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Passions in Poetry

Those Smelly Feet!

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Balladeer
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0 posted 05-04-2008 12:18 AM       View Profile for Balladeer   Email Balladeer   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit Balladeer's Home Page   View IP for Balladeer

When you WANT all the WORDS to just FLOW like the SEA
and you DON'T know the METH-od then TAKE it from ME.
This great STYLE is the AN-swer to MAKE it come TRUE,
just two SHORTS and one LONG is the THING you can DO.

WANT to MAKE it POW-er-FUL? then THIS form DOES it WELL.
START-ing OUT tro-CHA-ic IS the WAY to WEAVE this SPELL.
LEAD-ing SOUNDS that CATCH the READ-er's EYE is THIS form's KEY.
START with ONE strong SYL-a-BLE and YOU will QUICK-ly SEE.

i-AM-bic STANDS out AS the LEAD-er OF po-ET-ic VERSE.
al-THOUGH to MAST-er THIS one FORM can MAKE a PREACH-er CURSE.
short, LONG, short LONG, just TAP your FEET and YOU will DO it WELL.
you MAY be-COME a POE or ROB-ert SER-vice. WHO can TELL?

Here are the three main forms of meter in writing rhymed poetry -  anapestic, trochaic and iambic. Get your feet moving and give me a poem using one of these forms. Put your poem in a new thread and post the link to that thread here in this one. You done yet? For those of you who critique, don't give me any GREAT POEM! or WOW! THAT'S COOL!  FOllow the meter of the  poem and state any areas where the form broke down. If you don't feel it broke down anywhere just say GREAT POEM! and we will take it from there.
Alison
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1 posted 05-04-2008 12:54 AM       View Profile for Alison   Email Alison   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Alison

'Scuse me, Mr. Balladeer (most wonderful teacher and all that good stuff that people who suck up say).

I can't start a new thread on this board - I only get this message:

Sorry, but you are not authorized to post a new topic in this particular forum. Only moderators, administrators, and authorized users may post new topics in this forum.

-----

Could you maybe use your wizardly powers and fix this for me?  Maybe?

With the deepest gratitude,
Alison

Balladeer
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2 posted 05-04-2008 02:03 AM       View Profile for Balladeer   Email Balladeer   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit Balladeer's Home Page   View IP for Balladeer

Aha!I wasn't aware of that, being the new teacher here. Perhaps Marge or Munda knows, since they posted poems on this forum...

help?
chopsticks
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3 posted 05-04-2008 09:07 AM       View Profile for chopsticks   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for chopsticks

Balladeer, you are a modest man, with no reason to be so.( That is a reverse take on Mark Twain’s quote on

modesty ).

When it comes to writing, I would  not question  your knowledge about it , as I wouldn’t others on here ,

Brad and BobK, to mention a couple.

Btw, Poe and  Service are my favorites , after you of course .
Not A Poet
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4 posted 05-04-2008 10:43 AM       View Profile for Not A Poet   Email Not A Poet   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit Not A Poet's Home Page   View IP for Not A Poet

Hey Mike, Nan has to authorize new students in here. Alison you can send her an email and she will get you set up. Or Mike could probably do it too, if he knew how, that is.
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5 posted 05-04-2008 11:07 AM       View Profile for Alison   Email Alison   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Alison

Duck and Cover (It's Grandma)!


Hide the liquor!  Grandma’s coming to visit again!
It’s no wonder that old woman is fashionably thin;
Her hollow leg must run straight down from her thighs to her toes.
She carries a flask in her girdle wherever she goes.

Hide the family jewels!  Grandma will be on the next train!
She can still pick a pocket without showing great strain.
Grandma stuffs wallets deep in her alligator bag.
Her underwire bra won’t let any stolen goods sag.

Hide the checkbook!  Grandma can still copy all of our names!
If she finds it, our reputations will go straight down the drain.
Grandma rolls all her pennies (she loves to roll old men too).
What’s an old lady to do when she becomes ninety-two?

Batten the hatches; Grandma’s just now arrived at the door!
There’s our sweet blue-haired Grandma that we all simply adore.
Frisk her to make sure that there are no weapons in her hose,
Grandma’s been known to pack an arsenal wherever she goes!

We’d like to have a Grandma who bakes cookies and knits hats.
But deep down inside we know that’s not where our Grandma’s at!
She smokes cigars and cusses and she leers at young men.
There is plenty of time to grow old, she just doesn’t know when!

---

Alison
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6 posted 05-04-2008 05:01 PM       View Profile for Balladeer   Email Balladeer   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit Balladeer's Home Page   View IP for Balladeer

Thank you, chopsticks, for your kind words. I will happily follow behind Poe and Service any day!

Ok, Pete, thanks. No, I don't know how. Nan? Who's that? I got an e-mail from someone that could have been named that asking me to come in and get things going but haven't seen her since. Maybe I was dreaming?
Balladeer
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7 posted 05-04-2008 05:22 PM       View Profile for Balladeer   Email Balladeer   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit Balladeer's Home Page   View IP for Balladeer

Alison, that's a cute poem. I'm not looking for cute. For this lesson I'm looking for meter.

HIDE the LIQ-or! GRAND-ma's CO-ming to VIS-it a_GAIN!.........(13)......./-/-/-/--/--/
it's no WON-der THAT old WO-man is FASH-ion-A-bly THIN....(14).......--/-/-/--/-/-/
GRAND-ma STUFFS WAL-lets DEEP in her AL-i-GAT-or BAG..(13)......./-//-/--/-/-/
her UN-der-WIRE BRA won't LET AN-y STO-len GOODS SAG..(13).......-/-//-//-/-//

The numbers in parentheses is the syllable count. You did well in that. However, if the meter is not consistent, the syllable count loses value. At the end I break your accents down to short (-) and long (/). If you check your lines none of them hold an iambic, anapestic ot trochaic rythym throughout the line, much less the stanza. It doesn't flow. The rest of the poem is basically the same.

No one said this was easy and I'm certainly not saying it, either. It takes a lot of work to come up with proper meter. Most will throw up their hands and say heck with it. I'll just write the way I want to....and that's fine. For those who want to write excellent verse, however, it will never be achieved without proper or well-planned meter. Those are the poems people remember and consider more than cute.

Wanna try again?  
Alison
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8 posted 05-04-2008 05:54 PM       View Profile for Alison   Email Alison   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Alison

Yep, I do want to try again.  Cute is not my objective either.  I struggle with this meter stuff and getting a handle on it is my real hope by taking these lessons.

Thank you and I'll review your response again and keep giving it a shot until I get a grasp on it.

A
Munda
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9 posted 05-04-2008 06:25 PM       View Profile for Munda   Email Munda   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit Munda's Home Page   View IP for Munda

Yep, Nan is the owner of the new student magic.

Alison, I will have a look at your poem later, but trust me when I say I will surely have a hard time with this assignment. I know all about throwing my hands up and say 'heck with it', but somehow I can never resist the challenge and struggle until I get it right. (Until the teacher points out my mistakes!   )

Balladeer, I hope I am allowed a couple of days for this assignment. Beside work, homework for my course 'writing for children', a book I'm working on and a map I'm creating for it, a son who insists on a meal now and then and the occasional hour of sleep I seem to need from time to time, I will make sure to submit something before the end of the week. Yeah... I can almost hear you think... excuses, excuses...
nakdthoughts
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Between the Lines


10 posted 05-04-2008 06:27 PM       View Profile for nakdthoughts   Email nakdthoughts   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for nakdthoughts

Silent Word

The saddest sound I ever heard came from the deadened, silent word.
A look of nothingness in eyes, when words non-loving reached my sighs.
And how I gasped to breathe the air, to purify that deadened stare.
Forget not ever, shock unheard, from deadened look of silent word.

It reached into, turned inside out, the crying words, that could not shout.
Instead they numbed me, thoughts and feel,such words of hurt, that seemed unreal.
The muted, dampened, soaking tears, now left behind those youthful years,
When happiness and loving thrilled, his deadened eyes, have all but killed.

But say I, to myself in thought, a present to me, soon be brought.
For wishes, dreams I've had but few in want of making memories, new.
Released from mind soon, hurt of old, now making room for words that mold,
To treasure keep, the silent word this time of loving only, heard.

Beholding soon, your pair of eyes, blue pools that drown me into sighs.
Surrounding me in silence sweet, to coat my thoughts in warmth, complete.
With touch of gentleness, your song, will slowly turn, to right the wrong.
And in my silence, love shall reign, to shower me, in life, again.

M... a poem rearranged from 2000 once inspired by Balladeer ( not sure if it meets which feet...)p.s. I undoubled my lines so the rhyming is within  each line


"Love is not blind - It sees more and not less, but because it sees more, it is willing to see less."
(Will Moss)
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11 posted 05-04-2008 06:41 PM       View Profile for Balladeer   Email Balladeer   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit Balladeer's Home Page   View IP for Balladeer

Munda, take all the time you need. I'm not going anywhere....
Alison
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12 posted 05-04-2008 06:45 PM       View Profile for Alison   Email Alison   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Alison



Balladeer
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13 posted 05-04-2008 06:54 PM       View Profile for Balladeer   Email Balladeer   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit Balladeer's Home Page   View IP for Balladeer

Maureen, I bow to your greatness! This is a wonderful poem. It is perfect iambic, it flows throughout each line and I can find no fault with it whatsoever.

It also shows how setting up a rythym can make the reader read the way you want it done. For example...

But say I, to myself in thought, a present to me, soon be brought.

This line could be read in different ways. It could be read...

BUT SAY i to my-SELF in THOUGHT, a PRE-sent to ME, SOON be BOUGHT..//---/-/-/--//-/

This is choppy and kills the rythym of the poem completely. However, your excellent iambic to this point which has manifested itself in the reader's mind, will cause them to read..

but SAY i TO my-SELF in THOUGHT, a PRE-sent TO me, SOON be BOUGHT ...perfect iambic.

The difficulty in writing good meter is not only getting the long and short syllables in the proper place, but getting the reader to read it the way you want it read. That makes all the difference. Here you have done it in an excellent manner.

There will be no eraser cleaning for you!
Nan
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14 posted 05-04-2008 08:39 PM       View Profile for Nan   Email Nan   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit Nan's Home Page   View IP for Nan

Hey Alison

The door's opened

Shhhh - don't tell Balladeer I was here.  He might stop doing all this good work..
Alison
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15 posted 05-04-2008 11:20 PM       View Profile for Alison   Email Alison   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Alison

I'll just stay in this thread with this poem as I started it in here, but will do all others in their own post.  Thank you, Nan!

Okay, my eyes are spinning and my feet are tapping out of control.  Here's my corrected homework -- now I am off to dust erasers.  



(Whooops, I didn't mean to erase the teacher.  Honest)
----


Duck and Cover (It's Grandma)!


Hide the liquor!  Grandma’s coming back to visit again!  
It is liquor keeping Grandma fashionably thin
In her hollow legs seems like the gin flows to her toes  
Grandma stashes merlot bottles among stacks of panty hose  

Hide the family jewels!  Grandma’s riding that noon train!  
Fingers picking stranger’s pockets, sticky once again.  
Grandma pushes pilfered wallets down her canvas bag.  
Wired bras heft stolen goods from occupational drag.  

Hide the checkbook!  Grandma can still forge all our names.  
Believe it; our reputations will flow on down the drain.  
Grandma rolls her pennies (often rolling men for money too)
Recreation narrowed when Grandma became ninety-two!  

Batten all the hatches; Grandma’s arrived at the door!  
Darling little Grandma whom we so lovingly adore  
Frisk her quick to ensure that there's no weapon in her hose;
Grandma always packs an arsenal when moving on the go    

We’d love to have Grandma bake nice cookies and sew hats.    
Yet we all know that is not where Grandma’s mind is at!  
Grandma smokes on cigars and she leers at younger men.  
Telling us there’s lots of time to age - and she’ll tell us when.  


Alison


[This message has been edited by Alison (05-05-2008 12:48 AM).]

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16 posted 05-05-2008 01:31 AM       View Profile for Balladeer   Email Balladeer   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit Balladeer's Home Page   View IP for Balladeer

Hide the liquor!  Grandma’s coming back to visit again!  ..........(14)...../-/-/-/-/-/--/
It is liquor keeping Grandma fashionably thin..........................(13)...../-/-/-/-/-/-/
In her hollow legs seems like the  gin flows to her toes ...........(13)....--/-/-/-//--/
Grandma stashes merlot bottles among stacks of panty hose .(15).../-/-/-/--//-/-/

As you can see, the syllable counts are off in the first stanza. and the meter
off in three lines. In the first line "VIS-it a-GAIN" deviates from the meter. Well,
since the line has one syllable too many, that's easy to fix. We can make it
"Hide the liquor! Grandma's coming over once again!" The third line is pretty much of a mess
with respect to meter. Let's go with "Seems like gin, through hollow legs, goes right down
to her toes." Fourth line has too many syllables and "among stacks" kills meter. How
about "Grandma stashes Merlot bottles under panty hose."?


Hide the family jewels!  Grandma’s riding that noon train! ........(13) .../-/-/-/-/-/-/
Fingers pick in stranger’s pockets, sticky once again. ............(13) ../-/-/-/-/-/-/ (perfect)
Grandma pushes pilfered wallets down her canvas bag.  .........(13).../-/-/-/-/-/-/ (perfect)
Wired bras heft stolen goods from occupational sag................(13).. /-/-/-/-/-/-//

The second stanza is very good as far as the syllable counts and meter goes,
as long as I grant you that "jewels" and "wired" and "family" are two-syllable words.
I don't care for "occupational sag", which sounds clumsy and throws
the meter off but I leave that to you.


Hide the checkbook!  Grandma can still copy down our names.(13)  /-/-/-/-/-/-/
Believe it; our reputations will flow on down the drain................(14) -/--/-/--/-/-/
Grandma rolls her pennies (often rolling men for money too).....(15) /-/-/-/-/-/-/-/
Recreation narrowed when Grandma became ninety-two! ........(14) /-/-/--/--//-/

Disaster! syllable counts are all over the place which has a majot effect on the meter.
The first line is perfect and then all crashes. In the second line you begin with an iambic word (-/)
"believe", whereas, you had always led off with a trochaic one (/-). How about something
like "Holy cow! Our reputations will go down the drain". Third line has two syllables too many and
one useless two-syllable word (often) so that's easy enough to fix. To fix the fourth line, which
has a syllable too many and deviations in meter, we can change "became" to "hit". The meter
will still be off in one place but we can live with it.


Batten all the hatches; Grandma’s arrived at the door!  ............(13)  /-/-/-/--/--/
Darling little Grandma whom we lovingly so adore  ..................(14)  /-/-/-/-/-//-/
Frisk her to ensure that there are no weapons in her hose;.......(14)  /-/-/-/--/-/-/
Grandma always packs an arsenal when moving on the go ......(15) /-/-/-/-/-/-/-/

Line #1, "at the" are words that hurt the meter.  Replace "arrived" with "here now". Line #2
has one sullable too many and one useless word, "so". Easy to fix. Take it out. Line #3 has
one syllable too many and one useless word, "that". Do the same thing. Line #4, two extra
syllables and one two-syllable word too many, "always".


We’d love to have Grandma bake nice cookies and sew hats. ..(13)  -/--/-/-/--/-
Yet we all know that is not where Grandma’s mind is at! .........(13)  -/-/--/-/-/-/
Grandma smokes on cigars and she often leers at young men..(14) /-/--/--/-/-/-
Telling us there’s lots of time to age and she’ll tell us when.......(14) /-/-/-/-/--/-/

well, you began the first two lines with iambic words, deviating from the other trochaic
beginnings and, in both cases, the meter was thrown off. Line #3 needs  changes to the meter
since you put "and she" in there. Line #4 the same with "and she'll". We need to change this whole stanza


Ok, let's throw in my changes and you read the revised poem and let me know if it sounds any better to you.
Say no if you don't think so, please. I won't make you clean erasers...promise!


Hide the liquor! Grandma's coming over once again!
It is liquor keeping Grandma fashionably thin.
Seems like gin, through hollow legs, goes right down to her toes.
Grandma stashes Merlot bottles under panty hose.

Hide the family jewels!  Grandma’s riding that noon train!
Fingers pick in stranger’s pockets, sticky once again.
Grandma pushes pilfered wallets down her canvas bag.  
Wired bras heft stolen goods from occupational sag.

Hide the checkbook!  Grandma can still copy down our names.
Holy cow! Our reputations will go down the drain.
Grandma rolls her pennies ( rolling men for money too).
Recreation narrowed when Grandma hit ninety-two!

Batten all the hatches; Grandma’s here now at the door!  
Darling little Grandma whom we lovingly  adore.
Frisk her to ensure  there are no weapons in her hose.
Grandma  packs an arsenal when moving on the go.

How we'd love to have her bake nice  cookies and sew hats,
All here know, though,  that is not where Grandma’s mind is at!
Grandma smokes  cigars and  often leers at younger men
Telling us there’s lots of time to age. She’ll tell us when.

It's still rough and can use more polishing but that's more of a vocabulary thing. Let me say that I admire you, Alison. Instead of giving up you show that you are determined to put in whatever effort necessary to try to improve this part of the craft and I applaud you for that! I'll help you in any way I can. (don't forget to bring my apple tomorrow!)
Alison
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17 posted 05-05-2008 01:39 AM       View Profile for Alison   Email Alison   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Alison

Okay, I printed your response and am going to look at it again.  I really appreciate your time - I have struggled with this for a long time.  I am not sure that I understand "long" and "short" - and am feeling rather idiotic at the moment.  

I think that your example will be really helpful because I can look over the poem as you are seeing it  -  and build on the changes.

I'd like to try this assignment again with another poem.  I think I am a bit mired in what I once saw in my head - maybe it would be best to give this one a rest.

What do you think, illustrious teacher?  Are you willing to hang with me on another shot at this assignment?

Thank you,
Alison

PS - I agree about the 'occupational drag' part - and everything else.  Is it possible to be rhythmiclaly handicapped?  I just don't tap in sync with the rest of the world maybe.

Okay enough excuses and whining.  I am gonna bury this one and work on another tomorrow.

Alison
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18 posted 05-05-2008 02:43 AM       View Profile for Alison   Email Alison   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Alison

Maybe my problem is that my feet don't smell enough!

---

Poetic Snit


My feet just seem to tap totally out of sync  
I am so frustrated I might need a stiff drink
I can’t count out a waltz and I can’t even knit
If counting is involved, I just cannot do it!

My head aches; my stomach is rolling and churning
My poor brain throbs from all this poetic learning
Why is poetry so complicated to write?
I’ll flunk class if I don’t learn to count meter right!

This poem should read like a plaintive country song
Whining might make it easier to find what’s wrong
Maybe I am too stubborn to just up and quit
I am truly in a metered poetic snit!

---

Alison


Essorant
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19 posted 05-05-2008 02:54 AM       View Profile for Essorant   Email Essorant   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit Essorant's Home Page   View IP for Essorant

I gave this ensample in another thread to try to express iambic very plainly.  Perhaps it may help Alison hear the meter more clearly:  

(Every second syllable is the "beat" you are looking for):

BeHIND this ROSE in SEcreCY
of MANy THINGS is KEPT the KEY.
And many farers come to me
And ask the runes of victory
The runes of love, the runes of lore
The runes of weal, the runes of war
But nothing from my answerhoard
Shall I uplift to any lord
Or lady come to me in need:
For nothing nothing is the meed.
But whoso gives his hearty cares
To write a verse, whoever dares,
This enterprise of price pursue
His due devoir in deed to do
Whoever seeks, with this in mind,
The answers truly he shall find.
For him that comes with poetry
For him I turn to turn the key.


The most important part is hearing the main (or "long") stresses first, then you may see how they are used to fill the pattern of "beats" (the syllables that are capitalized).  It is the main stresses that are the BEATS in a poem.  

1.  If a word is one syllable distinguish whether it is a Function Word or not.   If it is not a function word then it has main stress.  If it is a function word it doesn't.

2.  If a word is more than one syllable, only one syllable in the word has the main stress.  Pronounce the word carefully and listen for the syllable that has more pressure in pronunciation than all the others.  In horror the first syllable has the main stress (HORror). Sometimes pronouncing the word incorrectly may help find out where the stress is.  Pronouncing horror as horROR, putting most force on the second syllable, sounds incorrect to the ear, and thereby one may be the more sure that the stress must be on first syllable.  If you are unsure of the correct pronunciation , then usually the dictionary may help.  For example, at dictionary.com the pronunciation is given in brackets with the syllable that has the main stress in bold type: "Horror [hawr-er, hor-]"

Exception::The only exception to main stresses being the beats is that sometimes other syllables get away as "beats" by being necessary / important to the word-structure or sentence structure, or being given special emphasis.)


Hope that helps a bit.

Alison
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20 posted 05-05-2008 03:28 AM       View Profile for Alison   Email Alison   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Alison

Thank you, Essorant, for adding to the explanations.  I think it all is slowly coming together.  

One of my confusions is understanding the stress on one syllable words and how they fit as 'smelly feet'.  I feel like I am teetering on understanding after printing and reading the comments on this thread.  

I also have been reading Stephen Fry's book "The Ode Less Travelled" and will get it out and see if the chapters regarding stress, rhythm, meter, etc make more sense.

So far, the only stress I am feeling is in my head.

Thank you both for the time that you are taking to pull me through - and I will be back tomorrow with my third version of my Grandma poem.  Poor Grandma, it's not her fault that I am struggling.  I am beginning to detest her and her bagging hose!

A
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21 posted 05-05-2008 08:33 AM       View Profile for Balladeer   Email Balladeer   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit Balladeer's Home Page   View IP for Balladeer

Alison, you are not alone. Mysteria began a support group for people with feet problems called the DaDummers and they go to meetings and chant da DUM for hours on end.

I realize that, for those who have a natural ear for it, it seems simple and, for those who do not, it can be torturous but, once again, I appreciate your tenacity and will be here for you through da and DUM.The only thing I ask of people is that they make the attempt. You are certainly doing that.
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22 posted 05-05-2008 08:55 AM       View Profile for Balladeer   Email Balladeer   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit Balladeer's Home Page   View IP for Balladeer

Essorant, thank you for your input. Your example poem is very precise and accurate, along with your helpful hints and insights. The only thing I would question would be your statement If a word is more than one syllable, only one syllable in the word has the main stress, but I think we may have discussed that before. In your poem, for example, the word "enterprise" is used. One may argue that there is only one main stress syllable while others would contend that there are two - EN-ter-PRISE, with both accented syllables given equal stress. For the purpose of this lesson, though, (and not to make Alison's head explode!)  it is suffice to say that one uses the stressed and unstressed syllables to create iambic, trochaic, anapestic, dactylic, and spondees to create the proper rythym, without one standing up and claiming, "I'm the MAIN man and don't you forget it!"   Thanks again for sharing your knowledge with us.

Alison, this link leads to a page which I consider to be VERY complete and informative for those wishing to learn more of stress, rythym, beats, accents and feet and written in such a way it is easily understandable. I suggest you check it out.
http://www.anitraweb.org/kalliope/rhythm1.html
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23 posted 05-05-2008 09:02 AM       View Profile for Balladeer   Email Balladeer   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit Balladeer's Home Page   View IP for Balladeer

For those of you who hadn't seen it, our brilliant little Kit McCallum wrote a terrific lesson in poetic form on this same subject six years ago. Six years ago???? WOW! Where does the time go...?
http://piptalk.com/main/forumdisplay.cgi?action=displayarchive&number=69&topic=002478
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24 posted 05-05-2008 12:20 PM       View Profile for Alison   Email Alison   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Alison


Dear Mr. Balladeer,

I hate feet.  I have always hated feet.  I hate them on the end of legs and I hate them in poetry (where they attempt to disguise their little toes under poetic verbiage).  Anyway, I am taking all the suggested reading, all the lessons, my "Walrus and the Carpenter" poem and heading out for a day of fun and frolic at work.  When their is a break, I am dutifully going to take a look at my feet and the feet of others.

I have read that poem by Kit and love it.  I understand what everyone is telling me when I read it, it's when I write it that it all unravels.

Also, I have found a help line 1-800-DAD-UMIS.  I called but they are real dummies.  Anyway, see what I have regressed to.

Thanks and your apple is on the way.  I am sending it book rate to you.

A

(and THAT'S probably the ONLY "A" that I'll see on anything close to me in this lesson)
 
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