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Passions in Poetry

Statius' Thebaid

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Essorant
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25 posted 09-23-2008 02:02 AM       View Profile for Essorant   Email Essorant   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit Essorant's Home Page   View IP for Essorant



And then by Jove's command and call
A moot was made in heaven's hall,
The chosen gods anon to meet
Within the inner pole's retreat:
From whence all things in spaces e'en
Abodes of east and west are seen,
And field and flood spread out each way
Beneath the wholeness of the day.
Then he came in right heav'nly tall
With stillmood face, but stirring all,
And sat within his starry throne.
The heavendwellers not anon
Sat down until the sire's command
By token of his tranquil hand.
Soon wand'ring semigods in crowds
And streams akin to highest clouds,
And winds with voices hushed in fear
Filled the gold halls and came to hear.
Mixed arches of the gods are seen
Atrembling with majestic sheen,
Columns more radiant ne'er to wane
And flow'ring  posts with light arcane.
When after bidden quiethood
And th' awing orb in stillness stood,
Then Jove aloft no more delayed
But now such sacred words conveyed
As have a grave and changeless weight
And voice full followed by each fate:
"Now I complain the wrongs of lands,
The mortal mind and how it stands
Unquenchable, to say in sum,
Not yet by Furies overcome.
Shall I draw out forever then
In penalties for nocent men?
I tire of sending forth my ire
With coruscating levinfire.
The Cyclops' arms, in busy pain,
Long now fatigued grow weak and wane,
And at Aeolian anvils now
The weakened blazes downward bow.
E'en I had borne to run at wide
The steeds freed from their wrongful guide
Heav'n with wand'ring wheels combust
And earth to foul with Phaeton's dust.  
But naught was gained, nor gained by thee,
My brother, when thou madest the sea
Widely with mighty spear in hand
To thring upon forbidden land,
In vain, an overwhelming flood.
Though I am auctor of their blood,
Now I descend to do as due
In punishing these houses two:
This branch from Persean Argos torn,
That from Aonian Thebes upborn.
A mind imposed remains in all:
Who may by Cadmus not recall
The slaughter, nor of Furies tell
The strife, stirred from the depths of hell,
The mother in her ill delights,
And in the woods her savage flights,
And silent judgements of each god?
Scarce light, scarce night is breadth so broad
That I may numerate therein
The impious manners of the kin.
This impious heir in appetite,
This Oedipus, against all right,
In his own father's bed and room,
Sought incest at his mother's womb,
Monster! Returned to his own source
Where his own life began its course.
Howe'er, he gave us lasting pay,
When he cast out his light of day,
Nor on our ether further feeds.
But his own sons, look at their deeds,
Full cruelly were there to meet
His falling eyes with trampling feet.
Now, now old man, thy pray'rs are good
And worthy stands thy blindlihood,
Worthy enough to hope for me,
Jove, to avenger, now for thee.
New arms I think, intend new pains,
To throw upon the guilty reigns,
The total race, the rotten fruit,
To exstirpate right from the root.
My seeds of war this manner draw
Adrastus as a sire-in-law,
And nuptials sinister to dight.
This other too shall win its wite:
For from my bosomthoughts arcane
The memories nor leave nor wane
Of trueless Tantalus, not least,
And th' outrage of the cruel feast."
 
chopsticks
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26 posted 09-23-2008 10:16 AM       View Profile for chopsticks   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for chopsticks

“The strife, stirred from the depths of hell,”

Essorant , this is my favorite line so far. It probably wasn’t a cliché when the epic was written.

I’m thinking about translating this translation to the modern speech .

The first four lines would go something like this :

“The chosen gods are soon to meet.
Jeff’s on the pole so take a seat.
START YOUR ENGINES that is the call
and it rings out in heaven’s hall”

[This message has been edited by chopsticks (09-23-2008 11:57 AM).]

Essorant
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27 posted 09-24-2008 02:39 PM       View Profile for Essorant   Email Essorant   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit Essorant's Home Page   View IP for Essorant

Chops,

Why would a line with a cliche be your favourite? Or are you japing?
Essorant
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28 posted 09-29-2008 09:40 PM       View Profile for Essorant   Email Essorant   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit Essorant's Home Page   View IP for Essorant



Th'allmighty father thus was heard.
But Juno wounded with each word
And smitten with a sudden smart,
Feeding it in her fiery heart,
To speak her part anon upsprings
And throws her thoughts about these things:
"Me, O most just of gods, therefore,
Biddest thou me to wage in war?
Thou knowst that e'er Cyclopean towers
With men and means my aid empowers
Those and the scepters far of fame
Of great Phoroneus's name.
The Pharian heifer's guard, howe'er,
With sleep and death thou wrongedest there.
And coloured in an aureus hue
Thou gost in wellwalled towers too.
I pardon counterfeit affairs,
But hate that city, hark my cares,
To which thou gost confessed of face
With tokens of our loveships' grace
Aleading thunder through the heaven
And also turnest mine own levin.
For wrongs, let Thebes atonement do.
Why makest Argos foe thereto?
But come, if such a quarr'l consume
Our inmost and our sacred room,
Exscind, erase, with weapons bold
Both Samos and Mycenae old
And level Sparta to the ground.
Why anywhere in lands yet found
Or here or there with festive blood
Has th'altar of thy consort stood?
Why warmly, radiantly increased
With gathered fragrance of the east?
Better the votive fumes upflow
From Mareotic Coptos' stow
And brazen-sonant Nile aloud
With flowings of a mournful crowd.
If mankin must abuy full sore
The fern misdeeds of men before,
And this belated sentiment
Within thy mood is fully meant,
To judge the generations ere,
What is enough, in time and care,
Far back the lands to void of rages
And finally emend the ages?
Gin then from grounds that whencewards from
O'ergliding far and wide is come
Alpheus with wandering wave to shove
Foll'wing the fleeing of his love.
Arcadians here on curseful land
Made unto thee a temple stand,
Yet not a shame? there overmore
Oenomaus' axletree of war
And steeds 'neath Getic Haemus stall
Stabled more worthy each and all.
Still, cut from suiters' remnants there,
Unburied faces stiffly stare.
Thy temple here stands gracefully,
But nocent Ida pleases thee
And Crete with lies upon her breath
Proclaiming falsely thine own death.
Wherefore should any envy stand
That I stand by Tantalean land?
Ward off the battlestrife and din
And have mildheartness on thy kin!
To thee are kingdoms many one
Impiously seen beneath the sun
That better might with patience stir
And nocent sons-in-law endure."


mankin: the kin or race of man
axletree of war: The Latin phrase is actually Mavortius axis, Mavortius being from Mavors, another spelling of Mars, the god of war.  This is basically an indirect way of saying "wagon" or "chariot" of war.  I was considering "Martian car" but changed my mind            
fern: ancient
gin: begin
Thy temple here...: "here" referring to Argos now.
Tantalean: of Tantalus (whence the word tantalize)

[This message has been edited by Essorant (09-30-2008 01:15 PM).]

Essorant
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29 posted 10-02-2008 02:38 AM       View Profile for Essorant   Email Essorant   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit Essorant's Home Page   View IP for Essorant




Juno had made an end by there,
Comingling both reproach and pray'r.
But Jove replied with words not grave,
Though stern was th'import that he gave:
"Indeed, I did not think to find
In thee consent nor favouring mind,
By what toward thine Argos be,
Though right my judgement and decree.
Had they the means, Dion indeed,
And Bacchus much for Thebes would plead,
But reverence for my mightidom
Forbids, and holds them back therefrom.
For by horrendous tides below
My brother's Stygian streams' dark flow
I swear an oath, forever wary,
That from these words I shall not vary.
So tarry not, with wings away,
Outrun the winds that thee convey,
Cyllenian son! through liquid air,
Unto thine uncle's shady lair,
And landed there this saying say:
Now to the upper airs and day,
Let senior Laius fare anon,
Whose deathblow came from his own son,
That, not Lethe's further banks shall get
By Erebus's law as yet,
To bear my mandments and commit
Unto his dreadful grandson's wit:
His brother now an exile made
Grown hardy with Argolic aid,
To keep at distance from his hall,
And as he wish deny him all
Full impiously the rightful gain
And altern honour of the reign.
Hence anger's causes come indeed,
And all the rest as I shall lead"

Atlantiades thither stirred
Most buxom to his father's word
Now in all haste his sandals brings
And binds them ready with their wings,
His hair he covers after that
And tempers tungles with his hat.
Then in his dexter took his wand
With which to break sweet slumber's bond
Or suade its sway againwards back,
With which to reach Tartarus black
And wonted to reanimate
Spirits out of their bloodless state.
Downwards he leapt and tingling there
Was taken on the tenuous air.
Nor tarried he, sublime aheight
Pulling thro voids his rapid flight,
And where he went upon his wings
He marked the clouds with mighty rings.
 

Cyllenian: Mercury (based on his birthplace, Mount Cyllene)
Atlantiades: Mercury again (based on his mother, Maia, being the daughter of Atlas.  When endings are added to the name Atlas the form Atlant- is used as in Atlantic.  The ending -des in Atlantiades is patronymic meaning "son of, descended from". )  
tungle: star
dexter: right hand
 

[This message has been edited by Essorant (10-02-2008 03:38 AM).]

Essorant
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30 posted 10-09-2008 10:34 PM       View Profile for Essorant   Email Essorant   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit Essorant's Home Page   View IP for Essorant



Now Oedipodionides,
Meanwhile, from native boundaries
Exiled and stealthy slank abroad
And o'er Aonia's wastelands trod.
Full sorely now he thinks all through,
The kingdom owed to him and due,
And the long year complains and pines
As heaven stands with tarried signs.
In mind o'errolled and overrun
By day and night his care is one:
If ever he shall see brought down
His brother nethered from the crown
And hold the honour and delight
To rule o'er Thebes with all his might.
An age would give as pledge and pay
To see the light of such a day.
He moans the time is idle spent,
But soon again is hotly hent
By princely pride and inspiration
And catches an imagination
That now, his brother down and doffed
He nims the throne and sits aloft.
Such anxious hope his mind employs
And longsome pray'rs consume his joys.
Away he purposes to bow
Toward Inachian cities now,
And by the Danaan acres go,
And swart Mycenae's sun-reft stow,
And bear his road with fearless pride,
Whether Erinys fore him guide
Or Force of way as may befall,
Or Atropos unbending call.
He leaves th' Ogygian lands and bounds
Of howlful airs and furious sounds,
And hills that reek with dewy rud
Thickened and drenched from Bacchic blood.
Thence where Cithaeron softly hields
Sitting stretched out toward the fields
And leans its weary mount at last
Towards the wave, his pace is past.
Hence clomben pathways scopulose
Sciron's infamous cliffs set close,
Eke Scylla's fields and rural stead
Under the purple leader led,
And also Corinth mild and kind,
Well on his way, he leaves behind,
And hears the rivages both twain
Double with sound amidst the plain.

And now, for Phoebus' work was ended,
Titanis being soon ascended
With dewy wain, o'er earth now still,
Thins out the air and casts a chill.
Now beasts and flyers take to rest,
Now Sleep creeps in each greedy breast,
Referring sweet oblivion's air
Unto this laborate life of care.
No welkins punic to the sight
Promised the come again of light,
Nor twilight long with shortened shade
With Phoebus mirrored back was made:
More dense by lands the night o'er rolls,
Reached by no ray and veils the poles.
Now stern Aeolus' cloisters sound,
Those walls that keep the winds fast bound,
And stricken threat with voices hoarse
The coming of a stormy course.
The roaring winds each other swinge,
And force the axis from its hinge,
While every for himself will fight
Gripping the sky in greedy flight.
But Auster augments most the night
Rolling black volumes through the height
And pours down showers fierce and fell
That bitter Boreas hardens well
Presolidating with cold air
Soon frorn to hailstones here and there.
Nor is there not outbroken levin
With trembling glister through the heaven,
And ether gnidden with its ire
Asundered forth with sudden fire.
Now Nemea waxes water-swenched
And now Arcadia's peaks are drenched
Conterm'nous with Taenarum's woods.
Inachus flows with mighty floods
And eke Erasinus at once
With frorey waves arising runs.
Whilom full dusty trodden grounds
Now streams stretch out and leave their bounds.
Lerna with flood spumes from below
With ancient venom in her flow.
Each grove is torn, old branches cast,
To-rent and stolen by the blast.
And by no suns beholden ere
So thick, so umbrose everywhere
Lycaeus' shrouded summerstead
Lies open now and nakeded.
But he amazed and having wondered
At fugient rocks from ridges sundered
And frightful hearing cloudborn rills
Outthringing from the heighty hills
And pastor's house and cattle's sty
Reft by the whirlwind raging by,
Not out of wit nor with delay,
Albe uncertain of the way,
With silence through the dusky airs
Draws his vast course and further fares.
And everywhence and everywhence
Fear of his brother frets his sense.
So as a sailor sorrowly
Caught on the waves of wintry sea
To whom wards neither Wagon slow
Nor Luna with her friendly glow,
Beshining them with reaching rays
Leads out and luminates the ways,
In middle tumult there he be
In wanhope twixt the sky and sea
And either now from deadly rock
Submerged in waves, awaits the shock
Or sharp and foamy cliffedge now
Be run into his hoven prow,
So had the Cadmean hero hied
Through forestshadows thick and wide,
With his vast shield, with steps increased,
Dared through the stalls of many beast
And further with a forward breast
Broke through the shrubs and bravely pressed.
Fear's grievious force befalls his heart
And smiting gives a goading smart,
Til from Inachian homes in sight
With conquored darkness came a light
The which Larissean heights let go
Pouring on walls devex below.
Inspired with hope he thither hies,
Hence on his left a temple lies:
High Prosymna's Junonian fane,
Rightwards, signed with Herculean stain
Lernaean water blackly flows,
And in the opened gate he goes.
And finally beholding there
The vestibules most roy'l and fair
Soon having weary limbs outthrown
Stiffened by storm, berained, and blown,
Against th'uncouth halldoors prest,
Invites thin sleep to a rough rest.

 


Oedipodionides: Oedipus' son (here Polynices)
Titanis: the moon
Punic: Purple
Auster: the south wind
Boreas: the north wind
Wagon:  Charles' Wain or the Big Dipper

[This message has been edited by Essorant (10-11-2008 02:42 AM).]

chopsticks
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31 posted 10-10-2008 09:51 AM       View Profile for chopsticks   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for chopsticks

“ Why would a line with a cliché be your favorite?”

Only time will tell.

I do like the modern cliché better: “The trouble, from the hub’s of hell”

"I'll see you in the hub's of hell"

"It's hotter than the hub's of hell "

Essorant
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32 posted 10-10-2008 01:35 PM       View Profile for Essorant   Email Essorant   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit Essorant's Home Page   View IP for Essorant

Never heard it before.  What a lewd misuse of the apostrophe.  

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33 posted 10-10-2008 03:21 PM       View Profile for chopsticks   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for chopsticks


“What a lewd misuse of the apostrophe “

Do you really mean that ? Are we talking about the same lewd.? Only yesterday I have lunch with him and he didn’t mention you..
Essorant
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34 posted 10-12-2008 01:27 AM       View Profile for Essorant   Email Essorant   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit Essorant's Home Page   View IP for Essorant

I might not see what you are talking about, Chops.  Anyway, here is a furthering I wished to put on the end of my earlier post, but ran out of time to do so.
 

There, King Adrastus, not with strife,
Mid in the limit of his life,
Verging to senium in his eld,
Gubernance o'er the people held,
Rich in his kin and raught his line
On either side to Jove divine.
Though lacking of the better sex,
Females were flowering to the rex:
Two daughters' pledge of love, indeed,
Gave him supportance in his need.
Phoebus to him a ferly told
Deadly, and soon to truth unrolled,
By fatal guidance forth to draw,
Each to be loved as son-in-law,
That both a bristlebearing boar
And fulvous lion stood in store!
Revolving this amidst his mind,
The sire might not the sooth unwind
And Amphiaraus thou mightst not
Unlock the lore, unknit the knot,
That art of future things well wise
While th'auctor Phoebus such denies.
But in his heart, set like a curse,
The parent's care grows worse and worse.
 

senium: old age
eld: age
gubernance: governance (gub- is the original spelling)
raught: reached
rex: king
ferly: something that causes fear and wonder
auctor: author (auct- is the original spelling still in the word auction)
 

[This message has been edited by Essorant (10-12-2008 02:10 AM).]

chopsticks
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35 posted 10-12-2008 11:53 AM       View Profile for chopsticks   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for chopsticks

“What a lewd misuse of the apostrophe “

Essorant , what I mean is that we don’t both have the same understanding of the word “ lewd .” That is ok, because what you think of how I use an apostrophe, is none of my business .  So please get on with your translations,  I enjoy them very much..

Essorant
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36 posted 10-12-2008 01:43 PM       View Profile for Essorant   Email Essorant   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit Essorant's Home Page   View IP for Essorant

Chops,

Methinks that is because you are not looking beyond the deviant modern usage.  The root meaning of the word lewd is simply "unlearned" or "ignorant" as of clergy, school, letters, grammar, etc.  Take a look at how it is used in the Middle English poem, Speculum Vitae:


"In English tonge I schal yow telle,
Yif ye wyth me so longe wil dwelle.
No Latyn wil I speke no waste,
But English, žat men vse mast,
Žat can eche man vnderstande,
Žat is born in Ingelande;
For žat langage is most chewyd,
Os wel among lered os lewyd.
Latyn, as (hs. al) I trowe, can nane
But žo, žat haueth it in scole tane,
And somme can Frensche and no Latyn,
Žat vsed han cowrt and dwellen žerein;
And somme can of Latyn a party,
Žat can of Frensche but febly;
And somme vnderstonde wel Englysch,
Žat can nožer Latyn nor Frankys.
Bože lered and lewed, olde and yonge,
Alle vnderstonden english tonge;
Žer fore I holde most syker žan,
We (hs. Wo) schewe žat langage žat eche man can,
And al for lewed men namely,
Žat can no maner clergy.
To teche hem it were most nede,
For clerkes can bože se and rede
In diuerse bokes of holy wryt,
How žei schal lyue, and žei loke it.
Žere fore I wil me holly halde
To žat langage, žat Englisch is calde.
Gode men, vnderstondes now:
Že ryght wai I schal teche yow,
Žat ye may holde, whil ye leue,
And swyche a lessoun I schal yow yeue,
Žat myrour of lyf to yow may be,
In že whiche ye may al yowre lyf se."

 

chopsticks
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37 posted 10-13-2008 08:23 AM       View Profile for chopsticks   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for chopsticks

“ Methinks that is because you are not looking beyond the deviant modern usage . “

Essorant, you are so right and I try to avoid doctors that practices blood letting .

[This message has been edited by chopsticks (10-13-2008 09:03 AM).]

Essorant
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38 posted 10-13-2008 01:44 PM       View Profile for Essorant   Email Essorant   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit Essorant's Home Page   View IP for Essorant

How does bloodletting have likeness to using the more original and etymologically proper meaning(s) of a word?  

I don't have a problem with words devoloping some different modern meanings or connotations, but rather when people enforce those and no longer let the original meanings have a place in the language anymore.  

One of the worst examples is the word thew.  Throughout English (and also in related Germanic languages) until modern times meant "manner, custom, virtue"  The word, hardly ever used in modern English, nevertheless was misused somehow, to mean something toward "physical strength".  Now all the sudden dictionaries list it only according to that deviant meaning and don't even list the original and more proper meaning, such as the listing at dictionary.com:

Thew

1. Usually, thews. muscle or sinew.  
2. thews, physical strength.  

[Origin: bef. 900: ME: OE théaw custom, usage: c. OHG thau (later dau) discipline: akin to L tuérī to watch]

However, at least dictionary.com still lists the original meanings of the word lewd:

Lewd\ (l[=u]d), a. [Compar. Lewder (-[~e]r); superl. Lewdest.] [OE. lewed, lewd, lay, ignorant, vile, AS. l[=ae]wed laical, belonging to the laity.]

1. Not clerical; laic; laical; hence, unlearned; simple. [Obs.]

For if a priest be foul, on whom we trust, No wonder is a lewed man to rust. --Chaucer.

So these great clerks their little wisdom show To mock the lewd, as learn'd in this as they. --Sir. J. Davies.

chopsticks
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39 posted 10-13-2008 05:17 PM       View Profile for chopsticks   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for chopsticks

That was just my way of saying they both are relating to an earlier time and I’m not  interested in either; but those who do are fine with me.

Essorant, when you said, “What a lewd misuse of the apostrophe “ was I suppose to understand the comment in the present day meaning or say, that is old Ess and he is using the archaic meaning of the word  lewd. So he is really saying “ What a ignorant  misuse of the apostrophe “

Ess,  you are a wordsmith and I may be ignorant of the possessive use of the  apostrophe . Ignorance can be cured, but something’s are forever. Did I get it right this time ?

Are we having fun yet ?
  

[This message has been edited by chopsticks (10-14-2008 07:18 AM).]

Essorant
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40 posted 10-26-2008 12:35 AM       View Profile for Essorant   Email Essorant   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit Essorant's Home Page   View IP for Essorant

No point in discussing it further, Chops.  It is not about knowing automatically what a word means, but actually being willing to learn it and learn also beyond just the oft-deviated modern usage.  But if one is not interested, one is not interested.  

Essorant
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41 posted 10-26-2008 12:38 AM       View Profile for Essorant   Email Essorant   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit Essorant's Home Page   View IP for Essorant

How Tydeus on that night selfsame
Likewise through stormy weather came
And found the shelter furthermore
That Polynices found before.
Beneath one roof to lodge them both
The heroes in their hearts were loth.
After few words and threats outright
They had a sore and bitter fight.
_______________________



But lo! relinquishing anon
By fatal cause, old Calydon,
For brotherblood, for horror steers,
And drives him forth with guilty fears,
Th'Olenian one, that Tydeus hight,
Beneath the sleepy depth of night
Treading upon a selfsame path
Through selfsame winds' and showers' wrath
With rime upon his ridge to bear,
Berained by storm his face and hair,
In the ilk shelter now ingoes
Wherein the other held repose,
That earlier comer come before
That stretched out on the frigid floor.
Then here by fortune it became
Grippen were both with bloody grame:
Not tholing other either wight
Neath fellowed rooves to fend off night.
Now alternating words they say
And with their threats a while delay,
Until their sermons well were thrown
And ire thereof enough was known,
Soon shoulders bare, and now upright,
They dare there have a naked fight.
Now Polynices steps more steep
Longer his limbs not low to creep,
And in his eld, as it appears,
Tender and integer of years.
But Tydeus nothing less to find
Well bears himself with might and mind
And through his limbs and body small
A greater virtue reigns o'er all.
Now thickened blows they thicken more
On faces and on temples sore,
Like Riphaean hailstones, or as darts,
And kneeling knock the nether parts.
Not otherwise, as years shall run,
To Pisaean Jove the thund'ring one
The festive lustrum comes again,
Where dust grows hot with sweat of men:
Hence is the gathering's uproar heard,
Whereby the younglings well are stirred,
And mothers, though excluded there,
Expect the prize they wish to bear.
In likewise both hot hate conveys
Inflamed to fight, but not for praise.
Fingerteeth deeply scrutinize
Peircing the face and turning eyes.  
Perhaps, for ire, such was it led,
Soon both their swords had nakeded,
Girt at their sides, and better too
By hostile arms to be run through
And by your brother mourned, in truth,
Hadst thou then lain, O Theban youth,
If not the king in muchel wonder
At wontless clamour up and under
From heavy breasts each strident groan,
Through darkness, steered his steps anon,
In whom the sober oldhood prest
In such deteriorated rest.
Whenas he went, straight as a line,
With numerous torches shedding shine,
Having done off the locks as then,
On the front threshold, sees the men,
A sorry sight to say, a dread,
Faces totorn and cheeks bebled:
"What is the cause of such a rage
Ye foreign comers young of age?
No citizen of mine would dare
Such harshness at his hands to bear.
Whence this implacable delight
By which the tranquil still of night
Ye break with harsh resounding hate?
Is day too small, and it such grief
To suffer but a while's relief
Of peace and sleep in mind to come?
But tell, whence are ye sprungen from
Witherwards do ye bear your way,
And what your quarrel be, do say.
Not low nor humble may ye be
Such anger shows that openly,
For e'en through bloodshed, clarified
Great signs bespeak a race of pride."
 

chopsticks
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42 posted 10-27-2008 11:57 AM       View Profile for chopsticks   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for chopsticks

“No point in discussing it further,”

Essorant, I agree and I will not broach the subject again .

Btw, I mean~ broach ~in the modern definition, ( to open up a subject for discussion) and

not the Latin definition  (vulgar.)


Essorant
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43 posted 10-29-2008 01:07 AM       View Profile for Essorant   Email Essorant   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit Essorant's Home Page   View IP for Essorant


Well, I am glad that you know the Latin meaning.  That is an example learnedness instead of lewdness
Essorant
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44 posted 10-29-2008 02:12 AM       View Profile for Essorant   Email Essorant   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit Essorant's Home Page   View IP for Essorant



This scarce was said, when mixed with din,
With sidelong look, they both begin:
"O Argives' aldermildest king!
What need is words anent this thing?
Thou seest thyself how it is led,
Our sorry faces all bebled."
These words with all the rest confound
Lost in their voices' bitter sound.
Then Tydeus risen gan to tell
In order how this thing befell:
"Coveting comfort for my days
Some solace for my sorry case,
Leaving monstriferous Calydon
And all its wealth, I went anon,
And from the Acheloian wolds.
Lo in thy bounds such night enfolds
And covers me with such a gloom,
Who was this to forbid me room?
Or be it only for the claim
That he the earlier hither came?
Bimembered Centaurs share a stow,
They say, and Cyclops even so
Underneath Aetna sibsomely.
In rabid monsters one may see
E'en there internal laws are sown
And sacred justice of their own.
But not so much for us is found
To share with grith one lodging ground!
But why complain? For thou today
Glad with my spoils shalt fare away
Whoe'er thou art, or know me such,
If grief blunt not my blood too much,
Of mighty Oeneus' stirp indeed,
And traced to Mars, no rotten seed"
"Nor lack I of my kindredfolk,
Nor animus" the other spoke.
But with a mind forefeeling fates
To name his father hesitates.
Then mildheart king Adrastus quoth:
"But come desist from threats, ye both,
That night brought forth or bravery
Or wrath so unexpectedly,
And ending, leaving off this all,
Succeed into my palace hall.
Now join right hands and each take part
In equal pledges of the heart.
Not are these deeds befallen vain
Howe'er they fell betwixt you twain,
Not lacking will of gods above.
Perhaps this ire foreerrands love
That after all ye fain may find
This memory made in your mind."
Nor voiced he vainly fates to be.
They say through fight fidelity
Woke after wounds, and so great fared
As Theseus bore in danger shared
With rash Pirithous, friends ifere.
Or with Pylades standing near
Distressed Orestes turned his path
To shun Megaera's rabid wrath.
As waters foughten with a blast
Reside and settle back at last
But of those winds a lingering breath
In laxate sails prolongs its death,
Likewise the heroes hearsome yode
And undercame the king's abode.
 

[This message has been edited by Essorant (10-29-2008 02:50 AM).]

chopsticks
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45 posted 10-29-2008 08:24 AM       View Profile for chopsticks   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for chopsticks

“That is an example learnedness instead of lewdness “

Thanks Essorant, and who said Canadian's don’t have a sense of humor ?

Btw, your last offering is one of  the best .  

Essorant
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since 08-10-2002
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46 posted 10-30-2008 03:07 PM       View Profile for Essorant   Email Essorant   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit Essorant's Home Page   View IP for Essorant

Thanks Chopsticks.

Here is a site you might want to look at.    

Essorant
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since 08-10-2002
Posts 4689
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47 posted 10-31-2008 02:12 AM       View Profile for Essorant   Email Essorant   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit Essorant's Home Page   View IP for Essorant

How King Adrastus looked them o'er
And found the lion and the boar
That Phoebus with a misty clause
Foresaid should be his sons-in-laws.
_______________________
 

Here, first, he leisures to behold
The men's attire and weapons bold:
On this one's back a lion flain
Shows up with coarse and shaggy mane,
Like that in species and in hue
Amphitryoniades slew
In early eld and yearyoung days,
In the Teumasian forestspace,
Before he fought the monstercat
Of Cleonae, did on him that.
On Tydeus dreadful plunder sate
Labouring o'er his shoulders great,
Bristles and backbent tooth thereon,
An honour come of Calydon.
The old man dizzies with surprise
At such an omen in his eyes,
Recalling Phoebus well in mind
The oracle, the thing divined,
And uttered warning that he gave
Delivered through his voiceful cave.
His face is frorn in sight thereof,
His limbs throughthrilled with awe enough.
He sensed that by an urge divine
The twain were led, and this the sign,
That augur Phoebus' misty saws
Foresaid to be his sons-in-laws,
In words misleading and unclear
Under the tokens of wild deer.
So thence, toward the starry skies
His arms outstretch and words arise:
"Lo Night!  whose fathom overfolds
Labors of welkins and of wolds
Transmitting through expanses far
The lapse of every fiery star,
Indulgent to repair the mind,
Til next, to wankle wights of Kind,
Titan with sheen, with nimble rise
Beshines them and their earthy sties.
To me in perplex errors cast
Kind one, thou sendest sooth at last
And weavings out of ancient fate
Openly showst to extricate:
Further my work and hear my vow
And certify thine omens now.
Through all the measures of the year
This house shall e'er thyself revere.
To thee black flocks, picked for their necks,
O Diva, shall be thy respects,
And Vulcan's fires be eating through
The lustral tharms, milkdrenched anew.
Hail to the tripods' truth of old!
Hail to dark caves where it is told!
O Fortune! wilt thou see this now,
I understand the gods, somehow!"
The old man having spoken then
Conjoining hands with both the men
Leading them thus within his walls,
Proceeded to the inner halls.


saws: sayings
deer: animals (the original meaning of the word).  
perplex: tangled, intricate
tharms: entrails

[This message has been edited by Essorant (10-31-2008 04:08 PM).]

chopsticks
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Posts 870
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48 posted 10-31-2008 10:39 AM       View Profile for chopsticks   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for chopsticks

“ Here is a site you might want to look at. “

Thanks Essorant, boy, did I learn something~(one was never use an apostrophe  to show

plural’s)

Essorant
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since 08-10-2002
Posts 4689
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49 posted 10-31-2008 02:22 PM       View Profile for Essorant   Email Essorant   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit Essorant's Home Page   View IP for Essorant

Being difficult, Chopstick's?
 
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