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Meter???

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GothicCherry
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since 09-16-2008
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TN


0 posted 02-15-2009 07:17 PM       View Profile for GothicCherry   Email GothicCherry   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for GothicCherry

Ok, I'm confused about this and I know it sounds silly, but can anyone explain to me how to use meter in my poems????

Nan
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1 posted 02-15-2009 07:33 PM       View Profile for Nan   Email Nan   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit Nan's Home Page   View IP for Nan

Hi there GothicCherry

You can start here in the workshop, where we worked on meter... da-DUM!

da-DUM-da-DUM-da-DUM-da-DUM-da-DUM

da-DUM

Then you can enjoy reading Kit's expert advice...

Playing With My Feet
GothicCherry
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since 09-16-2008
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TN


2 posted 02-15-2009 07:57 PM       View Profile for GothicCherry   Email GothicCherry   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for GothicCherry

Thank you!!

I understand what iambs are and the da/DUM thing. Now what are feet? Kit's words got mixed in my head and I couldn't make much sense of it all. It sounded very pretty though.

Oh, and I really appreciate the help!
Balladeer
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3 posted 02-15-2009 08:13 PM       View Profile for Balladeer   Email Balladeer   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit Balladeer's Home Page   View IP for Balladeer

A foot is described by the character and number of syllables it contains: in English, feet are named for the combination of accented and unaccented syllables; in other languages such as Latin and Greek, the duration of the syllable (long or short) is measured.


(disregard my earlier ramblings...too much multi-tasking at the same time. Thanks, Nanners)

[This message has been edited by Balladeer (02-16-2009 12:05 AM).]

Mysteria
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since 03-07-2001
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British Columbia, Canada


4 posted 02-15-2009 08:35 PM       View Profile for Mysteria   Email Mysteria   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for Mysteria

Get out really?  All this time I never asked.     I can't even get the da dums right, so didn't dare ask what a foot was.  LOL, now I am finding this funny, but guess you have to be here.

Well GothicCherry you came to the right place, Nan, Balladeer, and Kit do it "right!"
Nan
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5 posted 02-15-2009 11:38 PM       View Profile for Nan   Email Nan   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit Nan's Home Page   View IP for Nan

da-DUM - is an iambic foot.  Each set of metered syllables comprises a foot in poetry.

Iambic pentameter is a line of five iambic feet = da-DUM/da-DUM/da-DUM/da-DUM/da-DUM

da-da-DUM/da-da-DUM/da-da-DUM = three anapestic feet...

Does that make sense?
GothicCherry
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since 09-16-2008
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TN


6 posted 02-16-2009 07:33 PM       View Profile for GothicCherry   Email GothicCherry   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for GothicCherry

Yes, a lot more sense than I'd made of it before. Thanks a million.
Falling rain
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7 posted 02-16-2009 08:10 PM       View Profile for Falling rain   Email Falling rain   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit Falling rain's Home Page   View IP for Falling rain

Maybe I'm just slow today but I'm still confused about it.. I don't know at all what you guys are talking about.. Can you break it all down into something more simple and vague? lol

Please and thanks
-Zach

When I see your smile, and I know itís not for me, thatís when Iíll miss you.

turtle
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since 01-23-2009
Posts 491
Harbor


8 posted 02-16-2009 08:49 PM       View Profile for turtle   Email turtle   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for turtle

Hi cherry,

When I was trying to grasp meter I was just as confused as anyone else. Most of what
I was trying to comprehend was college level material that used terms I wasn't familiar
with. This was also presented in a way that assumed the reader had some previous understanding
of what was being talked about. I found that if I looked up the terminology and rewrote
an explanation in terms I could comprehend, it would instantly become clear. I ended up writing
a brief explanation of the concepts of structured verse  for the beginner,  called:

"Basics Of Rhyme"

I've posted this on other sites and some people DID find that it helped them to grasp
structured verse a little better.

If it's okay, I'll post this in the workshop and maybe it well help some of you.

http://piptalk.com/pip/Forum22/HTML/000990.html

    


[This message has been edited by turtle (02-16-2009 09:37 PM).]

Essorant
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since 08-10-2002
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Regina, Saskatchewan; Canada


9 posted 02-16-2009 11:05 PM       View Profile for Essorant   Email Essorant   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems   Click to visit Essorant's Home Page   View IP for Essorant

All you need to do is study how stress works in words and then you will generally recognize how it is put into special patterns by poets, from which these half-useless terms such as "feet", "iambic" "trochaic" etc come.  The stress of a word is generally the most pronounced syllable of a word, such as the hor- of horror.  The first syllable hor- of horror has more pressure and vibration on it.  That is the stress.  You need to listen at least halfcarefully to recognize that pressure, and eventually after practice you naturally grow an ear to hear that similar "spot" in other words.   If you are unsure of the correct pronunciation , then usually the dictionary may help.  For example, at dictionary.com the pronunciation is given in brackets with the syllable that has the stress in bold type: "Horror [hawr-er, hor-]".

Where people were saying "DUM" above, that is where the stresses of words generally go, where they were saying "da" that is where other syllables go.  If a normal word has only one syllable that one syllable has the stress.  But little words such as to, from, of, in, or, I, he, it, etc. don't have stress.  The rest is a bunch of exceptions and variations that may be learned along the way.  

[This message has been edited by Essorant (02-17-2009 04:19 PM).]

GothicCherry
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since 09-16-2008
Posts 471
TN


10 posted 02-17-2009 09:10 AM       View Profile for GothicCherry   Email GothicCherry   Edit/Delete Message      Find Poems  View IP for GothicCherry

OH MY GOSH!! Thank you sooo much! That helps me a lot. It's all starting to make a lot more sense than it did before. I guess I'm not very good with the complicated words. Lol...
 
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