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Edward Grim
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0 posted 09-16-2006 12:31 AM       View Profile for Edward Grim   Email Edward Grim   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit Edward Grim's Home Page   View IP for Edward Grim

I think we need a dictionary forum. A forum where someone can go to learn words and discuss words; you know; their meanings, origins, whatever. I just think that'd be groovy.

Once you are truly insane, it’s all picnics with Kafka after that. See, it’s the process of going crazy that you gotta worry about.

Balladeer
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1 posted 09-16-2006 12:43 AM       View Profile for Balladeer   Email Balladeer   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit Balladeer's Home Page   View IP for Balladeer

Personally, I'd like to know where groovy came from!
Poet deVine
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2 posted 09-16-2006 08:34 AM       View Profile for Poet deVine   Email Poet deVine   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Poet deVine

  
groov¡Py [ grÈÉvee ] (comparative groov¡Pi¡Per, superlative groov¡Pi¡Pest)


adjective  

Definition:
  
excellent: used, often as an exclamation, to describe somebody or something that is fashionable, excellent, or pleasing ( dated slang )


[Mid-20th century. < in the groove]


groov¡Pi¡Ply adverb
groov¡Pi¡Pness noun

****

Not so sure a forum would work, but a thread in the Lounge or in the Workshop would be good.
Sunshine
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3 posted 09-16-2006 08:35 AM       View Profile for Sunshine   Email Sunshine   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit Sunshine's Home Page   View IP for Sunshine


Groovy suggestion, PdV!  
Marge Tindal
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4 posted 09-16-2006 10:54 AM       View Profile for Marge Tindal   Email Marge Tindal   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit Marge Tindal's Home Page   View IP for Marge Tindal

Edward~

The English Workshop is located here -
http://piptalk.com/main/forumdisplay.cgi?number=32

There are lots of discussion threads there that you might enjoy perusing~

... and I keep a shortcut to Dictionary.com on my desktop for quick self-checking~

http://dictionary.com

~*The sound of a kiss is not as strong as that of a cannon, but it's echo endures much longer*~
Email -         noles1@totcon.com     

Balladeer
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5 posted 09-16-2006 09:42 PM       View Profile for Balladeer   Email Balladeer   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit Balladeer's Home Page   View IP for Balladeer

Divine one, that's the definition but not the reference. Why groovy? What grooves? It is referring to a phonograph needle in the grooves of an album? If so, why would that lead to that definition? That's the interresting part that is rewarding to uncover
Sunshine
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6 posted 09-16-2006 10:00 PM       View Profile for Sunshine   Email Sunshine   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit Sunshine's Home Page   View IP for Sunshine

quote:
  Word Origins
Directory > Words > American Word Origins groovy
Origin: 1937

The first to be in the groove were African-American jazz musicians, early in the 1930s. They are no longer around to tell us where this groove came from, but scholars have speculated. Maybe it began with that relatively new invention, the phonograph, whose sound came out right when the needle was in the groove; maybe the musicians--virtually all of them men--were creating yet another metaphor for sex. No matter. What matters is the Cool (1949) sound when a player is really in the groove, not forcing the music but letting it flow. "The jazz musicians gave no grandstand performances," wrote an admiring reviewer in 1933, "they simply got a great burn from playing in the groove."

It could be summed up with the word groovy, defined in 1937 as a "state of mind which is conducive to good playing." Before long, there were groovy audiences as well as groovy performers, and by the 1940s things in general could be groovy. Love was groovy, skating was groovy, even pitching a no-hit baseball game was groovy. (By the way, since the early 1900s, the center of the strike zone in baseball has been known as the groove, and a pitcher who throws a fastball there is said to be grooving.)

Groovy was in the air everywhere in the hip, laid-back counterculture of the 1960s, when feeling groovy was the ultimate ambition and praise, as well as the title of a hit song. To groove was "to have fun." "Life as it is really grooves," declares a fictional letter from a group of groovy young dropouts in a 1969 short story by John Updike. Later generations have not always felt so groovy, but they know how to use the word when they want to speak so their elders can understand.

The adjective groovy has 2 meanings:

Meaning #1: (informal) very good

Synonyms: bang-up, bully, corking, cracking, dandy, great, keen, neat, nifty, not bad, peachy, slap-up, swell, smashing


Meaning #2: (British informal) very chic
  Synonym: swagger



Translations
Directory > Words > Translations Translations for: Groovy
Dansk (Danish)
adj. - med på det sidste nye, vanebunden, "høj", helt i orden

Nederlands (Dutch)
helemaal te gek, met groeven

Français (French)
adj. - sensass, super bien (arch), dans le vent (arch)

Deutsch (German)
adj. - (ugs.) klasse, rillenartig

Ελληνική (Greek)
adj. - της μόδας, μοντέρνος, τσίφτικος

Italiano (Italian)
alla moda, eccellente

Português (Portuguese)
adj. - bastante agradável (gír.)

Русский (Russian)
рутинный, обычный, превосходный

Español (Spanish)
adj. - atractivo, agradable, estupendo, excelente

Svenska (Swedish)
adj. - slentrianmässig, toppen, häftigt
http://www.answers.com/topic/groovy




COOL!

Edward Grim
Senior Member
since 12-18-2005
Posts 1112
Greenville, South Carolina


7 posted 09-16-2006 10:29 PM       View Profile for Edward Grim   Email Edward Grim   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit Edward Grim's Home Page   View IP for Edward Grim

My God, how did this whole thing turn into focusing on an adjective from the 70's?

But who cares, this is the stuff I like.


P.S. I like saying groovy, it's better than saying cool, gnarly or radical.

Once you are truly insane, it’s all picnics with Kafka after that. See, it’s the process of going crazy that you gotta worry about.

 
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