists often refuse to perscribe medication to those who are grieving and who are not considered "clinically depressed" due to a chemical imbalance."

Yes, a person that has experienced a long history of depression may very well likely have a chemical imbalance. However, they would more than likely have mood swings, and be diagnosed as polar, or bipolar.

"The person who experiences long lived depressive states which come and go but not as a reaction to any particular change or major stress like a death of a family member, etc., may very likely have a chemical imbalance and be diagnosed as clinically depressed."

I am sorry about your mom and wish her the best. Being polar or bipolar is not any fun to go through life with. But one can, and I wish her the best.

how do i know this? well, my mother is manic depressive and i have studied this for years in order to be educated enough to seek appropriate treatment for her.

And in conclusion, I also have done my homework about this subject. Dont forget, one cant really know it, unless they have lived it.

I'm no psychologist or anything, but I have done my homework. Thanks for asking!

Doreen, please explain how this diet can help depression, and the other one that you seem to believe exists.

And yes, diet can help both types of depressions.

BC
warmhrt
Senior Member
since 12-18-1999
Posts 1566


17 posted 02-25-2001 10:31 AM       View Profile for warmhrt   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for warmhrt

This is purely for informational purposes only...

There must be a physiological disorder occurring, i.e. chemical imbalance, for one to be diagnosed with depression. In addition, this process must be, in certain ways, adversely affecting one's ability to function in everyday life. For example, if a teen who was an honor student began getting D's or failing grades, and had lost interest in the activities he/she had always liked, that teen should be evaluated for depression.

During grief, of which there are many types, most people are adversely affected by the process, but the chemical imbalance, or the physiological disorder, is not present. It goes through the stages it usually follows, and resolves itself. After a break-up with a loved one, we grieve, but it is usually not called depression. It is a case of "the blues", and also resolves itself in most cases. It is in the instances where it continues beyond what would be considered "normal", and, perhaps even worsens in it's affect on function in life, that depression would be suspected.

To Keth...sorry for all this discussion in your thread seeking help, but I thought this info was important for others to understand. I hope you are doing well, and, again, please consider a support group...they can become like a second family, except they all know what you're going through. Hugs

Kris


"It is wisdom to know others;
It is enlightenment to know one's self" - Lao Tzu



[This message has been edited by warmhrt (edited 02-25-2001).]
Kethry will be notified of replies
 Post A Reply Post New Topic   Go to the Next Oldest/Previous Topic Return to Topic Page Go to the Next Newest Topic 
All times are ET (US) Top
  User Options
>> Discussion >> pipTalk Lounge >> What can I do to stay sane until the pil Format for Better Printing EMail to a Friend Not Available
Print Send ECard

 

pipTalk Home Page | Main Poetry Forums

How to Join | Member's Area / Help | Private Library | Search | Contact Us | Today's Topics | Login
Discussion | Tech Talk | Archives | Sanctuary



© Passions in Poetry and netpoets.com 1998-2013
All Poetry and Prose is copyrighted by the individual authors